Category Archives: Scots Ancestors

Two Additional Genealogy Programs by Vicki Ruthe Hahn – Sept. 25 and Oct. 23, 2017 at NSLD, IL.

Two Additional Genealogy Programs by Vicki Ruthe Hahn –

Sept. 25 and Oct. 23, 2017 at NSLD, North Suburban Library District, Illinois:

These are both free 1 hour classes available to all.

NSLD/Loves Park

6340 N. Second St.

Loves Park, IL 61111

 

NSLD/Roscoe

5562 Clayton Circle

Roscoe, IL 61073

 

www.northsuburbanlibrarydistrict.org

Facebook.com/NorthSuburbanLibrary

 

“Family History for Beginners, and Detective Techniques for Experienced Genealogists”

Monday, September 25 from 2-3pm at NSLD Roscoe, Illinois

 

Effectively find the most that you can about your family history with hands-on exercises, and examples.  Be successful using basic genealogy research methods. Learn how to: search archives and on-line, record evidence, organize your genealogy, use timelines and “FAN” clubs, analyze records, and find missing clues based on what you know, etc.

 

 

Research Your Overseas Ancestors Without Going ‘Across the Pond’”

Monday, October 23 from 2-3 at NSLD Loves Park, Illinois

 

Learn how to find your immigrant ancestors’ information in U.S. records, in over-seas on-line genealogy databases, and in other, mostly-free, resources. How histories and maps help track their immigrations. What to do about language barriers. 

 

statelinegenealogyclub @ Beloit Public Library - Vicki RUTHE HAHN

Vicki Ruthe Hahn  – Public Services Librarian, Beloit Public Library, WI – BA and MLIS University of Illinois.  Blog creator of “StatelineGenealogyClub.Wordpress.com” 2014 ; founder of Stateline Genealogy Club @ Beloit Public Library 2012.  “Stateline Genealogy Sorter” SGS, with a background in Anthropology, History, clothing history, and teaching, she sorts out mysteries, rediscovers histories, weaves stories, and helps people with their family genealogy and local history,  specializing from Central Illinois to Central Wisconsin. 

 

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Heraldry and Titles of Rank

∞ Vicki’s note –

You get two related articles/sources in one Posting:

Interesting to read that Coat of Arms does not = Surname.  I still claim the few  Coats of Arms that I know associated with some of my ancestor’s surnames, and “my” Muir family castle in Ireland.

I think in America (U.S.A), that we don’t concern ourselves much with the conventions of heraldry and distinctions of  titles of rank.  I even saw places on-line where anyone can buy title of rank, so I think that the whole world’s attitude toward the (mostly former) formal distinctions is relaxing.

This is not to insult my BLOG’s British, Scottish, and Irish, etc. viewers.  I do realize that titles of rank are still very important and current in your cultures.

I am adding all of these links to my BLOG “Genealogy Links and Electronic Helps” page.

 

Wow – look at the rare gem of a website that I found today.

Read more about the Titles of Rank in this really extensive website.  After reading through these lists, I may have to reconsider my statement about “mostly former distinctions” above.  My anthropological and history background reminds me that humans have set up hierarchies and named distinctions as an on-going aspect of being part of human cultures.

There are a lot of wide-ranging lists here at – http://www.sunderedspheres.com/titles-of-rank.html

That website includes:

“Ranks of All Nations Possible” historic & modern – i.e.

Royal and Noble Ranks, Modern and Historic Military Ranks, Modern and Historic Political Ranks,  Modern and Historic Religious Hierarchy, Monastic ranks, Knights/Militant Ranks,  Historical Titles and Classes, Scots, Welsh, Irish, British, Byzantine, Estonian, French, Germanic, German, Saxon, Gothic, Greek, Hungarian, Italian, Languedoc (Southern French), Norse, Roman Empire, Russian, Slovenian, Spanish, Egyptian (Ancient), Hausa & Mali, Hindustani,  Islamic/Religious, Japanese, Mongol, Moorish, Persian, Semitic & Hebrew, Swahili, Turkic, Turkish, Chileno, United States, and Miscellaneous Ranks

The first part of that website states:

Titles of Rank

Ranks and their Definitions:

The following social ranks are given from highest to lowest instead of alphabetically.  The titles given are first male then female, and the etymology is terrestrial.  

AND

“Heraldry Websites for Genealogy”

is an article from FamilyTreeMagazine.com  on a topic that we don’t often see. Read the whole article here:

https://www.familytreemagazine.com/premium/heraldry-resources-online/

7/21/2017

Myth: Many surnames have a coat of arms.

Fact: Coats of arms are not attached to a surname, but rather to an individual. People with the same surname may be entitled to different coats of arms, or not have one at all, unless they can prove that they are directly descended from a legitimate male member of that line – or one is granted to them.

The American Heraldry Society

Heraldica

College of Arms

Heraldry for Genealogists 

Institute of Heraldic and Genealogical Studies—UK

American College of Heraldry

Coats of Arms from Ireland

 Game of Thrones.

“Scots-Irish” – What’s in a Name?

“Scots-Irish” – What’s in a Name?

Vicki’s note – now I know what the name “Scots-Irish”  means.  I will have to see if my ancestors are truly Scots who emigrated  to Ulster, Ireland vs the miscellaneous Scottish and Irish folks that I know about.

This Class from Family Tree University would be valuable to learn those fine points.  Course Runs: Jun 26th 2017 – Jul 21st 2017.

Instructor – Amanda Epperson

Amanda Epperson completed her Ph.D. in Scottish History at the University of Glasgow. In addition to teaching and freelance writing, she works as an Editor and Researcher at Genealogists.com.

 

What’s in a Name?
scots_irish

The term “Scots-Irish” isn’t anyone who happens to have both Irish and Scottish descendants. It refers to the Scottish people who moved into Ireland in the 17th Century in and around Ulster. Because there were two migrations – first from Scotland to Ireland, then from Ireland to the Americas, those tracing their ancestors back have unique challenges to contend with.

Research Your Scots-Irish Family History

Research Your Scots-Irish Family History

Trace Your Scots-Irish Ancestry Back to Ulster


The term “Scots-Irish” refers to the descendants of Scottish people who emigrated to Ulster in the seventeenth century to take advantage of economic opportunities. By the beginning of the eighteenth century, an estimated one-third of Ulster’s population was Scottish.

In this four week course, you will gain a basic understanding of the settlement of Ulster in the seventeenth century and the migration of the Ulster-Scots people to America in the seventeenth century. Descriptions of records and lists of websites will help you find many of the documents required to trace your Scots-Irish ancestors back to Ireland. You will also gain an appreciation for the challenges of Irish research. Review exercises and discussion prompts will encourage you to start your research and engage with your classmates.

What You’ll Learn

  • History of the settlement of Ulster and of Scots-Irish migration
  • How to identify Scots-Irish ancestors
  • Understand the limitations of Irish research
  • How to find Irish records
  • Techniques for scaling brick walls


Course Outline

Lesson 1: Ulster Scots: Gaining a Foundation

  1. Introduction
  2. Where is Ulster?
    Province of Ulster
    Northern Ireland
  3. Who are the Ulster Scots?
  4. Settlement of Ulster
  5. Migration to and from Ulster
  6. Cultural Differences in Ulster
  7. Review Exercises

Scots-Irish Genealogy Search Strategies

Lesson 2: Begin Your Research

  1. Why is Scots-Irish different than Irish or Scottish genealogy research?
  2. Do I have Scots-Irish Ancestors?
    6 different clues to Scots-Irish Heritage
  3. Working Backwards to Prove Your Scots-Irish Ancestry
    Getting Ready for Ulster Records
  4. Where to Find the Data You Need
    A study of 8 different sources
  5. Review Exercises

Lesson 3: Digging Deeper – Researching in Ulster

  1. Records in two Countries
    Northern Ireland
    Republic of Ireland
  2. Record Destruction and Irish Genealogy
    This section will explore both the 1922 fire and various difficulties of finding records, plus the resources that are available to research, including online collections.
  3. How Irish Records are Divided
    Unlike US records which can be at the state or county level, exploring Ulster’s records involves knowing the five different levels of records.
  4. Records for Ulster / Northern Ireland
    Familiarize yourself with 9 different types of records for Ulster and Northern Ireland.
  5. Where to Find the Records
  6. Review Exercises

Lesson 4: Challenges to Your Research

  1. Brick Walls and Dead Ends
  2. Cluster Genealogy
    What is it?
    Why is it necessary for Ulster genealogy?
  3. Exhausting Your Options
    Your records research doesn’t stop with online records – even if you can’t make a trip overseas, these 6 research strategies will help you find everything you can.
  4. Research in Scotland
    Explore the Scots in Scots-Irish.
  5. No Ulster or Scottish Connections? Read relevant histories.
  6. Re-evaluation and Analysis
    No research is complete without these 3 steps.
  7. Review Exercises

Note: this course is best for advanced beginners and intermediate-level family historians. It may require a longer time commitment than similar courses to complete the lessons and exercises.

Our courses are designed to be easily accessible! Once you’ve registered for the course, you’ll be able to log in on the start date of the session (midnight on Monday, US Mountain time) to see all the lessons. Each lesson is available within your browser and can be downloaded for future reference or offline access.

This is a four-week course made up primarily of written lessons, quizzes, and reading assignments. You can work at your own pace, but you should expect to devote at least a few hours to each lesson. While designed to be done one per week, some people like to work through all of the lessons at once, two at a time, or in bursts. There are no audio or visual elements within the primary lesson materials; however, some additional reading assignments may contain links to YouTube or other videos.

Some courses may have assignments you can also do with the instructor providing feedback. Others have additional reading and may be up to the individual instructor.

Additionally, there is a discussion board where you can interact with your instructor and fellow students. We encourage discussion, asking questions, and trying out what you’ve learned and sharing your results in the boards that go along with the lessons.

The format for this course is as follows:

  1. Orientation/Syllabus/Contact Us – How to navigate through the course structure, the discussion boards, etc.
  2. Lesson 1: Lesson, Reading/Assignment, Quizzes
  3. Lesson 2: Lesson, Reading/Assignment, Quizzes
  4. Lesson 3: Lesson, Reading/Assignment, Quizzes
  5. Lesson 4: Lesson, Reading/Assignment, Quizzes
  6. Library and Further Steps

The quizzes are automatically graded as you go through and there is a drop down menu where you can navigate throughout the course, going back to other lessons.


Scottish Genealogy 101 online class

Vicki’s note – and to continue our Scots – Irish genealogy – here is a helpful on-line course ($99) by FamilyTree University.  And a free Scotland National Archives link at the end of the Posting.

Scottish Genealogy Research Strategies

Scottish Genealogy Research Strategies

Scotland’s colorful history and efforts to preserve their heritage is a boon to any family historian with Scottish ancestry. If you’re one of the many descendants of the 1.5 million Scots who immigrated to the Americas, you can learn how to find your ancestors before they ever left Scotland with this 4-week course. From Scottish names and locations and historical events that triggered immigration, to the types of records you can expect to find and which archives, collections, websites, libraries and museums house the information, you’ll learn how to trace your ancestry.

Learn how to find your Scottish ancestry with this 4-week course on genealogy research methods in Scotland. From Scottish names, locations and historical events that triggered immigration, to the types of records you can expect to find and which archives, collections, websites, libraries and museums house that information, you’ll learn how to trace your ancestry.

  • How to find Scottish ancestors by name
  • How to use geography to narrow down your results
  • How Scottish history affected emigration patterns
  • How to use passenger lists to track emigration
  • What types of records are available online
  • How to use libraries and museum collections in your research
  • How to find which archives may contain the info you need

Click on the Course Outline tab to see the syllabus for the full 4 weeks!

Scottish Genealogy Research Strategies


Course Outline

Lesson 1: Getting Started with Your Scottish Research

Finding the names and locations of your Scottish ancestors, and understanding the impact of Scottish history on emigration patterns.

  1. Find Your Ancestors
  2. Know Your Geography
  3. Search by Name
  4. Emigration from Scotland
    1. Penal Transportation
    2. Passenger Vessels Acts
    3. Emigration Schemes
    4. Lowland Clearances
    5. Better Job Prospects
    6. Child Immigration

Lesson 2: Common Types of Records

Learn the types of records you can expect to encounter, along with the types of information they contain.

  1. Old Parish Registers
  2. Statutory Records
  3. Wills and Testaments
  4. Church Records
  5. Incorporating Those Records into Your Family Tree

Lesson 3: Digging Deeper

Using library and museum collections in your search.

  1. Library
    1. National Library of Scotland
      • i.Books and Guides
      • ii.Directories and Lists
      • iii.Newspapers
      • iv.Estate Papers
      • v.Maps
    2. The Mitchell Library in Glasgow
    3. Innerpeffray
    4. Dundee Central Library
    5. Edinburgh Central Library
  2. Museums
    1. Edinburgh Museum
    2. People’s Palace
    3. Strathnayer Museum
    4. Timespan Museum
    5. Scottish Mining Museum
    6. New Lanark World Heritage Site
    7. Summerless Industrial Museum
    8. Regimental Museums
    9. Local Family History Societies

Lesson 4: Offline Resources for Scottish Genealogy Research

There are plenty of records and collections that that you can incorporate into your research, even if you can’t go to Scotland yourself.

  1. National Records of Scotland/The National Archives
  2. Local Archives
  3. Examples of Local Archives
  4. University Archives
  5. Other Collections of Interest

scotlands

 

More on My Muir Family

Vicki’s Note – I was thrilled to have my sisters share this page on Facebook about our Muir Family.  This is where I would go if I ever get to visit Scotland.  You can read my previous Post about our Muir Family by searching “muir” on This BLOG.  The family was Scots – Irish.  Hummmm – writers; historians.  That’s familiar.

 

Antiquities, coins, ruins and castles – An all original, photo-rich Tumblr

Rowallan Castle, Scotland

This grand Renaissance mansion is based around a late 13th century tower house. Extended over the centuries that followed, it was the home of the influential Muir family who counted writers, historians, and composers amongst their number; the earliest lute music to survive in Scotland was written at Rowallan.

The castle is located near Kilmaurs, about 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) north of Kilmarnock, East Ayrshire, Scotland.

Four Resources for Scots-Irish (Ulster) Ancestors

Vicki’s Note – 11-24-2016 article from FamilyTreeMagazine.com by Diane Haddad:

Four Resources for Scots-Irish (Ulster) Ancestors

A two-step immigration process–from Scotland to Ulster and then to America, separated by a century or two–complicates your research into Scots-Irish (also called Ulster-Scots) ancestors, as do record losses and sometimes a lack of records in Ireland.

But records do exist:

Learn more about researching your Scots-Irish ancestors in Research Your Scots-Irish Family History, a four-week online course starting Nov. 28. Get an overview of this course and sign up at FamilyTreeUniversity.com.

Trace Your Scots-Irish Ancestry Back to Ulster


The term “Scots-Irish” refers to the descendants of Scottish people who emigrated to Ulster in the seventeenth century to take advantage of economic opportunities. By the beginning of the eighteenth century, an estimated one-third of Ulster’s population was Scottish.

In this four week course, you will gain a basic understanding of the settlement of Ulster in the seventeenth century and the migration of the Ulster-Scots people to America in the seventeenth century. Descriptions of records and lists of websites will help you find many of the documents required to trace your Scots-Irish ancestors back to Ireland. You will also gain an appreciation for the challenges of Irish research. Review exercises and discussion prompts will encourage you to start your research and engage with your classmates.

Take the class to answer these questions and others:

Why is Scots-Irish different than Irish or Scottish genealogy research?

Where is Ulster? Province of Ulster Northern Ireland

Scots-Irish Genealogy Search Strategies