Category Archives: Genealogy Computer Aids

LegacyFamilyTree.com software 1/2 price sale EXTENDED to August 20; AND 15% off Coupon too!

1/2 price sale EXTENDED to August 20!

Vicki’s Note – A coupon from Thomas MacEntee to apply toward the sale 1/2 price for buying the Deluxe 9 version of Legacy Family Tree Software. 

MyHeritage.com and LegacyFamilyTree.com are joining.  There is a big sale on the software through August 13.

This is the software that I use to help tame my ever-growing collection of genealogy research information.  It was finally enough savings to prompt me to purchase the upgrade from version 8.  One can also download a free version. 

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Save an Additional 15% Off Legacy Family Tree’s Super Sale!

Did you know that Genealogy Bargains has EXCLUSIVE COUPONS to save you an additional 15% during the Legacy Family Tree 50% Super Sale?

PLEASE NOTE: The post content below contains affiliate links. See disclosure statement below.

Legacy 9.0 Released with Amazing New Features. Check out the new features you’ll find in the highly-anticipated new version of Legacy Family Tree Software: Hinting, Reports and Charts, FindAGrave.com Searching, Online Backup, Stories, Hashtags, Compare 2 People, Color Coding, and dozens of other enhancements!

Additional 15% Savings During Legacy Family Tree Super Sale!

You may have heard that Legacy Family Tree is set to be acquired by MyHeritage in the near future (read the news here). To celebrate this amazing event, you can get some amazing discounts on Legacy software as well as Legacy Family Tree Webinar memberships (see below).

BUT WAIT! BEFORE YOU BUY, make sure you use the following promo codes to save an additional 15%!

  • Legacy 9 Deluxe Software: regularly $34.95, now just $17.48 – click HERE and use promo code thomas15leg at checkout to bring the price down to just $14.86!
  • Legacy Family Tree Webinars: 1 Year Membership (new or extension), regularly $49.95, now just $24.98 – click HERE and use promo code thomas15 at checkout to bring the price down to just $21.23!

NOTE: If you want to order BOTH the software and the webinar membership, order them as as separate transactions in order to use the promo codes and save.

Click HERE to save – via Legacy Family Tree

***

PLEASE NOTE: The post content above contains affiliate links. This means I make a percentage of sales via these links. This does not INCREASE the price you pay as a consumer. It simply supplements my income so I can continue providing as much free genealogy content as possible through my “abundance model.”

DisclaimerAll prices and offers are subject to change. Some items may be sold out and have limited inventory. Also check to see if you have automated purchase settings enabled, such as Amazon Buy with 1-Click: it is your responsibility to make sure you are getting the correct price for an item before you check out and finalize the transaction.

Disclosure statement: I have material connections with various vendors and organizations. To review the material connections I have in the genealogy industry, please see Disclosure Statement.

©2017, copyright Thomas MacEntee.  All rights reserved.

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Legacy 9.0 Deluxe (software for PC on CD & download, printed & PDF manual)

Price: $39.95 $19.98
Status: Digital products have immediate download availability. Shipped products begin shipping 2nd week of May.
Weight: 1 lb, 0 oz
Quantity: 1

Includes:

  1. Legacy 9.0 Deluxe software on CD and via download.
  2. Legacy Charting Deluxe software (installed when Legacy 9.0 is installed)
  3. The official 301-page Legacy 9.0 User’s Guide, printed and PDF editions.
  4. Legacy for Beginners training video (on installation CD).

Sophisticated research tools, powerful search capabilities, and professional-quality trees, reports, and books make the award-winning Legacy Family Tree the program of choice for users of all levels and abilities. Search the Internet for billions of genealogy records.

After your order is processed, your unique Legacy 9 Customer Number will be immediately available to you on screen and in your receipt.To upgrade from Legacy 8.0 Deluxe (or earlier Deluxe editions), click here.

Heraldry and Titles of Rank

Vicki’s note – “Heraldry Websites for Genealogy” is an article from FamilyTreeMagazine.com  on a topic that we don’t often see.  Interesting to read that Coat of Arms does not = Surname.  I still claim the few  Coats of Arms that I know associated with some of my ancestor’s surnames, and “my” Muir family castle in Ireland.

I think in America (U.S.A), that we don’t concern ourselves much with the conventions of heraldry and distinctions of  titles of rank.  I even saw places on-line where anyone can buy title of rank, so I think that the whole world’s attitude toward the (mostly former) formal distinctions is relaxing.

This is not to insult my BLOG’s British, Scottish, and Irish, etc. viewers.  I do realize that titles of rank are still very important and current in your cultures.

I am adding all of these links to my BLOG “Genealogy Links and Electronic Helps” page.

And wow – look at the rare gem of a website that I found today.  You get two related articles/sources in one Posting –

Read more about the Titles of Rank in this really extensive website.  After reading through these lists, I may have to reconsider my statement about “mostly former distinctions” above.  My anthropological and history background reminds me that humans have set up hierarchies and named distinctions as an on-going aspect of being part of human cultures.

There are a lot of wide-ranging lists here at – http://www.sunderedspheres.com/titles-of-rank.html

That website includes:

“Ranks of All Nations Possible” historic & modern – i.e.

Royal and Noble Ranks, Modern and Historic Military Ranks, Modern and Historic Political Ranks,  Modern and Historic Religious Hierarchy, Monastic ranks, Knights/Militant Ranks,  Historical Titles and Classes, Scots, Welsh, Irish, British, Byzantine, Estonian, French, Germanic, German, Saxon, Gothic, Greek, Hungarian, Italian, Languedoc (Southern French), Norse, Roman Empire, Russian, Slovenian, Spanish, Egyptian (Ancient), Hausa & Mali, Hindustani,  Islamic/Religious, Japanese, Mongol, Moorish, Persian, Semitic & Hebrew, Swahili, Turkic, Turkish, Chileno, United States, and Miscellaneous Ranks

The first part of that website states:

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Titles of Rank

Ranks and their Definitions:

The following social ranks are given from highest to lowest instead of alphabetically.  The titles given are first male then female, and the etymology is terrestrial.  

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Heraldry Websites for Genealogy

7/21/2017
This list of resources will get you started in researching heraldry.

Myth: Many surnames have a coat of arms.

Fact: Coats of arms are not attached to a surname, but rather to an individual. People with the same surname may be entitled to different coats of arms, or not have one at all, unless they can prove that they are directly descended from a legitimate male member of that line – or one is granted to them.

Are you researching heraldry?

Here are some resources to start:

The American Heraldry Society

Heraldica

College of Arms

Heraldry for Genealogists 

Institute of Heraldic and Genealogical Studies—UK

American College of Heraldry

Coats of Arms from Ireland

And just for fun, this website explores the real history, heraldry and family trees that inspire Game of Thrones. Warning: contains spoilers.

On-line Name Indexes to County Histories And More

Vicki’s note – a very valuable resource that I just found on Facebook.com. Cathy L. O’Connor loves County History books as much as I do. Thank you Cathy.

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Cathy introduces her site –

“After discovering the value of every name indexes for, and being disappointed at the lack of free every name indexes available online, I began compiling and publishing my own.

This website was created to share my every name indexes with you so you can save valuable research time and easily locate your ancestors in those big old texts. I hope you find something here that helps you!

 

 

EveryNameIndex.com currently offers hundreds of free every name indexes covering 36 states.

To browse all the free indexes Click Here:

EveryNameIndex.com\

(Cathy also offers these multitude of other genealogy links:)

GENEALOGY Links

Here you will find lots of helpful genealogy links.  Many have assisted me in my personal genealogy research.  Some offer information, products, or services that may be of interest to you.  They are provided for your convenience.  I do not endorse or take responsiblity for the content, privacy practices, transactions, or other functions of these websites.

…..

Free Every Name Indexes for Old County Histories

 

Copyright 2007-2017. Cathy L. O’Connor. All rights reserved.

Website last updated on 01 May 2017.

Legacy User Facebook Group

Vicki’s note – Join this group if you use Legacy on your computer as your genealogy software program.

Legacy User Facebook Group

 

LEGACY USER GROUP ON FACEBOOK
Have a Legacy question? Want to share a favorite tip? Come see what others are sharing. Join more than 13,600 other Legacy users today in our new Facebook group.
GO THERE

The Genealogy Do-Over Workbook & other Bargains

 Vicki’s Note – Some genealogy bargains from Thomas MacEntee:

Rural Cemetery Studies

Rural Cemetery Studies

7-3-2017

Vicki’s note – a quote I read from another on-line source that I found. I am including the entire addendum from the on-line book.  However, I could not find out who did the 2012 revision of this priceless 1970s publication.  My hat’s off to any and all (Find-a-grave, Boy Scout, etc.) volunteer photographers,  restorers, and researchers who find and preserve genealogical information for the rest of us.

I also love his quote about those ancestors, “…who dared to settle the prairie lands of western Illinois and raise their families.”

Read this just to know how lucky we are to have the Internet and computers to aid us in our research.

Hint – google on-line.  You may just find the very exact resource you need for the tiny area that you are researching.:

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RURAL CEMETERIES OF McDONOUGH COUNTY, ILLINOIS

VOLUME VII
NEW SALEM -ELDORADO
BY DUANE LESTER
GOOD HOPE, ILLINOIS
PRINTED BY
SCHUYLER –BROWN HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY
AND
THE SCHUYLER JAIL MUSEUM

http://genmarker.com/McDonough/RuralCemVols/Vol07Rev.pdf :

” a monument is erected not because a person died, but because a person lived”

“ADDENDUM
Mr. Lester’s Magnum Opus is nothing short of monumental. It is not easy to gain access to many of these historic family burial sites. By the time of Mr. Lester’s survey (1970’s) numerous plots were long left abandoned, overgrown with trees and weeds and monuments under attack by weather, livestock, vandals, and property owners who did not care about the burial sites of McDonough County’s brave pioneers.
Thankfully, we now (2012) have laws to protect our county’s historical legacy and these final resting gardens.
I am in awe of Mr. Lester for his transcriptions of hard – to – read tombstones and his laborious typing of his 18 Volumes of the Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County. He did not have access to a computer. In addition to transcribing information from tombstones, he had to painstakingly access county records (e.g. 1840 county tax list), federal census records, and local newspapers requiring a great deal of time and effort.
As a genealogist in 2012, I have access to the internet with fast access to US Census
records, Family Search (records kept by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter – Day Saints) and numerous other legal documents, books, and family journals.
Mr. Lester used an old-fashioned key – strike, ribbon tape typewriter where mistakes
were hard to correct and appear as overstrikes. There are very few attesting to his skill as a typist.
What an US Census record will not contain are the names and dates of infants who died between census surveys. Mr. Lester’s tombstone records give names and dates of children, whose lives were brief, but would otherwise be lost to history without his efforts. Frequently, he provides names of brothers and sisters, fathers and mothers that allows for completion of family group sheets.
Another work of love for those who dared to settle the prairie lands of western Illinois and raise their families is being performed by Dr. A. Gil Belles. He has been able to install signs for each of these rural cemeteries and provide GPS (Global Positioning System) information making it easier for anyone wishing to visit a rural cemetery to help them actually find it.
Gil also works closely with Boy Scouts and other civic groups to help cleanup, clear brush and dead trees, locate buried tombstones, and restore stones. My revision of Mr. Lester’s document will provide information on all cemetery restoration projects.
Any changes made to Mr. Lester’s original work was done in blue color font. His maps were scanned and copied into the text and remain like his original work and are not subject to editing.
His text was transcribed using MS Word, enabling me to control font size and color. Retyping text also leaves room for typo errors. Mr. Lester’s rare typo errors are corrected but not displayed in blue. This MS Word document allows on -the – fly editing of any “Notes, Corrections, Additions, and Changes” found at the end of every cemetery. This was Mr. Lester’s intent to produce a working document and improve accuracy about the information on those buried.
I have retyped state abbreviations as they are now used (e.g. IL, instead of Ill.). On 1840 county tax lists I omitted cents (e.g. $140, instead of $140.00). The current MS Word font uses less space, thus, placing more text per line. This shrinks his documents and reduces pages. This , then, changes page numbering in each Table of Contents.
Cemetery locations are also found on the internet. See: McDonough County Illinois Cemeteries http://graveyards.com/graveyards/IL/McDonough

Ancestry.com – U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925

Vicki’s note – article from a June update email I received from Ancestry.com:

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U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925

Ancestry.com

passport applications
U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925
For over 200 years the State Department has issued American citizens with passports. Though they were not required for travel abroad until World War I, passport applications are an excellent resource to tap into for everything from names, birthplaces, and residences, to occupation and immigration details.

Search Here

About U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925

Passport applications from 1795–1925 are contained in this database including emergency passport applications (passports issued abroad) for the years 1877–1925; special passport applications (military, diplomats, civilian federal employees, and dependents), 1914–1925; applications for extension and amendment of passports, 1918–1925; applications for certificates of identity in Germany, 1920–1921; and applications for declarants 1907–1911 and 1914–1920. It also contains passport application registers for 1810–1817, 1830–1831, and 1834–1906. Passports issued March 4–5, 1919 (numbers 67500–67749) are missing from the NARA collection and not in this database.

Although there are passport records from multiple states in this database, specific state, U.S. territory, and U.S. possessions collections are as follows:

  • California (1914–1925)
  • Hawaii (1907–1925)
  • Illinois (1914–1925)
  • Louisiana (1914–1925)
  • New York (1914–1925)
  • Philippines (1907–1925)
  • Puerto Rico (1907–1925)
  • Washington (1914–1925)

About U.S. Passport Applications, 1795–1925

The U.S. government has issued passports to American citizens since 1789 through several different agencies over the years. For the most part, passports were not required of U.S. citizens for foreign travel until World War I, although they were mandatory for a short time during the Civil War (Aug. 19, 1861–Mar. 17, 1862). An Executive Order given in 1915 and a later act of Congress in 1918 established the passport requirement for citizens traveling abroad. This law lapsed with the formal termination of World War I and treaties with Germany, Austria, and Hungary in 1921. With the onset of World War II In 1941, the Congressional act of 1918 was reinstated requiring U.S. citizens to carry a passport for foreign travel as is required today.

Passport Applications

Passport applications can provide a wealth of information, including:

  • Name of applicant
  • Birth date or age
  • Birthplace
  • Residence
  • Date of application or issuance of passport
  • Father’s and/or husband’s name
  • Father’s and/or husband’s birth date or age
  • Father’s and/or husband’s birthplace
  • Father’s and/or husband’s residence
  • Wife’s name
  • Date and place of immigration to the U.S.
  • Years of residence in the U.S.
  • Naturalization date and place
  • Occupation
  • Physical characteristics

To receive a U.S. passport, a person had to submit proof of U.S. citizenship usually in the form of a letter, affidavits of witnesses, and certificates from clerks or notaries. Sometimes these additional documents are included as part of the application as is a photo of the applicant.

Application Forms

There was a variety of passport application forms used throughout the years. By 1888 there were separate application forms for native citizens, naturalized citizens, and derivative citizens (children who become citizens through their parents’ naturalization). As a result, all of the above listed information may not be available for every applicant. Likewise, there may be additional information other than what is shown above on the application form; some information may only be obtained by viewing the image of the application.

Passport Application Registers

Passport application registers may provide:

  • Date and number of application
  • Name of applicant
  • Age of applicant (1834–1849)
  • Physical characteristics of applicant (1834–1849)

Some of the above information was taken from:

  • J. Dane Hartgrove. Descriptive Pamphlet to Registers and Indexes for Passport Applications. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, 1986.
  • Loretto Dennis Szucs, Kory L. Meyerink, and Marian Smith, “Immigration Records” in The Source: A Guidebook to American Genealogy, ed. Loretto Dennis Szucs and Sandra Hargreaves Luebking (Provo, Utah: Ancestry, 2006).

Free FamilySearch.org Family History Library Abundant Genealogy Webinars

Vicki’s note – 5-30-2017 article from Thomas MacEntee about free classes and webinars.  Thanks to Ron Zarnick who sent this to me.

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Free FamilySearch.org Family History Library Abundant Genealogy Webinars

Free Family History Library Classes and Webinars for June 2017 – Abundant Genealogy
https://abundantgenealogy.com/wp-content/themes/mh-newsdesk-lite/js/css3-mediaqueries.js

familysearch

[Editor’s Note: we received the following announcement from our friends at FamilySearch regarding their free classes and webinars coming up in June. Please take advantage of this great opportunity!]

The Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah, has announced its free family history classes and webinars for June 2017. Participants can attend in person or online. The June classes feature instruction on how to do research in China, Britain, and Germany, tips and tricks on using U.S. records. In addition, a variety of how-to classes will be taught which includes indexing in several languages, using FamilySearch more effectively, searching Civil War records and more. Mark your calendars for events you want to join so you don’t forget. Easily find and share this announcement online in the FamilySearch Newsroom.

Online classes are noted on the schedule as webinars. Webinar attendees need to click the link next to the class title at the scheduled date and time to attend the class online. Those attending in person simply go to the room noted. Invite your family and friends. All class times are in mountain standard time (MST).

If you are unable to attend a class in person or online, most sessions are recorded and can be viewed later online at your convenience. To access these, go to the archive for Family History Library classes and webinars.

DATE / TIME

CLASS (SKILL LEVEL)

WEBINAR | ROOM
Sat, 3 June, 1:00 PM Buscando antepasados en los registros civiles (Beginner) Webinar | B1 Lab
Mon, 5 June , 10:00 AM Using the FamilySearch Catalog Effectively (Beginner) Webinar | M Lab
Tues, 6 June, 11:00 AM Overview of FamilySearch.org (Beginner) Webinar | M Lab
Wed, 7 June, 10:00 AM Starting Family Tree: Preserving Memories Using Photos andDocuments (Intermediate) Webinar | M Lab
Wed, 7 June, 1:00 PM Researching in German Archives (Intermediate) Webinar | MF – B
Wed, 7June, 3:00 PM Ask Your United States Research Question (Beginner) Webinar | MF – B
Thurs, 8 June, 11:00 AM U.S. Vital Records Overview (Beginner)  Webinar | MF – B
Thurs, 8 June, 7:00 PM Language Indexing Event (1½ hrs.) (Intermediate) M Lab
Sat, 10 June, 9:30 AM Italian Language Indexing (1½ hrs.) (Intermediate) 2N Lab
Sat, 10 June, 9:30 AM Spanish Language Indexing (1½ hrs.) (Intermediate) M Lab
Sat, 10 June, 12:30 PM French Language Indexing (1½ hrs.) (Intermediate) 2N Lab
Sat, 10 June, 12:30 PM Portuguese Language Indexing (1½ hrs.) (Intermediate) M Lab
Mon, 12 June, 10:00 AM Using the FamilySearch Catalog Effectively (Beginner) Webinar | M Lab
Tues, 13 June, 11:00 AM Tips and Tricks for Using FamilySearch’s Historical Records (Intermediate) Webinar | M Lab
Tues, 13 June, 1:00 PM How to Find Ancestors in the Digitalarkivet (Beginner) Webinar | MF – B
Mon, 19 June, 10:00 AM Using the FamilySearch Catalog Effectively (Beginner) Webinar | M Lab
Mon, 19 June.1:00 PM Chinese Research on FamilySearch.org (Beginner) Webinar | M Lab
Tues, 20 June, 11:00 AM Family Tree Next Step: Attaching Non-FamilySearch Sources (Intermediate) Webinar | M Lab
Tues, 20 June, 1:00 PM Tracing Pre-1900 British Army Ancestry (Intermediate) Webinar | B2 Lab
Wed, 21 June, 1:00 PM Using the Genteam Website for Austrian and Czech Research (Beginner) Webinar | MF – B
Thurs, 22 June, 11:00 AM What’s New at FamilySearch.org (Beginner) Webinar | M Lab
Thurs, 22 June, 1:00 PM Scotlands People (Intermediate) Webinar | B2 Lab
Thurs, 22 June, 3:00 PM The Blue and Gray: Finding U.S. Civil War Records (Beginner) Webinar | MF – B
Mon, 26 June, 10:00 AM Using the FamilySearch Catalog Effectively (Beginner) Webinar | M Lab
Tues, 27 June, 10:00 AM Submitting Names for Temple Work (LDS Account required) (Beginner) Webinar | M Lab
Wed, 28 June, 11:00 AM Introducing Danish Probates (Beginner) Webinar | MF – C
Thurs, 29 June, 1:00 PM Your British Questions Answered (Beginner) Webinar | B2 Lab

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 5,000 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

©2017, copyright Thomas MacEntee.  All rights reserved.

CAGGNI Internet Special Interest Group Event

Vicki’s note – notice of an event from (CAGGNI) Computer Assisted Genealogy Group of Northern Illinois:

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(CAGGNI) Computer Assisted Genealogy Group of Northern Illinois- Internet Special Interest Group Event:

Upcoming event information:
Internet Special Interest Group Schaumburg Public Library
Date: 10 Jun 2017 12:45 PM CDT

Welcome to the CAGGNI INTERNET SIG!

Internet Genealogical Services include Ancestry, Family Search, My Heritage, Find My Past, WikiTree and many others.  The Internet Special Interest Group intends to review questions about these services and have a dialog on the advantages and features of the services used by members.  This complements the features available from computer programs such as Family Tree Maker or RootsMagic that exploit the on-line databases available from the internet services.

Facilitator:  Alan Wilson
For more information: Internet Special Interest Group

Best regards,
CAGGNI

New Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden Putting Library of Congress On-line

Vicki’s note – May 27, 2017 article “The US Library of Congress Just Put 25 Million Records Online, Free of Charge”, by DAVID NIELD on Sciencealert.com   

The new Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden is working on putting Library of Congress On-line.  I agree with her quote, “The Library of Congress is our nation’s monument to knowledge and we need to make sure the doors are open wide for everyone, not just physically but digitally too.” 
I give pause to the badly named workshop that the Library of Congress hosted- Hack-to-Learn workshop looking at how the data could be used.  Do we really want “library” and “hack” in the same place?
Look below for links to more newly on-line data from NASA, National Museum of Natural History, Unpaywall, and eight more:
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Knowledge is power, the old saying goes, but it isn’t much use if it’s hidden away – so we’re excited to learn that the US Library of Congress is making 25 million of its records available for free, for anyone to access online.

The bibliographic data sets, like digital library cards, cover music, books, maps, manuscripts, and more, and their publication online marks the biggest release of digital records in the Library’s history.

 

“The Library of Congress is our nation’s monument to knowledge and we need to make sure the doors are open wide for everyone, not just physically but digitally too,” says Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden.

“Unlocking the rich data in the Library’s online catalogue is a great step forward. I’m excited to see how people will put this information to use.”

Researchers and analysts will get most use out of the new records, but there’s plenty of potential for them to be used in apps and databases as well. The Library hosted a Hack-to-Learn workshop looking at how the data could be used.

The new mine of information covers records from 1968, and the earliest days of electronic cataloguing, right up to 2014.

“The Library of Congress catalogue is literally the gold standard for bibliographic data and we believe this treasure trove of information can be used for much more than its original purpose,” says the Library’s Beacher Wiggins.

Thanks to the spread of a little invention known as the internet, we’re seeing more and more libraries, organizations, and agencies put their valuable data online for all to use.

Last year NASA decided to make all of the scientific research it funds available on the web for free, hoping to spark further studies and “magnify the impact” of its papers.

NASA also allows developers to download and build upon its software applications, without paying any royalty or copyright fees, so whether you’re wanting to build a rocket or analyse satellite data, you can find a tool to help.

Want to know more about Darwin’s iconic On the origin of Species work? Point your browser at the American Museum of National History website and you can digitally leaf through 16,000 high-resolution images free of charge.

Meanwhile, the Unpaywall plug-in is designed to get past scientific journal paywalls legally and easily, so inquiring minds can learn more about our world without having to stump up for a subscription.

There’s lots out there. If you’re eager to get your hands on as much free educational material as possible, here are 8 awesome resources you can totally get behind.

That the US Library of Congress is adding to the trend is definitely welcome news – the library is the largest in the world, having been established at the start of the 19th century as a resource for Congress.

The Library’s collections include more than 38 million books and more than 70 million manuscripts, and now some of that vast pile of reference data and other resources can be accessed by anyone for free.

“We hope this data will be put to work by social scientists, data analysts, developers, statisticians and everyone else doing innovative work with large data sets to enhance learning and the formation of new knowledge,” says Wiggins.

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