Share stories of your favorite female ancestors for Women’s History Month

(Update – I am sharing your stories at the end of this post, as they come in.  Kim Caswell, your stories and ancestor’s journal are too good to be missed in just a comment, so I have added them here.  And we think that we have challenges being mothers in the modern world! Thanks for your many contributions, and friendship.)

Who is your Favorite Female Ancestor?

Share stories of your favorite female ancestors for Women’s History Month.

I love how my Grandma Muriel Ruthe could do just about any craft-sewing, knitting, crochet, embroidery; and home-making skill – cooking, baking, freezing, canning, ironing, cleaning, gardening, and flower arranging.  Her home was filled with her warmth and skills, and she taught me and my siblings how to do them.  Many of her beautiful possessions and creations have made their way to her grandchildren.

Who’s your favorite female ancestor?

From Kim Caswell:

I actually have two favorite ancestors and the stories of them. First being my mother, LaVila (Vi) Buetow. She was the ‘glue’ of our family and held us together and made a struggled life work for us. My father had an extremely bad heart and could do little but make sure we all knew every ounce of love he had for us. With 10 kids, 7 still at home, mom always made it work, whatever the challenge. Somehow she was able to stretch that one last potato to feed at least 3 of us. She made the majority of our clothing for the girls, shirts for the boys and with three younger sons – mending was in never-ending supply. She made the draperies, bed and furniture coverings for our home and still found time to make the church robes for our Pastor and taught sewing to the ladies of the church. Even in the end, wheelchair bound, sapped of strength and on oxygen, she was always offering to held with or do things for others.
My other favorite ancestor story is of a 3x-great-aunt who was alone in the cabin while her husband was hunting to stock provisions for the nearing winter. Alone with a sickly 4 year old and new baby during a bad storm, the wind coming through the cracks between the boards of the cabin walls set the hanging lanterns rocking. The journal reads: “The lantern glass got broke from last eve’s wind but the lanterns still hadda been needed. So hung they were an’ castin’ sore light on the place but light they gave. The wind rockin it tipped jus right and spilt burnin oil on young Gerrolds cradle and set the coverins to burin with Gerrold still in um. I cuddnt get to reach fer him an dint have enough water inside the place but I had a big pot o soup on the stove an wet as it was an not yet to hot I throwed it on the coverins. Gerrolds leg got burnt abit but hes whole an hearty and all glory be to the Lord for that.” No THAT is worth admiration.

 

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One thought on “Share stories of your favorite female ancestors for Women’s History Month”

  1. I actually have two favorite ancestors and the stories of them. First being my mother, LaVila (Vi) Buetow. She was the ‘glue’ of our family and held us together and made a struggled life work for us. My father had an extremely bad heart and could do little but make sure we all knew every ounce of love he had for us. With 10 kids, 7 still at home, mom always made it work, whatever the challenge. Somehow she was able to stretch that one last potato to feed at least 3 of us. She made the majority of our clothing for the girls, shirts for the boys and with three younger sons – mending was in never-ending supply. She made the draperies, bed and furniture coverings for our home and still found time to make the church robes for our Pastor and taught sewing to the ladies of the church. Even in the end, wheelchair bound, sapped of strength and on oxygen, she was always offering to held with or do things for others.
    My other favorite ancestor story is of a 3x-great-aunt who was alone in the cabin while her husband was hunting to stock provisions for the nearing winter. Alone with a sickly 4 year old and new baby during a bad storm, the wind coming through the cracks between the boards of the cabin walls set the hanging lanterns rocking. The journal reads: “The lantern glass got broke from last eve’s wind but the lanterns still hadda been needed. So hung they were an’ castin’ sore light on the place but light they gave. The wind rockin it tipped jus right and spilt burnin oil on young Gerrolds cradle and set the coverins to burin with Gerrold still in um. I cuddnt get to reach fer him an dint have enough water inside the place but I had a big pot o soup on the stove an wet as it was an not yet to hot I throwed it on the coverins. Gerrolds leg got burnt abit but hes whole an hearty and all glory be to the Lord for that.” No THAT is worth admiration.

    Like

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