7 Important Clues From the 1880 U.S. Census

Vicki’s note – article by Kate – Legacy Tree Genealogists.

7 Important Clues From the 1880 U.S. Census

 

Census reports, when available, are one of the backbones of genealogical research. They help us trace family members back and forth in time and provide a great deal of biographical information about each person, all in a neatly arranged table format. It is easy to focus on those all-important columns which provide the key facts: name, age, occupation, marital status, place of birth.

The 1880 U.S. Census is well-known for being the first census to (finally!) report the relationship of each individual to the head of the household. It was also the first to specify the place of birth not only of the individual being enumerated, but also the place of birth of his or her parents. Genealogists love the 1880 U.S. Census for providing those much-needed clues.

But hidden in plain sight, in all of those other columns that often only contain a tick-mark, is additional information which can provide a great deal of information about the lives of our ancestors. Not all of them are always used, but when they are, they offer a bonanza of detail and a deeper glimpse into the lives of these individuals. Here are seven places you should always check in the 1880 U.S. Census and why!

#1 – The two columns before Column 1

We tend to give scant notice to the first two columns of the census. We know that they track the number of the dwelling and the number of the family, noting how many families live in a building, such as an apartment or tenement house. But beginning in 1880, there were two additional columns added to the census before Column 1. Designed for city use, these note the street name in the first column, and the house number in the second column. With this information we can pinpoint the exact address at which our ancestors lived. In the example below we can see that the Samuel Gracey family lived at 85 Lexington Street in Boston and their neighbors, at 89 Lexington Street, were the Howland Otis family.

gracey-fam1-300x278

#2 – Column 7

This column isn’t often used, but if your ancestor was born during the census year (June 1879 through May 1880) the month of his or her birth should be noted in this column. This makes finding a birth or baptismal record a lot easier.

#3 – Column 12

If your ancestors were married during the census year the month in which their wedding took place should be noted in this column. As with the birth designation, this can help narrow your searches for marriage records considerably.

#4 – Column 14

This column isn’t completed for everyone (mostly adult males) and when it is, there are just small numbers written there. Those numbers indicate the number of months in which that individual was unemployed during the previous year. This provides a picture of the financial situation of the family, and sometimes helps to explain why the children were working.

#5 – Column 15

Every time I see something written in this column, I get excited. You just never know what you will see there. This column asks if the individual was sick or temporarily disabled on the day that the enumerator arrived. If so, the enumerator was to specify the illness or reason for the disability.

In the example below, it appears that Margaret and Ann were suffering from bilious fever when the enumerator showed up at their house.

bilious-fever-300x154

#2 – Column 7

This column isn’t often used, but if your ancestor was born during the census year (June 1879 through May 1880) the month of his or her birth should be noted in this column. This makes finding a birth or baptismal record a lot easier.

#3 – Column 12

If your ancestors were married during the census year the month in which their wedding took place should be noted in this column. As with the birth designation, this can help narrow your searches for marriage records considerably.

#4 – Column 14

This column isn’t completed for everyone (mostly adult males) and when it is, there are just small numbers written there. Those numbers indicate the number of months in which that individual was unemployed during the previous year. This provides a picture of the financial situation of the family, and sometimes helps to explain why the children were working.

#5 – Column 15

Every time I see something written in this column, I get excited. You just never know what you will see there. This column asks if the individual was sick or temporarily disabled on the day that the enumerator arrived. If so, the enumerator was to specify the illness or reason for the disability.

In the example below, it appears that Margaret and Ann were suffering from bilious fever when the enumerator showed up at their house.

Kate – Legacy Tree Genealogists Researcher

With a Master’s degree in history, Kate loves to help clients really see into the lives of their ancestors. She is a gifted writer and has a great breadth of experience that helps her gather treasured details about a person’s heritage. Some of Kate’s favorite things to research are Native American genealogy and Civil War ancestors.
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