Tag Archives: Diane Haddad

Apps for Cemetery Visits

Apps for Cemetery Visits

Vicki’s note – article from FamilyTreeMagazine.com

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6/29/2017
Take your genealogy research into the field with these great cemetery apps.

Smartphones and cemeteries go together like ice cream and Grandma’s apple pie. Without your phone, you’d have to pack a map, GPS device, laptop and camera to get around the cemetery, type inscriptions and take pictures. Your phone lets you do it all with one pocket-sized device.

Apps especially designed for cemetery visitors make it easier to accomplish all this (although if the cemetery is remote, see what the app lets you do when you’re offline). Some of these apps focus on exploring particular cemeteries; others cover multiple burial places. Use the URLs provided here to learn more about each app, and download the app from your device’s app store.

And if you’re visiting a large historic cemetery, it’s a good idea to plug its name into your smartphone’s app store. Some of these cemeteries have their own apps to help you navigate the grounds and locate gravesites.

ANC Explorer

iOS, Android • free

This app, introduced in 2012, helps you explore the rich history of Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va. Use it to search for gravesites and other points of interest, get step-by-step directions, view photos of markers and monuments, and follow self-guided tours. You can save photos and favorite places in the new My Content area. The app also delivers notifications of special events and makes it easy to share your photos on social media.

On-site visitors can download the app using the cemetery’s free WiFi in the Welcome Center and Administration Building, or use it at kiosks throughout the cemetery.

BillionGraves

iOS, Android, Windows • free

The BillionGraves website, launched in 2011, introduced its app to allow members to upload gravestone images along with GPS location data to its online cemetery database. There, others can transcribe the inscriptions (unlike on Find A Grave, no one “owns,” a memorial, so any BillionGraves member can contribute to it). You also can search for relatives’ burial sites among the 20.5 million-plus on the site, and be led right there, courtesy of the GPS coordinates.

Find A Grave

iOS, Android • free

Ancestry.com developed this companion app to genealogy’s best-known cemetery website after acquiring the site in 2013. Use it to search for burial information and gravestone images among the 160 million online memorials volunteers have logged at Find A Grave. When you’re visiting a cemetery, the app lets you upload inscription data and photos of graves you visit, and fulfill others’ requests for pictures of their ancestors’ gravesites.

Historic Oakland Cemetery

iOS, Android • free ($1.99 upgrade)

This app takes cemetery visitors on a tour of more than 60 points of interest throughout Atlanta’s Oakland Cemetery, including the “Original Six Acres,” historic African American and Jewish burial grounds, the Confederate section, and others. Photos and narration accompany each landmark. The app includes 10 free landmarks; upgrade to unlock all of them.

iCemetery

iOS • free

Canadians will find this app handy for searching for loved ones in cemeteries from six locations in Canada, including Woodlawn Cemetery in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan; and Mountain View Cemetery in Vancouver, British Columbia. View details such as the deceased’s name, date of death and burial date and location on a high-resolution map, along with your current GPS location. For many records, the app also provides GPS coordinates and displays the grave on a map to help you find it.

Locate Cemetery

Android • free

Got a hankering to see a cemetery? This simple app lets you find and navigate to cemeteries near your location or another place you specify.

Normandy American Cemetery

iOS, Android • free

Ten thousand Americans who perished during the Allied invasion of Normandy in World War II now rest eternally at Normandy American Cemetery in France. Whether you’re visiting in person or from home, this free smartphone app from the American Battle Monuments Commission lets you tour the cemetery, search burials, view military unit histories and learn the stories of those buried. Apps featuring Pointe du Hoc in Normandy and Cambridge American Cemetery in England are also available for download.

War Graves

iOS, Android • free

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s free War Graves app lets you search for graves of 1.7 million British casualties of the World Wars in more than 23,000 cemeteries, memorials and other locations in 153 countries. A directions function helps you find your way, or tap Cemeteries Nearby to find war graves within five miles of your current location. To find a specific gravesite, start with the Find a Cemetery function.

A version of this article originally appeared in the July/August 2017 issue of Family Tree Magazine.

Free – Watch Southern California Genealogical Society’s Genealogy Jamboree Sessions

Vicki’s note – article from 6-15-2017 Family Tree e- magazine genealogyinsider by Diane Haddad:

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Free – Watch Southern California Genealogical Society’s Genealogy Jamboree Sessions

Through July 10th 2017 –

The Southern California Genealogical Society’s Genealogy Jamboree just wrapped up, and you can watch recorded classes online for free through July 10. First, register at the Jamboree 2017 Livestream Registration Page. You’ll get an email with login information and a link to view videos on topics such as finding immigrant ancestors’ stories, Facebook for genealogy and deciphering foreign-language records.

Civil War Soldier Genealogy Records

Vicki’s note – Diane Haddad answers a question from a FamilyTreeMagazine.com reader:

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Find Genealogy Records for a Civil War Soldier

5/16/2017
You’ve got questions about discovering, preserving and celebrating your family history; our experts have the answers.
Q. All I know is that my great-grandfather Joseph A. Harbison fought for the Union in the Civil War. He enlisted from Pennsylvania. How do I get information about him?

 

A.The National Park Service has given you a great place to start in its Civil War Soldiers and Sailors Database (CWSS). You can search for Union or Confederate soldiers and African-American Union sailors. Our search turned up a Joseph H. Harbison in the 11th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry. Is this your great-grandfather with an incorrect middle initial? Before making the call, you’ll want to consult this man’s service records. CWSS gives you the microfilm number you need to order copies (for a fee) of a service file from the National Archives and Records Administration’s (NARA) Order Online site.

In the CWSS search results, click on a unit name for details on when and where the unit was raised and the battles it fought, and how many members died from bullets and disease. Another way to confirm the Joseph we found is your great-grandfather: Check the 1860 US census for for other Joseph Harbisons in the counties where the Pennsylvania 11th was raised.

Your great-grandfather may have applied for a military pension. Look for the General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934, on Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org. I found a Joseph Harbison who filed for a pension in Pennsylvania July 29, 1890 (his application number is 495309). Keep in mind this could be a different Joseph; request copies of the originals from NARA to be sure.

For more information on researching Civil War ancestors, see Family Tree Magazine’s step-by-step Civil War Genealogy Guide.

Genealogy Records for Civil War Soldiers

Vicki’s note – article from Legacy Family Tree. 

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Find Genealogy Records for a Civil War Soldier
5/16/2017
You’ve got questions about discovering, preserving and celebrating your family history; our experts have the answers.
Q. All I know is that my great-grandfather Joseph A. Harbison fought for the Union in the Civil War. He enlisted from Pennsylvania. How do I get information about him?

 

A.The National Park Service has given you a great place to start in its Civil War Soldiers and Sailors Database (CWSS). You can search for Union or Confederate soldiers and African-American Union sailors. Our search turned up a Joseph H. Harbison in the 11th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry. Is this your great-grandfather with an incorrect middle initial? Before making the call, you’ll want to consult this man’s service records. CWSS gives you the microfilm number you need to order copies (for a fee) of a service file from the National Archives and Records Administration’s (NARA) Order Online site.

In the CWSS search results, click on a unit name for details on when and where the unit was raised and the battles it fought, and how many members died from bullets and disease. Another way to confirm the Joseph we found is your great-grandfather: Check the 1860 US census for for other Joseph Harbisons in the counties where the Pennsylvania 11th was raised.

Your great-grandfather may have applied for a military pension. Look for the General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934, on Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org. I found a Joseph Harbison who filed for a pension in Pennsylvania July 29, 1890 (his application number is 495309). Keep in mind this could be a different Joseph; request copies of the originals from NARA to be sure.

For more information on researching Civil War ancestors, see Family Tree Magazine’s step-by-step Civil War Genealogy Guide.

How to Trace WW1 Military Ancestors

Vicki’s Note  – an article from Family Tree Magazine Insider – a good follow-up to our NARA Webinar tomorrow, Friday April 14, 10 a.m. at the Stateline Genealogy Club @ Beloit Public Library program.
Wednesday, April 05, 2017

6 Records to Trace Ancestors Who Served in World War I
Posted by Diane HaddadThe United States declared war on Germany 100 years ago this month, on April 6, 1917, joining the side of the Allies in the Great War. See all the countries caught up in the conflict in our timeline of World War I war declarations.

More than 650,000 from Canada and Newfoundland and about 4 million from the United States served in the military. These are two of the US Expeditionary Force soldiers in my family:

On the left is Joe Seeger, who enlisted September 1917; and on the right is his brother Norbert (with their father), who enlisted July 1918.

Loss of WWI Service Records in NPRC Fire
When you go to research your WWI ancestors’ military service, you’ll make a sad discovery: More than 80 percent of US Army service records for those discharged between Nov. 1, 1912 and Jan. 1, 1960 (which includes WWI soldiers) were destroyed in a 1973 fire at the National Archives’ National Personnel Records Center in St. Louis. (You can request surviving WWI service records following these instructions.)

But there are other ways to trace your ancestor’s WWI service, including:

1. Draft Registration Cards
More than 24 million men (including immigrants who hadn’t naturalized) registered for the draft in 1917 and 1918, although not all of them served. These are widely available on genealogy websites like Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.

2. State Adjutant General Rosters
Most states issued a roster of soldiers in World War I. Both Joe and Norbert are listed in The Official Roster of Ohio Soldiers, Sailors and Marines in the World War, 1917-18, on Ancestry.com as Ohio Soldiers in WWI, 1917-1918.

3. WWI Transport Service Records
Fold3 just published this collection of passenger lists of military transport ships. Norbert was listed with Supply Co. 336, leaving New York City Oct 27, 1918, and arriving in Liverpool Nov. 8. I had to scroll through the records to find a page with a date and ports.

He was on another ship Nov. 11, but I can’t find a page noting where it took him. His last transport took him home: The USS Orizaba departed Brest, France, July 29, 1919, and arrived at Newport News, Va., Aug. 6.

4. Discharge Papers
Most discharged service members registered with their local courthouses on return to their communities. I can’t find my WWI servicemen among the veteran discharges in FamilySearch’s records for Hamilton County, Ohio, so here’s the record for another man:



5. Veterans Surveys
Many communities asked local veterans to complete surveys about their service in the World War. My cousin three times removed Louis E. Thoss filled out this one for the Kentucky Council of Defense (it’s now part of the Kenton County Public Library’s genealogy database).

The US Army Military History Institute also has a collection of WWI veterans questionnaires completed in the late 1970s, along with photos, letters, memoirs and other materials.

6. Military Headstone Application
When Joe died in 1941, his sister applied for a military headstone based on his WWI service. These are on National Archives microfilm, and digitized on Ancestry.com.

You’ll find more ways to research your World War I ancestors in these articles:

Ancestry.com | FamilySearch | Fold3 | Military records | World War One Genealogy

Wednesday, April 05, 2017 2:54:20 PM (Eastern Daylight Time, UTC-04:00)  #  Comments [2]

Free download of Google Earth Pro

Vicki’s note – April 6, 2017 article from Family Tree Legacy Genealogy insider e-newsletter, Diane Haddad:

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Free download of Google Earth Pro

Download Google Earth Pro for Free

Geography and genealogy go hand in hand: researching places tells you about the ancestors who lived there. This makes Google Earth software incredible handy, and now you can download Google Earth Pro for free. Watch Google Earth guru Lisa Louise Cooke explain what’s so great about this program–and learn about our Google Earth for Genealogists online course starting April 10. Read More…

Social History (of Ancestor’s Daily Life)

Vicki’s note – article from Family Tree magazine – Genealogy Insider – Diane Haddad:

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Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Social History & Noah Wyle’s Civil War Ancestry on “Who Do You Think You Are?”
Posted by Diane

I remember Noah Wyle from his days portraying a wide-eyed medical student on “ER.” Last night on “Who Do You Think You Are?” we saw him tracking down his third-great-grandfather J.H. Mills, who served the Confederacy in the Civil War and fought in the bloody Battle of Shiloh.

Later, in Mississippi, newspaper articles show J.H. was a prominent, well-liked citizen. But he killed himself when he couldn’t make a premium payment for his life insurance policy, which under a then-common “deferred dividend” scheme, meant that he would lose his entire life savings. His suicide before the policy lapsed allowed his family to receive benefits.

Unfortunately, Wyle’s third-great-grandmother, Mary Emily, still became destitute and had to rely on J.H.’s meager military pension. She died in 1928 in a home for soldiers and widows at Beauvoir, the former home of Confederate president Jefferson Davis.

Something that struck me in this episode was how the experts’ social history knowledge enhanced the story. Wyle learned the backstory of the Crescent regiment that J.H. joined in New Orleans—mostly comprised of the city’s educated elite, who would’ve been neophytes in battle.

Another historian shared information on J.H.’s deferred dividend life insurance policy (called a “tontine”—read about it here), a practice that was outlawed after the Armstrong investigation in 1905. In light of her explanation, we gain insight into J.H.’s motivation for taking his own life.

Here’s  list of 10 free social history websites where you can start exploring the places and times your ancestors lived in.

And exploring social history to learn more about your family is the whole idea behind Family Tree Magazine‘s History Matters column, which you’ll find collected in our Best of History Matters e-book. You also might find our How to Research Your Ancestor’s Daily Life Online video class helpful as you search for details on everyday lives of your forbears.

Noah Wyle’s “Who Do You Think You Are?” episode is online but “locked,” so you have to log in with a TV subscription to watch it (I’ve missed a couple of episodes so far for that reason).

Popular Genealogy Shows -“Who Do You Think You Are” & “Long Lost Family” return in March to TLC

Vicki’s Note – “Who Do You Think You Are?” – One of My Favorite Shows is returning – per Family Tree Magazine article by Diane Haddad.  That and another new show, “Long Lost Family” may be available to watch for free on TLC – per Ancestry.com.  I don’t have Cable TV, so maybe the cable-less can still see these shows.  Let me know if any of you have success in viewing these shows through cellular telephone service. :

Popular Genealogy Shows -“Who Do You Think You Are” & “Long Lost Family” return in March to TLC

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“Who Do You Think You Are?” Announces
Premiere Date & Celebrity Lineup
Name

The family history TV show “Who Do You Think You Are?” is returning soon to TLC , with a new host of celebrities ready to dive into their genealogy. Visit the Genealogy Insider blog to see when you can catch the premiere and who’s starring this season (that’s Julie Bowen from “Modern Family” in the picture to the left).  Read More…

Ancestry is proud to support Long Lost Family and Who Do You Think You Are?
Watch Sundays on TLC
Ancestry
2 HOURS OF NEW EPISODES, SUNDAYS 9/8C ON TLC
Watch two powerful shows on one special night.
Join TLC on Sunday evenings for riveting new episodes of Long Lost Family—and an all‑new season of Who Do You Think You Are? where your favorite celebrities embark on journeys of self‑discovery.
Discover the shows
Ancestry makes discoveries possible for these inspiring shows.
Long Lost Family and Who Do You Think You Are?

ABOUT TLC Television Shows

  • What is TLC.com?TLC.com lets you watch live streams and full episodes from TLC in HD on the web, your smartphone or tablet. You can also download our mobile app, TLC Go, on the App Store or on Google Play.
  • What content is included?You can watch current episodes from TLC.
    Additionally, the app and website include a live stream, so you can watch live TV whenever and wherever you want.
  • Do I have to sign-in or subscribe to a package from a TV provider to watch full episodes?For most episodes, yes. But a selection of episodes is available without signing in. We frequently update what episodes we offer without signing in, so check back if your favorite series isn’t included right now.
  • Who is my TV Provider?Your TV provider is the cable, satellite or telecommunications company that you pay a monthly subscription fee to in order to receive Discovery’s television networks.
  • Can I watch videos when I am not connected to the Internet?No, sorry, you must be connected to the Internet to enjoy TLC.com.
  • Can I watch over a cellular connections?You will have the best experience watching via a wireless connection, but TLC.com will work on cellular services.

6 Keys to Success for African-American Genealogy Research AND Free Book

Vicki’s Note – 2-1-2017  Family Tree Magazine article posted on Facebook:

6 Keys to Success for African-American

Genealogy Research
Posted by Diane Haddad


Library of Congress

National African-American History Month began in 1926 when Carter G. Woodson and the Association for the Study of African-American Life and History founded Negro History Week.

The observation was expanded to a month in February 1976 with a declaration by President Gerald Ford. In 2017, you’ll find commemorations

So let’s talk genealogy. Those researching African-American ancestors often face a brick wall at slavery. These keys from Family Tree Magazine contributing editor Sunny Jane Morton are important to give yourself yourself the best possible chance to find your family:


Library of Congress

1. It’s not impossible. Tracing relatives in slavery is difficult due to the scarcity of historical records naming slaves. But with persistence, many African-American genealogists have been able to identify their enslaved ancestors.

2. Trace your family back to the Civil War using typical sources and methods, such as talking to relatives and searching censuses, vital records and newspapers. You may find that some records are segregated, such as a “colored” marriage register.

3. Study your family’s migrations. During the 20th century, millions of African-Americans in the rural South moved to cities in the north and west. If your family followed this pattern, ask relatives about your family’s moves and use censuses and city directories to track them.

4. Check the 1860 and 1850 censuses. About 90 percent of African-Americans were enslaved at the time of the Civil War, and weren’t named in censuses. Free blacks often do appear in censuses and other records.

5. Identify slaveholding families. Enslaved people didn’t have legal surnames. Freed slaves sometimes (but not always) took the surname of a former slaveholder. If this was the case for your family, the name may lead you to their location during slavery. You may need to use records of the slaveholding families, such as wills and estate inventories, to trace your enslaved ancestors’ whereabouts.

6. Go offline. To learn about African-American ancestors before 1865, you’ll probably need to research in records that aren’t online.

Click here to download our free e-book Trace Your African-American Ancestry, with six guides from Family Tree Magazine to help you discover your African-American family history.

And this just in: Genealogy website Fold3 has announced that its African-American genealogy records collection will be free to access for the month of February. You may need to set up a free Fold3 registration to use the records.

How to Use eBay for Genealogy

Vicki’s Note – article from Family Tree Magazine (Diane Hadad):

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How to Use eBay for Genealogy

8/30/2016 By Madge Maril

Using eBay for genealogy research would have never crossed my mind. That is, until I saw Emily Kowalski Schroeder’s post on Instagram about finding an advertisement for the farm store of her husband’s great-uncle on eBay.

“Do you search for #familyhistory memorabilia on EBay? I recently purchased an old matchbook cover advertising a farm implement store run by my husband’s great-uncles.” -@emilys129

How clever is that? Sometimes, we spend so much time chasing our hard-to-find ancestors that we ignore the easy-to-find information right in front of our noses: searching for your family name on websites like eBay.

I decided I had to try it out for myself. Luckily, I have an easy last name and some interesting relatives. I typed in “Maril” into eBay’s search browser.

I’d always known I was related to the 20th century modernist painter, Herman Maril. A few days ago I posted the emotional story of finding a voice recording of his on Facebook. What I didn’t know is that there was a plethora of information on Herman right there on eBay, waiting for me to find.

I found books detailing art exhibitions in New York, photographs The Baltimore Sun were selling from their collection (which means there’s a Baltimore Sun article I need to find!) and actual paintings from my relative.

Luckily, eBay features a contact service. While I’m not able to afford one of Herman’s paintings (one was listed for close to $500), contacting the seller of the painting is totally free. I sent them a message explaining I was a relative of Herman’s and I was wondering who they were and how they came to own the painting.

Not only does eBay give me the chance to learn more about Herman Maril through new documents surfacing online, I also will get to know about how this person came to own one of my relative’s paintings. And who knows—maybe the person selling the painting is a Maril, and I just found a new branch on my family tree!

If you aren’t having luck with last names, try searching for yearbooks from your ancestor’s schools in the years they lived there or newspapers you know they were featured in.

Diane Haddad from the Genealogy Insider suggests finding the perfect gift for a family member by using eBay. “For my dad’s Christmas one year, I found him some postcards of a town he lived in for a couple of years as a child, while his dad was building a dam on the Missouri River,” Diane says.

With every item I find about Herman Maril or any of my ancestors, the story of my family tree is illuminated.