Publicity Photographs taken of the Genealogy CLUB – August 31, 2016

Publicity Photographs taken of the

Stateline Genealogy Club @ Beloit Public Library

August 31, 2016.

 

Thanks to  Shelly Evans, Shirley Bauer, Diane Gemignani, Kim Caswell, Tom Hess and daughter, who were able to make an extra trip to the Library and join me to be in photographs taken by professional photographer Susan – of Brian Thomas Photography.

You did a great job representing the Library programs and the Stateline Genealogy Club @ Beloit Public Library, while having fun.

In the background of the first photograph are the microfilm cabinets that hold microfilms of Beloit Daily News, and other microfilms.

The painting, also in the background of the first photograph,  is “The Birth Of Beloit” by Frank Boggs (1915 – 2009).  It depicts French Canadian Indian Trader Tebo negotiating the sale of “his” property to pioneer Caleb Bloggett.  He bought the “Three looks” at a bargain, as it was enough land to start a city.

 

Vicki’s Note – Here is a history lesson on Tebo (and a Beloit Wisconsin connection to Stephen Mack of Macktown/Rockton Illinois)  from Genealogy.com  :

” Joseph Tebo

By Don Sonneson September 15, 2013 at 11:44:32

Joseph Thiebault, AKA Tebo, was a French Canadian trapper who worked for the America Fur Trading Co. He trapped the area of the Rock River from Madison Wisconsin South. He had a cabin at the junction of Turtle Creek (Beloit WI) and Rock River. He had 2 Indian wives and I find reference to 5 children. Joseph Jr., Francois, Wm Henry, Therese who died in infancy and Baptiste. The wifes names appear to be Lisette and Scho-coi-we-kah. Baptiste was born to Thiebault’s wife who was half Winnebago and half French. He disappeared from his cabin @ Tebo Point on the lake Koshkonong sometime after Jan. 1838. In 1853 the children were in Cass County Territory of Minnesota. Thiebault has many spellings in documents as Tebo couldn’t spell it. Thibault, Thibault, Thebeau, Thebolt. Stephen Mack referred to Thiebault as being a dissipated man. (He drank)”

And another from Wisconsin Historical Societyhttp://www.wisconsinhistory.org/Content.aspx?dsNav=N:4294963828-4294963805&dsRecordDetails=R:CS2393

“Historical Essay

Beloit, Wisconsin – A Brief History

“…French trapper Joseph Thiebault came to the area to trade with the Ho-Chunk in the 1820s, the first white man to settle in the area. New Englander Caleb Blodgett purchased Thiebault’s land in 1836 and is credited as Beloit’s first permanent settler.

The New England Immigrating Company, led by Dr. Horace White, arrived in 1836 and began buying land from Blodgett. Soon friends and family were moving to the area. Churches and schools were planned, mills were running using water from the Rock River, businesses took root in the village, and the cornerstone of Beloit College was laid in 1846…”

Photo 1.  Our nice Genealogy/Local History Area at the Beloit Public Library.

gen-club-6

 

Note the 2012 wall map of the Rock County townships and towns, (Milwaukee Map Service) in the background of Photograph 2, and all of the Beloit City Directories and Beloiter High School Yearbooks in the foreground.  Also note the 4 small study rooms – for up to 3 people to use for 2 hours.

We instantly started exploring, and sharing while we waited for the photographer to be ready.

 

Photo 2. – The photographer said, “Don’t move.  It’s perfect.

gen-club-1

 

 

Photos 3 & 4 –  One is never too young to start seeking family history and learning genealogy; starting with how to use our microfilm readers.   We also have a new computer microfilm reader.  🙂

gen-club-4 gen-club-5

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