Category Archives: How-to-do genealogy

6 Frequently Asked Questions About Marriage Records

 

6 Frequently Asked Questions About Marriage Records

Vicki’s Note – 1-17-2018 – an article from Ancestral Findings:
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Marriage records are considered one of the Top Three “basic” genealogical records. These are the records every beginning genealogist should start out using, and the ones they will turn to again and again as they become experienced genealogists and discover even more ancestors. The Top Three are: Birth, Death, and Marriage. These comprise the basic records of vital statistics that tell the main information anyone wants to know about their ancestors. Of course, as an experienced genealogist, you will want to research more and discover the stories of the lives of your ancestors, the details behind the dates and names. However, you still must start with the basics. Here are the top six most frequently asked questions about marriage records, and how they are used in genealogy.

https://ancestralfindings.com/6-frequently-asked-questions-…

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Essential Family Tree Forms

Vicki’s note – Family Tree has some very good forms for genealogy.  This Family Tree e-newsletter shows you can get 5 for free below.Click on the link below:

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A Sample of Essential Family Tree Forms

To help you kick your new year off right, we’re giving away 5 of our favorite essential genealogy forms! Here’s how to get yours.
Businessman signing documents – Getty Images

January is often a time of resolutions, fresh starts, and getting organized. If you’ve been joining us in our Month of Family History Fitness you are already well on your way to a year of great genealogy health, but we want to help you take it even further!

To assist you in your 2018 research, we’re offering 5 of our very favorite essential family tree forms for free. Taken from this collection of 75 forms, the genealogy worksheets, templates and checklists to organize family facts and track your genealogy work. Each letter-size PDF form is enhanced so you can type and save your work, or simply print blank forms to fill in.

You’ll receive our:

Family Group Sheet
Source Documentation Cheat Sheet
Death Records Worksheet
Research Calendar
Online Search Tracker

To download the forms simply enter your email address in the form below.

 

Cheers to a year of breaking down brick walls and mastering your research!

https://www.familytreemagazine.com/articles/a-sample-of-essential-family-tree-forms/

 

U.S. Federal Census Guides by Questions (Information Asked), & by Year

U.S. Federal Census Guides

by Questions (Information Asked), & by Year

12-29-2017

Vicki’s note – thorough, concise guides to what information is on each of the United.States Federal Censuses.  Charts are done by the question (information asked for), AND by the Census year – from 1790 – 1940. 

This is the Family History Daily article – “The Ultimate Quick Reference Guide to the U.S. Census for Genealogy”. Thank you to Family History Daily Associate Writer Jessica Grimm for her hard work making this guide possible.

Click HERE for their full article. 

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Here are some Brief Reminders from Vicki:

1790 – 1840 The head of household was the only individual listed by name.  All other residents were represented by hash marks within ranges of age, and slave/free.

1850  was the first year that all individuals were listed by name rather than just head of household , (Native Americans and slaves excluded).

1880 was the first year to report the relationship of each individual to the head of the household and to specify the place of birth of the individual being enumerated, and also of his/her parents. 

1890 was the first year that Enumerators were instructed to add the street name and house numbers. 

1920 was the first year that- Individuals were recorded by permanent residence instead of temporary residence (where they worked or visited). 

See also other U.S. Federal Census postings on my BLOG  – 

How do I find out what the dwelling house number was on a street by using the (ED) Enumeration District numbers on a U. S. Federal Census?

“Finding the (ED) Enumeration District numbers on a Census – More Information” Nov 28, 2017

 “Research Roadmap: Enumeration District Maps” Nov 28, 2017   Family Tree Magazine article by

 

 

ALT Codes for Foreign Language Letters with Accents

 

12-27-2017

Vicki’s note – another great site I found.  There is a chart of  foreign language letters, as well as multiple other charts – currency, Spanish, Greek, math, symbols, etc.  I am book-marking this site on my computer!  

There is also a link to instructions below (and on the site.)  Simply hold down the “ALT” key on your keyboard while keying in the number indicated for each letter/symbol.

See also My  BLOG Page “Genealogical Links and Electronic Helps – scroll down to look under the alphabetical categories “Latino Ancestors” and “Translations and Foreign Languages in Genealogy”.  :

ALT Codes for Foreign Language Letters with Accents

https://usefulshortcuts.com/alt-codes/accents-alt-codes.php

Welcome to Useful Shortcuts, THE Alt Code resource!

If you are already familiar with using alt codes, simply select the alt code category you need from the table below.

If you need help using alt codes find and note down the alt code you need then visit our instructions for using alt codes page.

List of Alt Codes for entering characters with accents

A Fun Photo Discovery

A Fun Photo Discovery

by Vicki Ruthe Hahn

SGS Stateline Genealogy Sorter

I was able to date (my 2 x Great Grandmother’s) Lucy Adams Leighty’s dress from researching and presenting my program several times on “Contemporary Fashion through the Decades – How to Identify Our Ancestors’ Timelines  by What They Wore, When”.   I am learning the time periods of some of the historic styles by sight.

Here is Lucy Adams Leighty’s 1897 dress:

Lucy Adams dress 1Lucy Adams dress 2Lucy Adams dress 3Lucy Adams dress 4

My sisters and brother have been working on a 600+ pages family photograph book; Chris is creating the book, all of us donated photographs, two of us (Melodie and I)  are editing and doing genealogy research (as fast as we can) to fill in gaps, and I have been writing family stories about our ancestors based on research.  So much for waiting until I semi-retire someday and have more time to do all that!  🙂
Greg, our third cousin from Pennsylvania, has been invaluable in donating old family photographs and filling in family history.  We connected due to an Ancestry.com DNA test match.
If the “book” is ever published on paper, we would have to split it into 2 books.  The cost would be about $1 per page through the program that my sister is using.  We may just print one copy and give everyone else a DVD or electronic version.  What a great way to preserve family history.  The very last revision needed from me was to write a story to go with these photos.
My niece Andrea had done research on this dress for her college costuming history class.  She had surmised that Lucy made the special dress for her own wedding (in 1867).  This is not the correct style for that time period.  And Andrea had put in examples of 1890s dresses. 
Hint – don’t let preconceived notions of family stories detract you from the evidence, “i.e. “This must have been Gt Gt Grandma’s (1867) wedding dress.”  Keep your mind open to see the possibilities.  Look for clues and pieces of the puzzle that fit together.
While writing this history story last night, I discovered the fun photo discovery:
I was right – the dress is from 1897!  Lucy sewed the dress for her to wear as mother-of-the-bride at her daughter’s wedding!
Lucy Adams (probably) beautifully sewed this dress herself.  It’s style of fitted sleeves with a small puffed upper “leg of mutton” is from about 1897, when Lucy would have been age 60.  She married William Smith Leighty on March 29, 1867. They had five children in 20 years. Lucy and her husband were farmers in Morgan, Ohio.
Lucy may have worn a small bustle with the dress, as the back is longer by about an 1 1/2 inches.  It has a one-piece fitted bodice with hook and eye closure, and full skirt which was a little less full than the style (as a cost savings?)  The special fabric – a print of white flower sprigs on dark blue/black,  and the black lace collar, indicate that she made it for a special occasion, probably her daughter Annetta’s wedding.
One of Lucy’s children was our paternal Great Grandmother Annetta Leighty Jewison.  Annetta married Charles Oscar Jewison on February 17, 1897, in McDonough, Illinois. They had three children during their marriage, including our paternal grandmother Muriel Helen Jewison Ruthe.
Great Great Grandma Lucy would have used this as a Sunday dress afterward.

There is a New Version of FindAGrave.com

There is a New Version of FindAGrave.com

Vicki’s note – this is a good time of year to feature a resource that I use regularly.  You can either access FindAGrave.com directly or click on a link to it from a search in Ancestry.com when you see it as a suggestion in your search for a particular ancestor.

Don’t rely on the Ancestry.com record.  I always go to the FindAGrave site to look at any/all information listed.  There are good clues on the person’s relatives.  It is worth looking at each of the grave listing for each of those people as well. 

Also look by last name(s) only for any other relatives buried in that cemetery.  I know a couple of volunteer who do photography for FindAGrave.  I always appreciate their technique of photographing any other headstones near the requested one that has the same last name. Not all do that, but as they say, “I figure they would want to know.”  Yes we do!

A final step would be to do a general (non-specific location) for anyone with that name.  Your ancestor may be buried in another cemetery in a different location/state.  At the end of life, many ancestors go to live with their child away from the area that they were connected to previously.

To use Findagrave.com to look for out of United States graves do a redefine search and put the country in. It doesn’t always find graves in other countries. Most cemeteries in Findagrave are in the United States.

You can look on the Findagrave.com link below to get an idea of the number of graves that they list in different countries.

https://www.findagrave.com/tocs/geographic.html

I am not sure if theChanges are coming to Find A Grave. See a preview now.”  have happened yet.  The FindAGrave link to their new version is dead. Following are excerpts from two  article on the changes.

This July 10, 2017  article says that both the old and new (Beta) versions are available, but their link to the old is also dead.  As is their link to the new connection https://new.findagrave.com/

“The easiest way to get to the new site is to go to the old one and then click where it says “Changes are coming to Find A Grave. See a preview now.” Or, you can click here. When you get to the new page, a window will pop up telling you a bit about why the website is changing…

The search feature is quite different looking though seems to provide the same options…

Do know that both the original and the Beta version are fully workable.  You can use either platform to make changes to existing memorials or add new memorials…

REMEMBER – your feedback on the Beta site is both encouraged and welcome!”

 

Thursday, March 23, 2017

The New and Improved Find A Grave Shown at #RootsTech
(click here to read the whole article:)

At RootsTech 2017 Peter Drinkwater showed off a late-alpha prototype for a new Find A Grave website. …

Peter Drinkwater is the general manager for Find A Grave, a website owned by Ancestry. While the session was titled “Getting to Know the New Find A Grave,” Peter first helped us get to know the old Find A Grave. Find A Grave was created in 1995 by Jim Tipton. “Jim Tipton lived here in Salt Lake and he had a hobby of collecting dirt from famous people’s graves,” Peter said. “He created Find A Grave as a place to document that and let other people share the locations of [famous] graves.” In 2000 he added the ability to document the graves of ordinary people. In January 2017 there were 157 million graves. For all those years, the website looked almost the same.

“…Why would we make a change, he asked? The code is quite old and there aren’t many developers who are comfortable in it. Modernizing the code will make it more secure, easier to work on, and make it possible to use new tools to improve the site.

The second reason to change it is to make it usable via a mobile device. More than 30% of visits to the site are on a tablet or phone. …

The third reason to change the site is to internationalize it, making it available in a variety of languages.

The goal of the initial project is to convert Find A Grave to new code, not to add new features.”

(Vicki’s note – Read how each database works to get a better idea on how to more effectively use it.  Here are excerpts from FindAGrave FAQs:)

Why is my information appearing on Ancestry sites?
Find A Grave is owned and supported by Ancestry.

Why do I have to register and become a member? I’m worried about my privacy.
You don’t have to register! You can search our database and visit millions of memorials and photos without registering. If you choose to ADD anything to our database, we require that you register so we can keep track of who is adding what. When you register, we require that you use a valid email in case we need to contact you regarding your submissions.

What is a photo volunteer?
A photo volunteer is someone who is willing to take photos of headstones within a given zip code.
To become a photo volunteer, log in and go to your Contributor Profile page.

What is a photo request?
A photo request is tied to the photo volunteer program. If you would like to request a headstone photo of a memorial, just go to the memorial on Find A Grave. Click on the ‘Request A Photo’ button. This will bring up a new screen allowing you to add any notes that may help the photo volunteer locate the grave location within the cemetery.

…Depending on the cemetery location and the number of volunteers in the area, it may take a few weeks or even longer for the photo request to be fulfilled. NOTE: If the memorial record does not have specific information regarding the grave’s plot/location in the cemetery, please contact the cemetery office (if one is listed) to obtain the plot location and add it to your email. Many cemetery offices will only provide that information to relatives of the deceased and will not assist photo volunteers with finding the grave’s location.

How can I get a copy of my relative’s death certificate?
In the United States, death certificates are usually public record and can be obtained for a nominal fee from state/county departments of public record (often called the Office of Vital Records). Try performing a Google search on the state where your loved one passed away and the term “death certificate.”
You can try the CDC website for more specifics by state.

Why can’t I find the person I’m looking for?
It is possible your search is too narrow. Broaden your search by removing things like a middle name or burial location. If you still can not find them, it is possible the person is not yet memorialized on Find A Grave. Find A Grave is a work in progress and documenting all burials worldwide is a massive undertaking for the membership.

If you are adding a memorial for someone who has recently passed or who does not have a physical grave or memorial marker in a cemetery (perhaps their ashes were scattered), please do a general search on Find A Grave (do not enter a location) to see if a memorial has already been created for that person. If you find a memorial has been added but has incomplete or incorrect information, instead of creating a duplicate memorial use the tools provided to submit corrections, additions or a transfer request via the “Suggest A Correction” link under the ‘Edit’ tab on the upper right of the memorial.

What if the cemetery isn’t listed for the names I want to add? How do I add a cemetery to the list?
We have a fairly comprehensive database of cemeteries in the United States. Please perform a search from our cemetery search page to make sure the cemetery is not already in our database. Include adjacent counties and other names which the cemetery may be known by as names do change over time.

What is a cenotaph? How do I have a memorial designated as a cenotaph?

A cenotaph is a marker within a cemetery placed in honor of a person whose remains are buried elsewhere. It may also be the original marker for someone who has since been re-interred elsewhere. To add a cenotaph, create a memorial.

What about the privacy of living family members?
An individual’s right to privacy disappears when they are deceased. The opinions of the relatives of the deceased fall on all sides of the question. Some people are angry to find a loved one when they come to Find A Grave, even if the memorial was added by another relative, as is usually the case, and some people are elated and send us notes of thanks for building an online memorial to their family member. If an immediate family member contacts us and wants information removed, we generally do so as a matter of respect for their wishes but we treat each request on a case by case basis. The names of living survivors will be removed from the biography section of a memorial upon request.

How does Find A Grave define ‘famous’?
Do not confuse importance with fame. Every ancestor is important and every veteran deserves to be remembered and honored. However, that does not mean that they are ‘famous’. An individual is more likely to be designated as ‘famous’ if they were well known outside of their local community.

…the “famous” section and each memorial placed into it are the sole domain of Find a Grave Administration. All famous memorials are maintained and controlled in every aspect by our staff, and cannot be transferred to anyone, even relatives.

Can I add a memorial for my pet?
Yes, when we say we want to list the burial locations of everyone, we’re not kidding. Pets are an important part of many of our lives and their deaths can be a great loss.
You may want to use your family’s last name as the pet’s last name, to make it easier to find the memorial at a later date.
If the pet is buried in a pet cemetery, the memorial is listed as such. …or if the pet was buried in the backyard or other non-cemetery location…

…married names for a woman’s memorial when she was married more than once?
The ‘last name’ is the name that is on the headstone. Include other married names as part of the biography section. The ‘maiden name’ is only for her maiden name.

First: Infant
Middle: Twin Son or Daughter
Last: Doe

How do I update or correct an error in memorial data?
You can submit updates or corrections of factual information for any memorial by clicking on the ‘Edit’ tab on the memorial in question. Be sure you are logged in.
From here you can select one of the following options:

Birth/death date, birth/death place
Relationship (parent and spouse links)
Name
Plot and/or GPS
Marker Transcription
Suggest any other correction or addition

The first five options allow you to make the factual update to the memorial. Once this is submitted, the manager of the memorial will receive this information as an editing request and will either approve it or decline it.

How do I clean a headstone?
Unless you are related to the interred on the headstone in question, DO NOT do anything to the headstone.

Never clean gravestones with anything but water and a soft brush. Slate gravestones from the Revolutionary era and Pre-revolutionary era are best left alone due to their delicate nature and tendency to erode.

Never apply bleach, ammonia, shaving cream, chalk, flour, baking soda, cornstarch, firm pressure or use anything abrasive. Do not post photos of recently chalked or shaving-creamed headstones.

Consult a professional before any attempt to clean a headstone is made.

Reporting chalking: Photos of chalked, floured, shaving creamed, wire brushed, or otherwise altered headstones are strictly not allowed and are subject to removal when reported and/or when spotted by an administrator….

The Find A Grave web site is free, however Find A Grave uses advertising to support the cost of operations….

Who is behind Find A Grave?
Who is behind Find A Grave? Well, first and foremost, you are. Thousands of contributors submit new listings, updates, corrections, photographs and virtual flowers every hour. The site simply wouldn’t exist without the million+ contributors.

Preparatory Schools Were the Early High Schools

Preparatory Schools

Were the Early High Schools

Vicki’s note – This information about the Beloit Seminary/Preparatory/Academy is quoted from the online Beloit College Archives site. 

Hints:

-We can often find information about the local history of a locality at a college near that community. If you are lucky, the information may be on-line.

-The locations of institutions may change locations  from one building/address to another through it’s history.

-Depending on the time period, you may have to look for alternatives for where your ancestor went to “high” school. “Many preparatory schools were opened across the country due to the lack of public high schools in certain areas. Once high schools were built many preparatory schools closed. “

-There is a lot of information in print that you will not find on-line i.e. “approximately 6 linear feet (10 boxes, including oversize flat boxes, loose documents)”.

-An institution may have it’s origins very early in the history of a community, and it may not have actually been established right away.  I.E.  Beloit was first settled in 1836  – “The origins of the Academy stem from the Beloit Seminary, an institution that itself began life in the form of a charter written in 1837, but did not actually form until 1843.”

– Women may have combined or separate schools; and nearby communities (even across state lines) may have organizational connections.  “…1849. However, after it became the Academy women were no longer allowed to attend. At that time the Rockford Female Seminary (Rockford, Illinois) was opened.”

 

 

“The Beloit Academy, also called the Preparatory Department, evolved from the Beloit Seminary in 1849. However, after it became the Academy women were no longer allowed to attend. At that time the Rockford Female Seminary (Rockford, Illinois) was opened. Classes were held in the basement of a new church nearby until the chapel was completed on campus. The Academy prepared men for entrance into Beloit College or other colleges. Many preparatory schools were opened across the country due to the lack of public high schools in certain areas. Once high schools were built many preparatory schools closed. Until the Academy closed in 1910, enrollment in the Academy usually exceeded the college enrollment.

Beloit College Academy Records (AC 16) Beloit College Archives:

https://www.beloit.edu/archives/documents/archival_collections/beloitacademy/

This collection contains Beloit Academy (also called the Preparatory Department) administrative materials such as student registers, grade books, and catalogues, as well as publications (Junta Climax) and alumni correspondence and other materials created by Academy students.  Additionally, there is a compilation of transcripts of articles and meeting minute excerpts concerning the Academy, gathered by Beloit College Professor Robert K. Richardson.

The Beloit College Academy, at one time called the Preparatory Department, was a preparatory school for Beloit College from around 1848 to 1910. It originally focused on study of the classics, and then grew to also include courses in business, English, and science.

The origins of the Academy stem from the Beloit Seminary, an institution that itself began life in the form of a charter written in 1837, but did not actually form until 1843…”

Using The Official Federal Land Records Site to Find Your Ancestor’s Land

Vicki’s note –

The United States Government has a lot of websites that have records you might not think of.  Look at all of the possibilities.  These will help you find your ancestors and are free.

Welcome to the Bureau of Land Management(BLM), General Land Office (GLO) Records Automation web site.
I clicked on “Search Documents” below to look for records of one of  the first settlers in Troy, Walworth County, Wisconsin (1836) after it became surveyed for land acquisition.  These four pieces of land are what I found.  Major Jesse Meacham’s  first patent (land bought from the United States government) is dated 3/25/1841.:
Clicking on the first piece of land took me to this map with township, meridian, etc.:
The Official Federal Land Records Site
Welcome to the Bureau of Land Management(BLM), General Land Office (GLO) Records Automation web site. We provide live access to Federal land conveyance records for the Public Land States, including image access to more than five million Federal land title records issued between 1788 and the present. We also have images of survey plats and field notes, land status records, and control document index records. Due to organization of documents in the GLO collection, this site does not currently contain every Federal title record issued for the Public Land States.
Bureau of Land Management - General Land Office Records
Sample Homestead Patent Federal Land Patents offer researchers a source of information on the initial transfer of land titles from the Federal government to individuals. In addition to verifying title transfer, this information will allow the researcher to associate an individual (Patentee, Assignee, Warrantee, Widow, or Heir) with a specific location (Legal Land Description) and time (Issue Date). We have a variety of Land Patents on our site, including Cash Entry, Homestead and Military Warrant patents.

Sample Plat Survey plats are part of the official record of a cadastral survey. Surveying is the art and science of measuring the land to locate the limits of an owner’s interest thereon. A cadastral survey is a survey which creates, marks, defines, retraces or re-establishes the boundaries and subdivisions of Federal Lands of the United States. The survey plat is the graphic drawing of the boundaries involved with a particular survey project, and contains the official acreage to be used in the legal description.Sample Field Notes Field notes are the narrative record of the cadastral survey. They are written in tabular format and contain the detailed descriptions of entire survey process including the instrumentation and procedures utilized, calling all physical evidence evaluated in the survey process, and listing all of the individuals who participated in the work.

Sample Land Status Historical Index Land Status Records are used by BLM Western State Offices to document the ongoing state of a township’s Federal and private land regarding title, lease, rights, and usage. These documents include Master Title Plats, which are a composite of all Federal surveys for a township. Other Land Status Records include Use Plats, Historical Indices, and Supplemental Plats.
The Control Document Index includes BLM documents that affect or have affected the control, limitation, or restriction of public land and resources. CDI documents include public laws, proclamations, and withdrawals. CDI documents have been kept on microfilm since the 1950’s, but are now being scanned and linked to existing data records from BLM’s LR2000 database.
USA.GOV  |  No Fear Act  |  DOI  |  Disclaimer  |  About BLM  |  Notices  |  Get Adobe Reader®
Privacy Policy  |  FOIA  |  Kids Policy  |  Contact Us  |  Accessibility  |  Site Map  |  Home

Where are Probate Records?

Where are Probate Records?

Vicki’s note – A good reminder of the importance of Probate Records in proving the relationships of people. 

What are Probate Records? See this definition from Rock County Probate Court:

” Under the supervision of the Circuit Court, the Register in Probate oversees the administration of estates, “testamentary” trusts, guardianships, and mental health commitments. The Register in Probate also makes and keeps records of proceedings; and maintains records of wills admitted to probate, wills for safekeeping, guardianships, and mental health commitments.”

Currently, people do not have to go to Probate Court for a deceased person how has an estate of less than $50,000 in value, but there are other legal forms, or informal court proceedings that will be stored.  And there are more possible records to find – for guardianships and mental health commitments.

I have made good use of the recent addition of the Probate  materials added to Ancestry.com.  I did not know that Ancestry had been so systematic in approaching all of the county courthouses.  A newly added group of wills from Ohio proved the daughter/father status of one of my ancestor families.  Until then, I could not definitively prove their connection.

Hint – try to prove your ancestor’s facts in three different sources, including a primary source like a will.

Read the whole posting Finding Probate Records by Will Moneymaker in his BLOG AncestralFindings.com.

Finding Probate Records

“Probate records are some of the most valuable, informative genealogical records you will come across. There are several different kinds, and each one can tell you previously unknown things about your ancestors. You may find probate records that are simple inventories of estates, wills with varying amounts of personal information in them, and legal records from proving the will (and sometimes, contesting it). Probate records let you know what things your ancestors owned, how much money they had, how well they lived, and their family connections. If a will names children, grandchildren, parents, siblings, in-laws, and friends, as they often do, this information will allow you to confirm suspected relationships and learn new ones.

So, where do you find probate records? There are a few different places.

1. County Courthouses

County courthouses can contain probate records going back centuries…

2. Ancestry.com

Ancestry.com just added a huge new collection of probate records from around the United States this year. These are the same probate records you would find in county courthouses. Ancestry.com sent representatives out to county courthouses across the country to get the courthouses to allow them to digitize their probate records…

3. Older Relatives

If you have older relatives who have collected a large amount of family information over the decades, you should visit them and see what they have in their boxes, chests, and files… genealogical gold

4. State or Local Archive Buildings

Probate records from colonial times may be found in county courthouses, but are more often found in archive buildings. If you are looking for the probate records for an ancestor who lived in America before the American Revolution, visit or write to the historical society in the city, town, or county in which they lived….

Will founded Ancestral Findings back in 1995. He has been involved in genealogy research for over 20 years. The thrill of the hunt, the adventure, and the excitement begin when he started investigating the meaning of his Moneymaker surname. Why I Love Genealogy (And You Should, Too!)

How to Search an Address in Ancestry.com

How to Search an Address in Ancestry.com

by Vicki Ruthe Hahn

SGS Stateline Genealogy Sorter

9-14-2017

The question was – how do I find more information about a house (in Beloit WI)?

I just now discovered how to do that searching in Ancestry.com (Library edition at the Library.)

Note that I did not put any names of people in, nor did I use ” quote” marks on the address.  I got thousands of results when putting the address in “Place your ancestor might have lived”.  It seems to bring up all of Beloit, even when putting in the house number  and street name.  So that does not work.

The same happens if you put the address in “Lived in” or “Any Event” and “Location”.

What does work is to click “Match all terms exactly” AND put the complete address in “Keyword” and click “Exact”.  I did not even capitalize the street correctly.  You can select the entire correct entry when the typing prompts auto fill choices.

Ancestry.com keyword

Here were the results I got, which were all from 1930 U S Federal Census, even though I chose “All categories”.  The fifth person’s name was a different house number on Highland Ave.  I’m not sure why it was included, or why I did not get more hits.  Probably not enough Beloit City Directories, etc. loaded onto Ancestry yet. But this gives you some more people’s names to trace back the history of a house in City Directories, etc.:

Results 1–5 of 5

Name:  Louisa Devine
Birth:  abt 1860 – Wisconsin
Residence:  1930 – Beloit, Beloit, Rock, Wisconsin, USA
Name:  Archie Devine
Birth:  abt 1896 – Wisconsin
Residence:  1930 – Beloit, Beloit, Rock, Wisconsin, USA
Name:  Archie Devine
Birth:  abt 1919 – Wisconsin
Residence:  1930 – Beloit, Beloit, Rock, Wisconsin, USA
Name:  Frank Devine
Birth:  abt 1921 – Wisconsin
Residence:  1930 – Beloit, Beloit, Rock, Wisconsin, USA
Name:  John L Briggs
Birth:  abt 1906 – Michigan
Residence:  1930 – Beloit, Beloit, Rock, Wisconsin, USA
Other places to look, and ask for the Librarians to help.  I keep getting to know our Beloit Local history better the more I help folks.:

Historic Wisconsin buildings : a survey in pioneer architecture, 1835-1870

Perrin, Richard W. E., 1909-
[Milwaukee, Wis.] : Milwaukee Public Museum, 1981. 1981

Location Call No. Status
 Beloit Adult Non-Fiction  720.9775 P428h  ON SHELF
 Beloit Adult Non-Fiction  720.9775 P428h  ON SHELF

BOOK1981.

Other relevant

Other relevant titles

entries 3-9

3

Architectural and historical intensive survey report : City of Beloit, Wisconsin

Sheboygan, Wis. : Legacy Architecure, Inc. ; 2016. 2016

Location Call No. Status
 Beloit Genealogy & Local History  GEN 720.9775 Architectural 2015-2016  REFERENCE
And
Beloit City Directories and old phone books at the Library
And
29 Early Beloit City Directories, Phone books, and history books that are digitized online at the Beloit Public Library Homepage: “Beloitlibrary.org”  > “Discover< investigate, Grow” > “Genealogy and Local History” >

Beloit Local History Digitization

And

In the indexes of the “Book of Beloit 1836 – 1936” and “Book of Beloit II 1936-1986”.

And

In the local history pamphlet file.

And

On the many Beloit area historic maps that are in our Library Local History/Genealogy collection.