Category Archives: Internet Genealogy Searching

Rootsweb Surname List Ends Oct 24, 2017!

Vicki’s note – I just found this out.  Be sure and use this resource before it disappears. 

Rootsweb.com is the oldest & largest free award-winning Internet Genealogical community.  Searchable database.  Submit Your Family Tree free to WorldConnect Project (by using a GEDCOM).

I notice that it is now “an ancestry.com community”.  FindAGrave.com is also now owned by Ancestry.com.  So far it is still free.  I hope that Rootsweb.com continues to be free. 

10-22-2017

Rootsweb Surname List Ends Oct 24, 2017!

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http://home.rootsweb.ancestry.com/

rootsweb

“We will be discontinuing

the Rootsweb Surname List (RSL)

and Genealogy Forum

(found at http://genforum.rootsweb.ancestry.com)

features on Tuesday Oct 24, 2017.”

 

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Or it may just be moving to a different site:

 

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Using The Official Federal Land Records Site to Find Your Ancestor’s Land

Vicki’s note –

The United States Government has a lot of websites that have records you might not think of.  Look at all of the possibilities.  These will help you find your ancestors and are free.

Welcome to the Bureau of Land Management(BLM), General Land Office (GLO) Records Automation web site.
I clicked on “Search Documents” below to look for records of one of  the first settlers in Troy, Walworth County, Wisconsin (1836) after it became surveyed for land acquisition.  These four pieces of land are what I found.  Major Jesse Meacham’s  first patent (land bought from the United States government) is dated 3/25/1841.:
Clicking on the first piece of land took me to this map with township, meridian, etc.:
The Official Federal Land Records Site
Welcome to the Bureau of Land Management(BLM), General Land Office (GLO) Records Automation web site. We provide live access to Federal land conveyance records for the Public Land States, including image access to more than five million Federal land title records issued between 1788 and the present. We also have images of survey plats and field notes, land status records, and control document index records. Due to organization of documents in the GLO collection, this site does not currently contain every Federal title record issued for the Public Land States.
Bureau of Land Management - General Land Office Records
Sample Homestead Patent Federal Land Patents offer researchers a source of information on the initial transfer of land titles from the Federal government to individuals. In addition to verifying title transfer, this information will allow the researcher to associate an individual (Patentee, Assignee, Warrantee, Widow, or Heir) with a specific location (Legal Land Description) and time (Issue Date). We have a variety of Land Patents on our site, including Cash Entry, Homestead and Military Warrant patents.

Sample Plat Survey plats are part of the official record of a cadastral survey. Surveying is the art and science of measuring the land to locate the limits of an owner’s interest thereon. A cadastral survey is a survey which creates, marks, defines, retraces or re-establishes the boundaries and subdivisions of Federal Lands of the United States. The survey plat is the graphic drawing of the boundaries involved with a particular survey project, and contains the official acreage to be used in the legal description.Sample Field Notes Field notes are the narrative record of the cadastral survey. They are written in tabular format and contain the detailed descriptions of entire survey process including the instrumentation and procedures utilized, calling all physical evidence evaluated in the survey process, and listing all of the individuals who participated in the work.

Sample Land Status Historical Index Land Status Records are used by BLM Western State Offices to document the ongoing state of a township’s Federal and private land regarding title, lease, rights, and usage. These documents include Master Title Plats, which are a composite of all Federal surveys for a township. Other Land Status Records include Use Plats, Historical Indices, and Supplemental Plats.
The Control Document Index includes BLM documents that affect or have affected the control, limitation, or restriction of public land and resources. CDI documents include public laws, proclamations, and withdrawals. CDI documents have been kept on microfilm since the 1950’s, but are now being scanned and linked to existing data records from BLM’s LR2000 database.
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Free Sites on “doGenealogy”

Free Sites on “doGenealogy”

Vicki’s Note – I just heard about this new Site from “FamilyHistoryDaily.com” that  has volunteers gathering (Free) sites . 

Sounds a bit like what I do here on my BLOG under the Page/tab at the top of the BLOG – click on “Genealogy Links and Electronic Helps”.  There are many links there, and I will add a link to doGenealogy.

Click Here to read the Family History Daily article of sites and links on doGenealogy that are specifically on the subject of: “30 Free Genealogy Sites for Researching Your European Ancestry”

FamilyHistoryDaily has many more interesting articles on genealogy.

“About doGenealogy

doGenealogy is a new tool from Family History Daily that makes it easier than ever to locate no-cost genealogy research sites.

Because this is a brand new project we have many free sites still to add, check back regularly for these new resources.

While paid resources, like Ancestry.com, provide excellent services to family historians, there is a wealth of free genealogy data also available online.

doGenealogy offers a hand selected database of only high quality, completely free genealogy sites that will help you expand your research without spending a cent.

Thank you, as always, to the amazing volunteers who make these free family history resources possible.

Need research help? Try the helpful articles on Family History Daily.”

Comparing Genealogy Software and Online Trees

Vicki’s note – Family Tree Magazine – suggestions for purchase of software and online family history search databases.  Which one will work for you?

Read the whole article here.

Comparing Genealogy Software and Online Trees

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3 Helpful Charts About Genealogy Software and Online Trees

These three charts show you at-a-glance the features of genealogy software and family tree websites, and what programs and sites sync your data.

It doesn’t take too long for those of us who love genealogy to realize we need tools to keep track of our family trees—the names, dates, places, how people are related, sources of all that information, etc. etc.

In addition to organizing information, such tools can help you find records and family trees on genealogy websites, create family tree charts and share your research.

At-a-Glance Genealogy Software and Online Tree Info

In that case, here’s a chart from the October/November 2017 Family Tree Magazine (which is starting to mail to subscribers) that shows you at a glance which software and family tree sites sync.

This chart, also corrected, shows features of major desktop software options:
And this one—you guessed it, corrected—shows features of the major sites where you can keep your online tree (our Best Websites listing links to additional online tree sites):

Two Additional Genealogy Programs by Vicki Ruthe Hahn – Sept. 25 and Oct. 23, 2017 at NSLD, IL.

Two Additional Genealogy Programs by Vicki Ruthe Hahn –

Sept. 25 and Oct. 23, 2017 at NSLD, North Suburban Library District, Illinois:

These are both free 1 hour classes available to all.

NSLD/Loves Park

6340 N. Second St.

Loves Park, IL 61111

 

NSLD/Roscoe

5562 Clayton Circle

Roscoe, IL 61073

 

www.northsuburbanlibrarydistrict.org

Facebook.com/NorthSuburbanLibrary

 

“Family History for Beginners, and Detective Techniques for Experienced Genealogists”

Monday, September 25 from 2-3pm at NSLD Roscoe, Illinois

 

Effectively find the most that you can about your family history with hands-on exercises, and examples.  Be successful using basic genealogy research methods. Learn how to: search archives and on-line, record evidence, organize your genealogy, use timelines and “FAN” clubs, analyze records, and find missing clues based on what you know, etc.

 

 

Research Your Overseas Ancestors Without Going ‘Across the Pond’”

Monday, October 23 from 2-3 at NSLD Loves Park, Illinois

 

Learn how to find your immigrant ancestors’ information in U.S. records, in over-seas on-line genealogy databases, and in other, mostly-free, resources. How histories and maps help track their immigrations. What to do about language barriers. 

 

statelinegenealogyclub @ Beloit Public Library - Vicki RUTHE HAHN

Vicki Ruthe Hahn  – Public Services Librarian, Beloit Public Library, WI – BA and MLIS University of Illinois.  Blog creator of “StatelineGenealogyClub.Wordpress.com” 2014 ; founder of Stateline Genealogy Club @ Beloit Public Library 2012.  “Stateline Genealogy Sorter” SGS, with a background in Anthropology, History, clothing history, and teaching, she sorts out mysteries, rediscovers histories, weaves stories, and helps people with their family genealogy and local history,  specializing from Central Illinois to Central Wisconsin. 

 

Where is the Book on My Family?

Where is the Book on My Family?

Find Your Family Online in Digital Books

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Find Your Family Online in Digital Books

 

… Here are the best places to look for digital books about genealogy.

Google Books

Launched in 2004 as “Google Print,” Google Books now contains over 25 million scanned book titles.

Internet Archive

The appropriately-named Internet Archive began in 1996 with the goal of archiving the Internet, but the project soon expanded into providing digital versions of other published works. … Most books are offered in several different formats, including DAISY files for the print-disabled.

HathiTrust Digital Library

HathiTrust (pronounced “haw tea”) is a partnership of several academic and research institutions offering a collection of over 15 million titles from libraries around the world. Books that are uncopyrightable (i.e., some government works) or in the public domain …

FamilySearch

The Family History Books collection at FamilySearch contains more than 325,000 digitized genealogy and family history publications from the archives of family history libraries such as the Allen County Public Library and the Family History Library in Salt Lake City. …

MyHeritage: Compilation of Published Sources

One of MyHeritage’s best-kept secrets is their repository of digitized books. All are free to access, and you don’t even need to log in with a free account! …  To learn more about the digital books at MyHeritage watch the free Legacy webinar – Book Matching Technology at MyHeritage.

…Genealogy Gophers

Despite the funny name, Genealogy Gophers offers access to more than 80,000 digitized “family histories, regional and local histories, genealogy magazines, how-to books, gazetteers, newsletters, and medieval histories.” … developed specifically for “identifying real people named in genealogy books.”…

 

Elizabeth O’Neal is a freelance writer, educator, and web developer. An avid genealogist for three decades, Elizabeth writes the blog My Descendant’s Ancestors, where she shares family stories, technology and methodology tips, and hosts the monthly “Genealogy Blog Party.”

Come be Irish with me at the Milwaukee Irish Fest 2017

On Saturday, AUGUST 19, 2017

I will be doing 2 genealogy presentations, and helping festival goers with genealogy.

 


Aug 17 – Aug 20 · Milwaukee Irish Fest · Milwaukee
Music · 5,601 people
Vicki Ruthe Hahn
Doing these presentations:
at 1pm “IrishAncestors.net
Irish Genealogy
irishancestors.net

and 4pm “What They Wore When”

⇓⇓

On Saturday, August 19,

I went to the Irish Fest, learned a lot about specific Irish genealogy research, and had fun presenting my two programs and helping others with their genealogy.

This is the largest Irish Fest, and well worth going.

My sister and I went to the “Board School” and learned that Scotland means “Land of the Irish”.  Lots of interconnection historically between Ireland and Scotland.  Reminds me a bit of the Stateline connections between Illinois and Wisconsin 🙂

I never saw so many people dressed in kilts or in green before!  Too busy to take many photos, except these:

 

2017 Irish Fest Celtic Cross2017 Irish Fest Milwaukee2017 Irish Fest Vicki Hahn speaker2017 Irish Fest Vick Hahn & Melodie Alvarez, Milwaukee WIVicki Ruthe Hahn and sister Melodie Alvarez in front of “our castle” – found at the Milwaukee Irish Fest.

Heraldry and Titles of Rank

∞ Vicki’s note –

You get two related articles/sources in one Posting:

Interesting to read that Coat of Arms does not = Surname.  I still claim the few  Coats of Arms that I know associated with some of my ancestor’s surnames, and “my” Muir family castle in Ireland.

I think in America (U.S.A), that we don’t concern ourselves much with the conventions of heraldry and distinctions of  titles of rank.  I even saw places on-line where anyone can buy title of rank, so I think that the whole world’s attitude toward the (mostly former) formal distinctions is relaxing.

This is not to insult my BLOG’s British, Scottish, and Irish, etc. viewers.  I do realize that titles of rank are still very important and current in your cultures.

I am adding all of these links to my BLOG “Genealogy Links and Electronic Helps” page.

 

Wow – look at the rare gem of a website that I found today.

Read more about the Titles of Rank in this really extensive website.  After reading through these lists, I may have to reconsider my statement about “mostly former distinctions” above.  My anthropological and history background reminds me that humans have set up hierarchies and named distinctions as an on-going aspect of being part of human cultures.

There are a lot of wide-ranging lists here at – http://www.sunderedspheres.com/titles-of-rank.html

That website includes:

“Ranks of All Nations Possible” historic & modern – i.e.

Royal and Noble Ranks, Modern and Historic Military Ranks, Modern and Historic Political Ranks,  Modern and Historic Religious Hierarchy, Monastic ranks, Knights/Militant Ranks,  Historical Titles and Classes, Scots, Welsh, Irish, British, Byzantine, Estonian, French, Germanic, German, Saxon, Gothic, Greek, Hungarian, Italian, Languedoc (Southern French), Norse, Roman Empire, Russian, Slovenian, Spanish, Egyptian (Ancient), Hausa & Mali, Hindustani,  Islamic/Religious, Japanese, Mongol, Moorish, Persian, Semitic & Hebrew, Swahili, Turkic, Turkish, Chileno, United States, and Miscellaneous Ranks

The first part of that website states:

Titles of Rank

Ranks and their Definitions:

The following social ranks are given from highest to lowest instead of alphabetically.  The titles given are first male then female, and the etymology is terrestrial.  

AND

“Heraldry Websites for Genealogy”

is an article from FamilyTreeMagazine.com  on a topic that we don’t often see. Read the whole article here:

https://www.familytreemagazine.com/premium/heraldry-resources-online/

7/21/2017

Myth: Many surnames have a coat of arms.

Fact: Coats of arms are not attached to a surname, but rather to an individual. People with the same surname may be entitled to different coats of arms, or not have one at all, unless they can prove that they are directly descended from a legitimate male member of that line – or one is granted to them.

The American Heraldry Society

Heraldica

College of Arms

Heraldry for Genealogists 

Institute of Heraldic and Genealogical Studies—UK

American College of Heraldry

Coats of Arms from Ireland

 Game of Thrones.

On-line Name Indexes to County Histories And More

Vicki’s note – a very valuable resource that I just found on Facebook.com. Cathy L. O’Connor loves County History books as much as I do. Thank you Cathy.

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Cathy introduces her site –

“After discovering the value of every name indexes for, and being disappointed at the lack of free every name indexes available online, I began compiling and publishing my own.

This website was created to share my every name indexes with you so you can save valuable research time and easily locate your ancestors in those big old texts. I hope you find something here that helps you!

 

 

EveryNameIndex.com currently offers hundreds of free every name indexes covering 36 states.

To browse all the free indexes Click Here:

EveryNameIndex.com\

(Cathy also offers these multitude of other genealogy links:)

GENEALOGY Links

Here you will find lots of helpful genealogy links.  Many have assisted me in my personal genealogy research.  Some offer information, products, or services that may be of interest to you.  They are provided for your convenience.  I do not endorse or take responsiblity for the content, privacy practices, transactions, or other functions of these websites.

…..

Free Every Name Indexes for Old County Histories

 

Copyright 2007-2017. Cathy L. O’Connor. All rights reserved.

Website last updated on 01 May 2017.

Rural Cemetery Studies

Rural Cemetery Studies

7-3-2017

Vicki’s note – a quote I read from another on-line source that I found. I am including the entire addendum from the on-line book.  However, I could not find out who did the 2012 revision of this priceless 1970s publication.  My hat’s off to any and all (Find-a-grave, Boy Scout, etc.) volunteer photographers,  restorers, and researchers who find and preserve genealogical information for the rest of us.

I also love his quote about those ancestors, “…who dared to settle the prairie lands of western Illinois and raise their families.”

Read this just to know how lucky we are to have the Internet and computers to aid us in our research.

Hint – google on-line.  You may just find the very exact resource you need for the tiny area that you are researching.:

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RURAL CEMETERIES OF McDONOUGH COUNTY, ILLINOIS

VOLUME VII
NEW SALEM -ELDORADO
BY DUANE LESTER
GOOD HOPE, ILLINOIS
PRINTED BY
SCHUYLER –BROWN HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY
AND
THE SCHUYLER JAIL MUSEUM

http://genmarker.com/McDonough/RuralCemVols/Vol07Rev.pdf :

” a monument is erected not because a person died, but because a person lived”

“ADDENDUM
Mr. Lester’s Magnum Opus is nothing short of monumental. It is not easy to gain access to many of these historic family burial sites. By the time of Mr. Lester’s survey (1970’s) numerous plots were long left abandoned, overgrown with trees and weeds and monuments under attack by weather, livestock, vandals, and property owners who did not care about the burial sites of McDonough County’s brave pioneers.
Thankfully, we now (2012) have laws to protect our county’s historical legacy and these final resting gardens.
I am in awe of Mr. Lester for his transcriptions of hard – to – read tombstones and his laborious typing of his 18 Volumes of the Rural Cemeteries of McDonough County. He did not have access to a computer. In addition to transcribing information from tombstones, he had to painstakingly access county records (e.g. 1840 county tax list), federal census records, and local newspapers requiring a great deal of time and effort.
As a genealogist in 2012, I have access to the internet with fast access to US Census
records, Family Search (records kept by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter – Day Saints) and numerous other legal documents, books, and family journals.
Mr. Lester used an old-fashioned key – strike, ribbon tape typewriter where mistakes
were hard to correct and appear as overstrikes. There are very few attesting to his skill as a typist.
What an US Census record will not contain are the names and dates of infants who died between census surveys. Mr. Lester’s tombstone records give names and dates of children, whose lives were brief, but would otherwise be lost to history without his efforts. Frequently, he provides names of brothers and sisters, fathers and mothers that allows for completion of family group sheets.
Another work of love for those who dared to settle the prairie lands of western Illinois and raise their families is being performed by Dr. A. Gil Belles. He has been able to install signs for each of these rural cemeteries and provide GPS (Global Positioning System) information making it easier for anyone wishing to visit a rural cemetery to help them actually find it.
Gil also works closely with Boy Scouts and other civic groups to help cleanup, clear brush and dead trees, locate buried tombstones, and restore stones. My revision of Mr. Lester’s document will provide information on all cemetery restoration projects.
Any changes made to Mr. Lester’s original work was done in blue color font. His maps were scanned and copied into the text and remain like his original work and are not subject to editing.
His text was transcribed using MS Word, enabling me to control font size and color. Retyping text also leaves room for typo errors. Mr. Lester’s rare typo errors are corrected but not displayed in blue. This MS Word document allows on -the – fly editing of any “Notes, Corrections, Additions, and Changes” found at the end of every cemetery. This was Mr. Lester’s intent to produce a working document and improve accuracy about the information on those buried.
I have retyped state abbreviations as they are now used (e.g. IL, instead of Ill.). On 1840 county tax lists I omitted cents (e.g. $140, instead of $140.00). The current MS Word font uses less space, thus, placing more text per line. This shrinks his documents and reduces pages. This , then, changes page numbering in each Table of Contents.
Cemetery locations are also found on the internet. See: McDonough County Illinois Cemeteries http://graveyards.com/graveyards/IL/McDonough