Tag Archives: History of Rock County

Orphan Trains and Rock County Wisconsin At the Beloit Public Library:

Orphan Trains and Rock County Wisconsin; At the Beloit Public Library:

Vicki’s note – See notice below of a bonus Tuesday evening program  at the Beloit Public Library of interest to many.  This is from the Library’s “Around the Library” March/April/May 2018 brochure:

“Emily’s Story – The Brave Journey of an Orphan Train Rider
A presentation by Clark Kidder
Tuesday, March 27, at 7 p.m.
In this presentation, Clark Kidder brings to light his own
research on the orphan trains. Between 1854 and 1929,
nearly 250,000 children were transported from New York City to the homes of farm families in almost every state, particularly in the Midwest. Kidder tells the Dickensian story of his paternal grandmother, the late Emily (Reese) Kidder, of Milton, who, at the tender age of 13, rode an orphan train to the Midwest in 1906. Kidder will read from his book, Emily’s Story – The Brave Journey of an Orphan Train Rider. He will also show pictures from the book in a PowerPoint presentation. The presentation runs about one hour in length, and Mr. Kidder will conduct a Q & A session and book signing following the presentation.”

 

Quote from Amazon.com site about the book:

“It seems incomprehensible that there was a time in America s not-so-distant past that nearly 200,000 children could be loaded on trains in large cities on our East Coast, sent to the rural Midwest, and presented for the picking to anyone who expressed an interest in them. That’s exactly what happened between the years 1854 and 1930. The primitive social experiment became known as placing out, and had its origins in a New York City organization founded by Charles Loring Brace called the Children’s Aid Society. The Society gathered up orphans, half-orphans, and abandoned children from streets and orphanages, and placed them on what are now referred to as Orphan Trains. It was Brace s belief that there was always room for one more at a farmer s table. The stories of the individual children involved in this great migration of little emigrants have nearly all been lost in the attic of American history. In this book, the author tells the true story of his paternal grandmother, the late Emily (Reese) Kidder, who, at the tender age of thirteen, became one of the aforementioned children who rode an Orphan Train. In 1906, Emily was plucked from the Elizabeth Home for Girls, operated by the Children’s Aid Society, and placed on a train, along with eight other children, bound for Hopkinton, Iowa. Emily s journey, as it turned out, was only just beginning. Life had many lessons in store for her – lessons that would involve perseverance, overcoming adversity, finding lasting love, and suffering great loss. Emily’s story is told through the use of primary material, oral history, interviews, and historical photographs. It is a tribute to the human spirit of an extraordinary young girl who became a woman – a woman to whom the heartfelt phrase “there’s no place like home” had a very profound meaning.”

Clark Kidder will have his book available for sale at the Library program, and will sign books.

Clark Kidde’s Orphan Train Website.

http://www.clarkkidder.com/home.html

This is the same author who produced the six volume set of  “History of the Rural Schools of Rock County” – (mostly one room schools) books that we have at the Library:

Location Call No. Status
 Beloit Genealogy & Local History  GEN 378.7758 Kidder 2015 Oct v.1  REFERENCE
 Beloit Adult Non-Fiction  378.7758 Kidder 2015 Oct v.1  ON SHELF
Description 340 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm.
text txt rdacontent
Series History of the rural schools of Rock County, Wisconsin ; 1.
Note Rock County author.
Included in this book are written histories of the school buildings, memories of pupils and teachers, as well as lists of students, teachers, and board members associated with each school. Also included are various photos of students, teachers, interiors and exteriors of the schools. A history of Rock County Normal school is included, which includes a list of teachers who graduated from the school during its operation.–from container.
Wisconsin author.
Subject Rock County Authors.
Rural schools — Wisconsin — Rock County.
Wisconsin authors.
ISBN 9781505823677
1505823676

Here is some additional information on Orphan Trains:

A non-fiction DVD available at the Beloit Public Library:

Publisher
PBS Home Video,
Publication Date
2006 1995

A book available thru WorldCat on Orphan Trains:

The Children’s Aid Society of New York : an index to the federal, state, and local census records of its lodging houses, 1855-1925

Author: Carolee R Inskeep; Children’s Aid Society (New York, N.Y.)

Publisher: Baltimore, Md. : Clearfield Co., 1996.

Edition/Format:  Print book : English

Database: WorldCat

Subjects –  Children’s Aid Society (New York, N.Y.) — Registers.  Children’s Aid Society (New York, N.Y.)  New York (N.Y.) — Genealogy.

ISBN: 080634623X  9780806346236

OCLC Number: 34963937

Description: ix, 150 pages ; 22 cm

Other Titles: Children’s Aid Society of New York (1855-1925)

Related Subjects:(19)

(The Related Subjects listed will give you suggestions on other terms to use while searching for information on the topic.):

Children’s Aid Society (New York, N.Y.) — Registers.

Children’s Aid Society (New York, N.Y.)

New York (N.Y.) — Genealogy.

Children — New York (State) — New York — Registers.

Vagrant children — New York (State) — New York — Registers.

Registers of births, etc. — New York (State) — New York.

New York (N.Y.) — Census — Indexes.

New York (State) — Census — Indexes.

United States — Census — Indexes.

Census.

Children.

Registers of births, etc.

Vagrant children.

New York (State)

New York (State) — New York.

United States.

United States, New York, New York (City) — Orphans and orphanages.

United States, New York, New York (City) — Societies.

United States, New York, New York (City) — Census — Indexes.

 

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Getting to Know William Graydon’s Family, and Me – Here’s the Punchline!

By Vicki Ruthe Hahn

8-11-2017″

Duhhhh! I forgot to tell you the punchline this morning.

Great questions on my Stateline Genealogy Club @ Beloit Public Library program today.

“Getting to Know William Graydon’s Family, and Me – a Study Showing Genealogy Research Methods and Regional Connections”.

The biggest Stateline/regional connections are these:

Major Jesse Meacham’s extended family (I think) is connected to the 1833 founding of the community West of Chicago – Meacham Grove, Illinois

(I believe that this is the “Chicago” that Major Jesse Meacham, and later, Elizabeth Lulu Booth visited before going to Troy WI.)

While Jesse Meacham went on to found Troy, Wisconsin (where William R Graydon’s family later moved),

Caleb Blodgett bought a farm/acreage in Meacham Grove, Illinois.

After a short while, Caleb Blodgett sold his Illinois land, and moved to Wisconsin.

The French trapper Joseph Thiebault (Tebo) was the first white man who came to the Beloit Wisconsin area in 1820.  He was married to two American Indian wives at the same time.

Stephen Mack was the first white settler (mid 1830s) in the Rockton Illinois area, and was married to Hononegah, a Native American woman from one of the surrounding tribes.  He founded Macktown, Illinois.

Tebo and Stephen Mack knew, and traded with each other.

Caleb Blodgett bought “three looks” of land in 1836 from Tebo, and founded what became Beloit, Wisconsin.

Caleb Blodgett knew, and traded with, Stephen Mack of Macktown Illinois (near Rockton).

 

And now you know (some of ) the rest of the story!