Category Archives: Genealogy Computer Aids

Ancestry.com – U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925

Vicki’s note – article from a June update email I received from Ancestry.com:

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U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925

Ancestry.com

passport applications
U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925
For over 200 years the State Department has issued American citizens with passports. Though they were not required for travel abroad until World War I, passport applications are an excellent resource to tap into for everything from names, birthplaces, and residences, to occupation and immigration details.

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About U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925

Passport applications from 1795–1925 are contained in this database including emergency passport applications (passports issued abroad) for the years 1877–1925; special passport applications (military, diplomats, civilian federal employees, and dependents), 1914–1925; applications for extension and amendment of passports, 1918–1925; applications for certificates of identity in Germany, 1920–1921; and applications for declarants 1907–1911 and 1914–1920. It also contains passport application registers for 1810–1817, 1830–1831, and 1834–1906. Passports issued March 4–5, 1919 (numbers 67500–67749) are missing from the NARA collection and not in this database.

Although there are passport records from multiple states in this database, specific state, U.S. territory, and U.S. possessions collections are as follows:

  • California (1914–1925)
  • Hawaii (1907–1925)
  • Illinois (1914–1925)
  • Louisiana (1914–1925)
  • New York (1914–1925)
  • Philippines (1907–1925)
  • Puerto Rico (1907–1925)
  • Washington (1914–1925)

About U.S. Passport Applications, 1795–1925

The U.S. government has issued passports to American citizens since 1789 through several different agencies over the years. For the most part, passports were not required of U.S. citizens for foreign travel until World War I, although they were mandatory for a short time during the Civil War (Aug. 19, 1861–Mar. 17, 1862). An Executive Order given in 1915 and a later act of Congress in 1918 established the passport requirement for citizens traveling abroad. This law lapsed with the formal termination of World War I and treaties with Germany, Austria, and Hungary in 1921. With the onset of World War II In 1941, the Congressional act of 1918 was reinstated requiring U.S. citizens to carry a passport for foreign travel as is required today.

Passport Applications

Passport applications can provide a wealth of information, including:

  • Name of applicant
  • Birth date or age
  • Birthplace
  • Residence
  • Date of application or issuance of passport
  • Father’s and/or husband’s name
  • Father’s and/or husband’s birth date or age
  • Father’s and/or husband’s birthplace
  • Father’s and/or husband’s residence
  • Wife’s name
  • Date and place of immigration to the U.S.
  • Years of residence in the U.S.
  • Naturalization date and place
  • Occupation
  • Physical characteristics

To receive a U.S. passport, a person had to submit proof of U.S. citizenship usually in the form of a letter, affidavits of witnesses, and certificates from clerks or notaries. Sometimes these additional documents are included as part of the application as is a photo of the applicant.

Application Forms

There was a variety of passport application forms used throughout the years. By 1888 there were separate application forms for native citizens, naturalized citizens, and derivative citizens (children who become citizens through their parents’ naturalization). As a result, all of the above listed information may not be available for every applicant. Likewise, there may be additional information other than what is shown above on the application form; some information may only be obtained by viewing the image of the application.

Passport Application Registers

Passport application registers may provide:

  • Date and number of application
  • Name of applicant
  • Age of applicant (1834–1849)
  • Physical characteristics of applicant (1834–1849)

Some of the above information was taken from:

  • J. Dane Hartgrove. Descriptive Pamphlet to Registers and Indexes for Passport Applications. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, 1986.
  • Loretto Dennis Szucs, Kory L. Meyerink, and Marian Smith, “Immigration Records” in The Source: A Guidebook to American Genealogy, ed. Loretto Dennis Szucs and Sandra Hargreaves Luebking (Provo, Utah: Ancestry, 2006).

Free FamilySearch.org Family History Library Abundant Genealogy Webinars

Vicki’s note – 5-30-2017 article from Thomas MacEntee about free classes and webinars.  Thanks to Ron Zarnick who sent this to me.

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Free FamilySearch.org Family History Library Abundant Genealogy Webinars

Free Family History Library Classes and Webinars for June 2017 – Abundant Genealogy
https://abundantgenealogy.com/wp-content/themes/mh-newsdesk-lite/js/css3-mediaqueries.js

familysearch

[Editor’s Note: we received the following announcement from our friends at FamilySearch regarding their free classes and webinars coming up in June. Please take advantage of this great opportunity!]

The Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah, has announced its free family history classes and webinars for June 2017. Participants can attend in person or online. The June classes feature instruction on how to do research in China, Britain, and Germany, tips and tricks on using U.S. records. In addition, a variety of how-to classes will be taught which includes indexing in several languages, using FamilySearch more effectively, searching Civil War records and more. Mark your calendars for events you want to join so you don’t forget. Easily find and share this announcement online in the FamilySearch Newsroom.

Online classes are noted on the schedule as webinars. Webinar attendees need to click the link next to the class title at the scheduled date and time to attend the class online. Those attending in person simply go to the room noted. Invite your family and friends. All class times are in mountain standard time (MST).

If you are unable to attend a class in person or online, most sessions are recorded and can be viewed later online at your convenience. To access these, go to the archive for Family History Library classes and webinars.

DATE / TIME

CLASS (SKILL LEVEL)

WEBINAR | ROOM
Sat, 3 June, 1:00 PM Buscando antepasados en los registros civiles (Beginner) Webinar | B1 Lab
Mon, 5 June , 10:00 AM Using the FamilySearch Catalog Effectively (Beginner) Webinar | M Lab
Tues, 6 June, 11:00 AM Overview of FamilySearch.org (Beginner) Webinar | M Lab
Wed, 7 June, 10:00 AM Starting Family Tree: Preserving Memories Using Photos andDocuments (Intermediate) Webinar | M Lab
Wed, 7 June, 1:00 PM Researching in German Archives (Intermediate) Webinar | MF – B
Wed, 7June, 3:00 PM Ask Your United States Research Question (Beginner) Webinar | MF – B
Thurs, 8 June, 11:00 AM U.S. Vital Records Overview (Beginner)  Webinar | MF – B
Thurs, 8 June, 7:00 PM Language Indexing Event (1½ hrs.) (Intermediate) M Lab
Sat, 10 June, 9:30 AM Italian Language Indexing (1½ hrs.) (Intermediate) 2N Lab
Sat, 10 June, 9:30 AM Spanish Language Indexing (1½ hrs.) (Intermediate) M Lab
Sat, 10 June, 12:30 PM French Language Indexing (1½ hrs.) (Intermediate) 2N Lab
Sat, 10 June, 12:30 PM Portuguese Language Indexing (1½ hrs.) (Intermediate) M Lab
Mon, 12 June, 10:00 AM Using the FamilySearch Catalog Effectively (Beginner) Webinar | M Lab
Tues, 13 June, 11:00 AM Tips and Tricks for Using FamilySearch’s Historical Records (Intermediate) Webinar | M Lab
Tues, 13 June, 1:00 PM How to Find Ancestors in the Digitalarkivet (Beginner) Webinar | MF – B
Mon, 19 June, 10:00 AM Using the FamilySearch Catalog Effectively (Beginner) Webinar | M Lab
Mon, 19 June.1:00 PM Chinese Research on FamilySearch.org (Beginner) Webinar | M Lab
Tues, 20 June, 11:00 AM Family Tree Next Step: Attaching Non-FamilySearch Sources (Intermediate) Webinar | M Lab
Tues, 20 June, 1:00 PM Tracing Pre-1900 British Army Ancestry (Intermediate) Webinar | B2 Lab
Wed, 21 June, 1:00 PM Using the Genteam Website for Austrian and Czech Research (Beginner) Webinar | MF – B
Thurs, 22 June, 11:00 AM What’s New at FamilySearch.org (Beginner) Webinar | M Lab
Thurs, 22 June, 1:00 PM Scotlands People (Intermediate) Webinar | B2 Lab
Thurs, 22 June, 3:00 PM The Blue and Gray: Finding U.S. Civil War Records (Beginner) Webinar | MF – B
Mon, 26 June, 10:00 AM Using the FamilySearch Catalog Effectively (Beginner) Webinar | M Lab
Tues, 27 June, 10:00 AM Submitting Names for Temple Work (LDS Account required) (Beginner) Webinar | M Lab
Wed, 28 June, 11:00 AM Introducing Danish Probates (Beginner) Webinar | MF – C
Thurs, 29 June, 1:00 PM Your British Questions Answered (Beginner) Webinar | B2 Lab

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 5,000 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

©2017, copyright Thomas MacEntee.  All rights reserved.

CAGGNI Internet Special Interest Group Event

Vicki’s note – notice of an event from (CAGGNI) Computer Assisted Genealogy Group of Northern Illinois:

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(CAGGNI) Computer Assisted Genealogy Group of Northern Illinois- Internet Special Interest Group Event:

Upcoming event information:
Internet Special Interest Group Schaumburg Public Library
Date: 10 Jun 2017 12:45 PM CDT

Welcome to the CAGGNI INTERNET SIG!

Internet Genealogical Services include Ancestry, Family Search, My Heritage, Find My Past, WikiTree and many others.  The Internet Special Interest Group intends to review questions about these services and have a dialog on the advantages and features of the services used by members.  This complements the features available from computer programs such as Family Tree Maker or RootsMagic that exploit the on-line databases available from the internet services.

Facilitator:  Alan Wilson
For more information: Internet Special Interest Group

Best regards,
CAGGNI

New Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden Putting Library of Congress On-line

Vicki’s note – May 27, 2017 article “The US Library of Congress Just Put 25 Million Records Online, Free of Charge”, by DAVID NIELD on Sciencealert.com   

The new Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden is working on putting Library of Congress On-line.  I agree with her quote, “The Library of Congress is our nation’s monument to knowledge and we need to make sure the doors are open wide for everyone, not just physically but digitally too.” 
I give pause to the badly named workshop that the Library of Congress hosted- Hack-to-Learn workshop looking at how the data could be used.  Do we really want “library” and “hack” in the same place?
Look below for links to more newly on-line data from NASA, National Museum of Natural History, Unpaywall, and eight more:
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Knowledge is power, the old saying goes, but it isn’t much use if it’s hidden away – so we’re excited to learn that the US Library of Congress is making 25 million of its records available for free, for anyone to access online.

The bibliographic data sets, like digital library cards, cover music, books, maps, manuscripts, and more, and their publication online marks the biggest release of digital records in the Library’s history.

 

“The Library of Congress is our nation’s monument to knowledge and we need to make sure the doors are open wide for everyone, not just physically but digitally too,” says Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden.

“Unlocking the rich data in the Library’s online catalogue is a great step forward. I’m excited to see how people will put this information to use.”

Researchers and analysts will get most use out of the new records, but there’s plenty of potential for them to be used in apps and databases as well. The Library hosted a Hack-to-Learn workshop looking at how the data could be used.

The new mine of information covers records from 1968, and the earliest days of electronic cataloguing, right up to 2014.

“The Library of Congress catalogue is literally the gold standard for bibliographic data and we believe this treasure trove of information can be used for much more than its original purpose,” says the Library’s Beacher Wiggins.

Thanks to the spread of a little invention known as the internet, we’re seeing more and more libraries, organizations, and agencies put their valuable data online for all to use.

Last year NASA decided to make all of the scientific research it funds available on the web for free, hoping to spark further studies and “magnify the impact” of its papers.

NASA also allows developers to download and build upon its software applications, without paying any royalty or copyright fees, so whether you’re wanting to build a rocket or analyse satellite data, you can find a tool to help.

Want to know more about Darwin’s iconic On the origin of Species work? Point your browser at the American Museum of National History website and you can digitally leaf through 16,000 high-resolution images free of charge.

Meanwhile, the Unpaywall plug-in is designed to get past scientific journal paywalls legally and easily, so inquiring minds can learn more about our world without having to stump up for a subscription.

There’s lots out there. If you’re eager to get your hands on as much free educational material as possible, here are 8 awesome resources you can totally get behind.

That the US Library of Congress is adding to the trend is definitely welcome news – the library is the largest in the world, having been established at the start of the 19th century as a resource for Congress.

The Library’s collections include more than 38 million books and more than 70 million manuscripts, and now some of that vast pile of reference data and other resources can be accessed by anyone for free.

“We hope this data will be put to work by social scientists, data analysts, developers, statisticians and everyone else doing innovative work with large data sets to enhance learning and the formation of new knowledge,” says Wiggins.

New Old Beloit Newspaper Microfilm and a Magnifying Machine at the Library

New Old Beloit Newspaper Microfilm and

a Magnifying Machine at the Library

by Vicki Ruthe Hahn

SGS Stateline Genealogy Sorter

May 26, 2017

Thanks to our Library cataloger, we now have some long-awaited microfilms available (and a few more to come.)

There were many newspapers published in Beloit, Wisconsin before ( and contemporary to) the Beloit Daily News.

The Beloit Public Library will be closed on Monday, May 29 for Memorial Day, but take the time to research your military ancestors at home.

And come another time to see if any of these newspaper microfilms have your Beloit ancestors:

“Daily Graphic”, Beloit, Wisconsin – January 13, 1877 thru July 28, 1877.

“Daily Outlook” Beloit, Wisconsin – Two reels

December 20, 1881 thru May 31, 1882

June 1, 1882 thru November 22, 1882

You can also use the new magnifying machine in the Genealogy and Local History Collection area (similar to this image).  It was donated by a library patron.  It is very easy to use to enlarge one of our maps, small print in a book, etc.  It even has a reverse positive/negative that you can use to help interpret tricky handwriting, etc.

 

DNA Testing – Hummmmm

Vicki’s Note – this is a post b

The following post gives me pause, but it sounds like the Ancestry.com “contract” has been “corrected”.  When I got my DNA tested at Ancestry.com, I did see the option to share my results (statistically only) with scientific research.  I decided not to do that at this time.  Giving Ancestry.com too much power?

Anyway, us genealogists are suckers for anything that make our searches easier.  DNA testing has been worth it for many people to help break down walls. 

I have a wonderful new relationship with a third cousin mutually discovered by DNA test results.  He is from the original “home” state Pennsylvania, and has been invaluable to help to me and my sisters sleuth out family history clues on-site.  We have traded old family photos as well.

I still think DNA testing is worth it, and Ancestry.com is the powerhouse tester.  Four million tests generates a lot of good results.

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25 May 2017

Ancestry.com denies exploiting users’ DNA

25 May 2017

http://www.bbc.com/news/business-40045942

A leading genealogy service, Ancestry.com, has denied exploiting users’ DNA following criticism of its terms and conditions.

The US company’s DNA testing service has included a right to grant Ancestry a “perpetual” licence to use customers’ genetic material.

A New York data protection lawyer spotted the clause and published a blog warning about privacy implications.

Ancestry told BBC Radio 4’s You and Yours its terms were being changed.

Headquartered in Utah, Ancestry is among the world’s largest for-profit genealogy firms, with a DNA testing service available in more than 30 countries.

‘Perpetual’

The company, which uses customers’ saliva samples to predict their genetic ethnicity and find new family connections, claims to have more than 4 million DNA profiles in its database.

Ancestry also stores the profiles forever, unless users ask for them to be destroyed.

BBC

The company’s terms and conditions have stated that users grant the company a “perpetual, royalty-free, worldwide, sublicensable, transferable license” to their DNA data, for purposes including “personalised products and services”.

In a statement to You and Yours, an Ancestry spokesperson said the company “never takes ownership of a customer’s data” and would “remove the perpetuity clause”.

It added: “We will honour our commitment to delete user data or destroy their DNA sample if they request it. The user is in control.”

‘Unaware’

Joel Winston, a consumer rights lawyer and former New Jersey State deputy attorney-general, was one of the first to spot the legal wording and to warn of the possible implications.

“Ancestry.com takes ownership of your DNA forever; your ownership of your DNA, on the other hand, is limited in years,” he said.

He added: “How many people really read those contracts before clicking to agree? How many relatives of Ancestry.com customers are also reading?”

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Mr Winston also warns that many consumers are unaware of the additional uses of the data.

In its terms and conditions Ancestry makes reference to “commercial products that may be developed by AncestryDNA using your genetic information”.

One customer, Richard Peace, used AncestryDNA to learn more about his family history.

‘Not happy’

He told You and Yours he “knew nothing” about the commercial use when he signed up for the test.

“I’m not happy about it and today I will be emailing them to ask them not to use the information,” he said.

Ancestry told the BBC: “We do not share user data for research unless the user has voluntarily opted-in to that sharing.”

The company added: “We always de-identify data before it’s shared with researchers, meaning the data is stripped of any information that could tie it back to its owner.”

The ambitious scale of Ancestry’s plans does have support among some academics.

Debbie Kennett, a genetics researcher at University College London, welcomed the aim of building a large, global DNA database.

“For genealogy purposes we really want, and rely on, the power of these large data sets,” she told You and Yours. “A DNA test on its own doesn’t tell you anything at all.”

You and Yours is on BBC Radio 4 weekdays 12:15-13:00 GMT. Listen online or download the programme podcast.

 

Ancestry.com “Saves” are not Permanent Until You Save the Records to Your Computer

Ancestry.com “Saves” are not Permanent Until You Save the Records to Your Computer

Vicki’s note – a 5-26-2017 posting on Facebook from the FamilyHistoryDaily.com https://www.facebook.com/familyhistorydaily/  BLOG.

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Stop ‘Saving’ Records to Your Ancestry Tree Until You Read This

It’s no secret that we love free genealogy sites here at Family History Daily. But, we have to admit, we also like Ancestry.com. Next to FamilySearch.org, you’re not going to find a larger, more diverse genealogy website — and many of us are willing to pay their subscription fees for that reason alone.

But we also like Ancestry for the convenient free family tree they offer. It’s easy to get started with, maintain and share (or keep private). Plus, they’ve made it extremely convenient to add records from Ancestry’s databases. A couple of clicks and you can easily attach any number of sources, or names, to your tree (although we could tell you why that’s generally a bad idea).

But it’s this very convenience that poses a serious problem for many family historians. Most people who keep their trees on Ancestry.com probably regularly attach records to individuals using the ‘Save This Record’ function …..”

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Read the rest of the article here to find out how to save Ancestry.com records to your computer, not just to your Ancestry (online subscription) Family Tree.  Good hints on backing up your data, and updated information on the status of the replacements for Ancestry Family Tree Maker Software – TreeSync; and FamilySync from MacKiev.:

http://familyhistorydaily.com/genealogy-help-and-how-to/stop-saving-records-to-your-ancestry-tree-until-you-read-this/

EXCLUSIVE from Thomas MacEntee: Save 15% on NEW Legacy 9.0 Family History Software

Vicki’s Note – Well it finally is here – the new Version 9 update of Legacy genealogy software to keep track of your family history searches.  There is a free version available also. 

I bought Version 8, and like it, when I have time to do my own family genealogy.  And Thomas MacEntee has come up with a special discount, if you want to buy the enhanced version of Legacy 9.   Thanks Thomas.  I also suggest buying the CD as well as the download.  

Try the free version (see link below).  I found the enhancements worth paying for the paid version of Legacy 8.  I think that the new “hinting” feature (super leafs!) itself is going to be worth getting the upgrade of Legacy 9,

I cannot wait to try the other features.  They are amazing, and just upped the competition for other software providers.  Be sure to click on the link below to see details on the new enhancements.  I knew that they were working on this, but I am one joyous genealogist to see what fun is in store for me with all of the unexpected wonderful new features!

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EXCLUSIVE from Thomas MacEntee: Save 15% on NEW Legacy 9.0 Family History Software

by Thomas MacEntee

April 18, 2017

Legacy Family Tree has just released Version 9.0 of its amazing genealogy software – you can save 15% via Genealogybargains.com
http://www.legacyfamilytree.com/WhatsNew9.asp
 Legacy 9

Legacy 9.0 software for genealogy and family history research has just been released with amazing new features. Check out the new features you’ll find in the highly-anticipated new version of Legacy Family Tree Software:

  • Hinting: Legacy 9 sifts through billions of records from the key websites –  FindMyPast, FamilySearch, GenealogyBank, and MyHeritage – for new information, pictures, and stories of your ancestors. As you add to your tree, Legacy 9 begins the search – automatically!
  • Reports and Charts: See trends in your ancestors’ medical history with the new Cause of Death charts. Expand your genetic genealogy tools with the new X‐DNA color schemes. Get everyone involved at your next reunion or family gathering with Family Tree BINGO – play with cards of your ancestors, descendants, or a mixture. You can also now see your tree at a glance in the Family Dictionary.
  • FindAGrave.com Searching: One‐click access to your ancestor’s Find A Grave memorial. Create a list of people in your tree with or without Find A Grave IDs.
  • Online Backup: You’ll never worry about losing your data again. In addition to backing up to your hard drive, a thumb drive, or a DVD, you can now backup your Legacy to the Legacy Cloud. It also makes transferring to a new computer a breeze.
  • Stories: Preserve the stories of your ancestors or stories of your own. The new Stories tool lets you  record, organize and print multiple stories for any of your ancestors.
  • Hashtags: Create unlimited hashtags to describe your ancestors. Then search for or print a report of everyone who shares that hashtag. You’re no longer limited to 9 tags. Call them anything you want – #civilwar  #DNAtested  #farmer  #ProvenAncestor  #BrownHair
  • Compare 2 People: Researching two same‐named individuals? Having difficulty differentiating two John Smiths in the same place? The new Chronology Comparison report puts them side‐by‐side, color codes their similarities and differences, and helps you determine if they could be the same person.
  • Color Coding: Legacy’s popular color‐coding system has been expanded. Now enjoy the ancestor color coding in both the Index View and Name List, making it simple to know what part of your tree you are looking at.
  • And dozens of other enhancements: Digital pictures are now auto‐sorted by date. View all 9 tags in the Name List. Two additional  custom toolbar buttons, and much more . . . .

The upgrade price, if you currently have Legacy Deluxe, is $26.95. For first time buyers, the price is $34.95 for the download version of Legacy 9.0 Deluxe. Click here and use promo code thomas15leg at checkout and save 15%! To take Legacy 9.0 Standard for a test with a FREE DOWNLOAD, click here.

Click here for more information and to upgrade your current copy of Legacy or get the new version – via Legacy Family Tree

Disclosure statement: I have material connections with various vendors and organizations. To review the material connections I have in the genealogy industry, please see Disclosure Statement.

©2017, copyright Thomas MacEntee. All rights reserved.

Free download of Google Earth Pro

Vicki’s note – April 6, 2017 article from Family Tree Legacy Genealogy insider e-newsletter, Diane Haddad:

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Free download of Google Earth Pro

Download Google Earth Pro for Free

Geography and genealogy go hand in hand: researching places tells you about the ancestors who lived there. This makes Google Earth software incredible handy, and now you can download Google Earth Pro for free. Watch Google Earth guru Lisa Louise Cooke explain what’s so great about this program–and learn about our Google Earth for Genealogists online course starting April 10. Read More…

Photographs in a Family Tree

Photographs in a Family Tree

by Vicki Ruthe Hahn

SGS – Stateline Genealogy Sorter

3-26-2017

My family collaborated on creating a 6-generation family tree including photographs. Our main motivation was to get something for our Mom (Daisy Bennett Ruthe) to enjoy.  She has been having dementia for several years, and wanted a picture of each person, so that she could remember who each one was, and who belonged to who.

My sister Chris used a great on-line photograph book-making program, http://mikescamera.com/books-full.html , to make family memory books. She photographed my (second) wedding and made a book for my husband and I.  (Look for promo discount codes online for Mikescamera).  Mom doesn’t know that she will be getting a book soon also.

The program that Chris used for the photograph family tree is Aperture, but she is not sure Apple still supports it.

Another (genealogy fan) sister, Melodie, and I helped Chris with the dates and names of the 6-generation ancestors.  A third cousin (Ancestry.com DNA test respondant!) sent me several family photographs so that we could add more faces for our ancestors which we did not have in our photography collection.

Chris put in different silhouettes for any ancestors that we did not have photos for.  This is the top part of the large sheet, which Chris had laminated.  I did not include any living relatives in this photo (3 more generations.)

Capture

                                                          Our Mom, Daisy, is here   

                                                                  and here. 

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Daisy was happily surprised, “Just What I needed!”  She had a great time re-discovering all of her family/ancestors, and her grand/great-grand children.  It literally took me a couple of minutes before I could take this photograph.  My camera phone was balking, and I had to reboot the camera before it would work.  Mom was still pointing out folks.

Chris insisted that we had to get this project finished and get it to Mom asap.  She was  right.

I have been away from work and too busy to post on my BLOG lately.  My Mom has been in the hospital for observation due to her having visual hallucinations.  The diagnosis is not final yet, but it looks like a more severe form of dementia.  As POA, I will be even more busy with helping her.

The good thing is that I have been able to spend lots of time with her, and am writing down all of her Daisy Stories as she tells us her memories.

Don’t wait.  Always let your people know that you love them, and record their stories.