Tag Archives: How to Archive Family Photos

Free Family Genealogy Charts

Here is a great website from Cyndi’s list that may have the family chart(s) (and other genealogy forms)  that you need:

http://www.cyndislist.com/free-stuff/printable-charts-and-forms/?page=3

I have not found the chart that I am looking for yet. I have been looking for a particular type of family genealogy chart which does not seem to exist, so I will be creating one.  My family is making a unique family history book that will be mostly photographs of ancestors and descendants.  My sisters and I are right in the middle of the generations that will be depicted, and we will have a chart in the middle of the large (12″ x 18″ ??) book that opens onto both pages showing ancestors and descendants of our parents.  My Mom’s ancestors will be on one side of the book, at the top of a page, and my Dad’s ancestors on the other side of the book on the top of that page.

My best way to describe the family chart that I am looking for is an angel-shaped chart (without the head.)  It will have 6 or 7 generations of ancestors as a wing from our Mom’s family, and another from our Dad’s family.  I don’t like the fan charts, as I don’t like standing on my head to read the names and dates, so their ancestors will be shown as 2 landscape hourglass wings.

The descendants will be split on both sides of the bottom of the pages, with (my) three siblings on one page and four on the other side.  Then the grandchildren, and great grandchildren will continue as the “skirt” of the angel. (Although – looking at  it, I may have to make it a two/five split to balance, because my own individual family has the most grandchildren/ great grandchildren.)  I’m not sure if it will include the descendant’s spouses yet; but I will include the dob, dom, dod, and places of birth for the ancestors, so that I can show the countries of origin.

It will look something like this, with the spine groove of the book in the middle, open to the center of the book. (I did this on Excel.)

Angel Family Chart

There will be more generations back, even if some of the names are blank. I want to get back far enough to show the diversity of the countries that our ancestors came from- Germany, Ireland, Scotland, French, Welsh, English, and (??)

So there will be bigger “wings’ and less “skirt”, unless we take too long and need more room for descendants.  The book will be (self) published years before that, but maybe I will leave room for more descendant names to be written in later as some of the grandchildren have not yet had children that are in our (unplanned near) future.

Happy Easter to all of you, and enjoy celebrating your families on this holiday, and everyday.

 

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A Simple Four-Part System for Naming Digital Photo Files

# Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Posted by Diane

Guest blogger, Denise Levenick who helps you manage your digital photo collection in the new book How To Archive Family Photos, is sharing these file-naming tips this week:

The key to organizing your photo collection is a simple and logical naming system. Start with simple file names that don’t require a key to abbreviations. And make it a habit to import and rename images soon after a photo shoot or scanning session.

Long, complicated file naming schemes are difficult to maintain and cumbersome to use. The end of the name may be cut off in your computer folder view or printout. More words give more opportunity for misspellings or inconsistency.

As you develop your file-naming scheme, create a File-naming Cheat Sheet and post it next to your computer to help you maintain consistency. Here’s a cheat sheet for my four-part file-naming scheme:

The four parts of my digital photo file names are

  1. Name: Surname-firstname
  2. Date: YYYYMMDD
  3. Location: from largest to smallest with two letter abbreviation used for states
  4. Event: obit, birth-cert, etc.

I separate the parts with an underscore, and use a dash to separate words in each part. The names are short and consistent, with all lowercase characters. Here’s an example:

smith-john_19240315_co-pueblo_theater-edit.jpg

Whatever file-naming scheme you adopt, your files will be easier to organize and access if it’s simple and consistent for all your digital images. Learn more about working with scanned and newly captured digital images in How to Archive Family Photos and at my blog, The Family Curator.