Category Archives: Vicki RUTHE HAHN – Stateline Genealogist

What Car Bumper Sticker Would You Want?

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What Car Bumper Sticker Would You Want?

Vicki Ruthe Hahn

5-17-2018

If you were creating a bumper sticker to tell the world about your genealogy hobby, what would you declare? Genealogy is the number one hobby, (except May – August, when gardening is temporarily the number one hobby!) 

These are sayings thought up by a Library staff committee when we were promoting our new (2013) Ancestry.com Library Edition database at Beloit Public Library.

We still have Ancestry.com Library Edition database at Beloit Public Library!

Find Family

Find Your History

Dig deeper

Past Look

Past Links?

Who’s Behind You?

Connect the dots….

Discover Family

Your History

Family Connections

Beneath the Surface

Indoor Sport

Meet the Family

Meet Your Family

Wild Ones?

Skeletons?

Your Family Book

Family First

Family Tree?

Doing it In the Library

 

 

 

 

 

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Irish DNA Registry’s Facebook Group

Irish DNA Registry’s Facebook Group

by Vicki Ruthe Hahn

SGS Stateline Genealogy Sorter

April 7, 2018

four-leaf-clover-hi

Stateline Genealogy Club @ Beloit Public Library member Karen Bernard inquired about this resource that is new to me.

Irish DNA Registry’s Facebook group
https://www.facebook.com/groups/TheIrishDNARegistry/

It is a closed Facebook support group that you have to ask to join.

The group is focused on DNA test results connected to Irish results only.

The whole purpose seems to be finding Irish cousins,

and helping genealogy searchers link to finding out more about their Irish (location) origins.

One must first have taken, and gotten results, from a DNA test.

Then upload the test results onto the free universal sharing site –

 

GEDmatch.com  (https://www.gedmatch.com/login1.php)
before joining this Facebook group.
GEDmatch offers a matching tool that may help with interpreting your DNA test results
whether you are Irish or not.

Tools for DNA and Genealogy Research
GEDmatch provides DNA and genealogical analysis tools for amateur and professional researchers and genealogists. Most tools are free, but They do provide some premium tools for users who wish to help support with contributions. One will need to upload DNA and / or genealogical (GEDCOM) data to make use of the tools there. Registration requires your name, email and a password of your choice. Click HERE to register.

You can  also upload your DNA test results to FTDNA (Family Tree), or MyHeritage for free, as this will add greatly to your contacts and hopefully your results.
You do not have to have a membership to MyHeritage.

The Irish DNA Registry’s Facebook group has enough members to get results:

Members · 5,152

Getting your DNA tested can help break through brick walls.
There is nothing to lose and so much potential for gain.

There are frequent sales at each of the DNA testing companies for about $60 for a general autosomal test.

Males can spend more, and be tested at FTDNA for their Y DNA.

Once your tests are done, and submitted to the various comparison sites (particularly
GedMatch), it is there for posterity.

Your sample at FTDNA is kept for any future developments, so there is no need to re-test.

Ideally you should have your oldest living relative/s sampled, as well as having siblings, cousins and other more distant known relatives tested.  This for comparison and elimination to narrow down most recent common ancestors (MRCAs). (This is a new term to me.
Include as complete a family ancestry tree as you can plus all
known ancestral surnames. To compare a DNA match one needs clues!

Irish peoples have emigrated all over the world.
Searching Irish ancestry seems to be especially difficult, due to the destruction of key records in Ireland.
Here are some especially helpful links to resources to help you search your Irish Ancestry:

(4-7-2018 I am sad to say that Sean E. Quinn’s “all things Irish” website IrishAncestors.net

is not longer available. It was a great resource.  I do not know what happened, and will let you know if I find out.)

See MANY, many more links at The StatelineGenealogyClub.wordpress.com BLOG under the top tab
Genealogy Links and Electronic Helps and then search alphabetically DOWN  to

“Irish Ancestors, (see also Scots- Irish Ancestors)”

DNA is increasingly proving the links where paper trails fail.

Karen, thanks for letting us know about this Irish DNA Registry’s Facebook group.
I too am finding my Irish Ancestors difficult.
And thanks for reminding me about uploading my DNA results to GEDmatch.com, and FTDNA and MyHeritage.com.
One more thing that I want to do soon.

Other Travelers Part 10 – Tracing the 1918 Flu Epidemic

(Part of an On-going Series – “Other Travelers”)

by Vicki Ruthe Hahn – SGS Stateline Genealogy Sorter

Have you gotten the flu this season?

Not the 24 hour stomach flu (which is bad enough), but the upper respiratory Influenza A or B?  Flu has hit this year especially hard, killing several children. But it is nothing close to the amount of deaths in the Pandemic of 1918.

Perhaps your ancestors were affected by that epidemic – one hundred years ago this year?  Whole families were wiped out.

 

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Let’s get some insight:

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From Standford Children’s Health:

“What are the different types of influenza?

Influenza viruses are divided into three types designated as A, B, and C:

  • Influenza types A and B are responsible for epidemics of respiratory illness that occur almost every winter and often lead to increased rates of hospitalization and death. Public health efforts to control the impact of influenza focus on types A and B. One of the reasons the flu remains a problem is because the viruses actually change their structure regularly. This means that people are exposed to new types of the virus each year.
  • Influenza type C usually causes either a very mild respiratory illness or no symptoms at all. It does not cause epidemics and does not have the severe public health impact that influenza types A and B do….
  1. A person infected with an influenza virus develops antibodies against that virus.
  2. The virus changes.
  3. The “older” antibodies no longer recognizes the “newer” virus when the next flu season comes around.
  4. The person becomes infected again.

The older antibodies can, however, give some protection against getting the flu again. Currently, three different influenza viruses circulate worldwide: two type A viruses and one type B virus. Vaccines given each year to protect against the flu contain the influenza virus strain from each type that is expected to cause the flu that year.

What causes influenza?

An influenza virus is generally passed from person to person through the air. .. with infected person who sneezes or coughs. The virus can also live for a short time on objects …can get the flu virus by touching something that has been handled by someone infected with the virus and then touching his or her own mouth, nose, or eyes.

People are generally the most contagious with the flu 24 hours before they start having symptoms  (emphasis mine) and during the time they have the most symptoms. That’s why it is hard to prevent the spread of the flu, especially among children, because they do not always know they are sick while they are still spreading the disease. The risk of infecting others usually stops around the seventh day of the infection.”

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See the source image

Most entertainments, churches, social clubs, libraries, movie houses, etc. were eventually shut down.  But they tried wearing masks for awhile!

Officials Wearing Gauze Masks

Milkmen(?) braving the Flu to deliver milk to stores, and to people’s homes

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The Flu Epidemic rapidly made many children orphans, dependent on the care of others.

Many families died of neglect or starvation, remaining isolated in their homes, afraid to come out for supplies or medical attention.  Some neighbors were afraid to enter the homes of those who were sick.  So many medical doctors were in the War, ill, or overwhelmed.  anyone with medical training was asked to help, and some communities recruited  volunteers to care for the sick.

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From Standford University, by Molly Billings, June, 1997 modified RDS February, 2005:

“The influenza pandemic of 1918-1919 killed more people than the Great War, known today as World War I (WWI) … It has been cited as the most devastating epidemic in recorded world history. More people died of influenza in a single year than in four-years of the Black Death Bubonic Plague from 1347 to 1351. Known as “Spanish Flu” or “La Grippe” the influenza of 1918-1919 was a global disaster…

In the two years that this scourge ravaged the earth, a fifth of the world’s population was infected. The flu was most deadly for people ages 20 to 40. This pattern of morbidity was unusual for influenza which is usually a killer of the elderly and young children. It infected 28% of all Americans (Tice).

An estimated 675,000 Americans died of influenza during the pandemic, ten times as many as in the world war. Of the U.S. soldiers who died in Europe, half of them fell to the influenza virus and not to the enemy (Deseret News). An estimated 43,000 servicemen mobilized for WWI died of influenza (Crosby). 1918 would go down as unforgettable year of suffering and death and yet of peace…

The effect of the influenza epidemic was so severe that the average life span in the US was depressed by 10 years.   (Emphasis mine.)…

In 1918 children would skip rope to the rhyme (Crawford):

 

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History is reflected in children’s games, and in songs.

(“Ring-around-the Rosie” is NOT from the time of the Black Plaque!)

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The mandatory gauze masks were not always very effective.  There is the story of 4 women who wore masks while playing cards one evening.  By the next morning three of them were dead from Influenza.

 

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In an effort to boost the War effort, President Woodrow Wilson (and others) initially tried to ignore the pandemic, and suppress news about it.  How depressing that so many of those who survived the war, ended up dying of influenza.  Whole shiploads of military men were affected, some never making it to serve in the War.

The cause of most of the deaths in this pandemic was the secondary pneumonia.  There were no antibiotics.  Influenza frequently has secondary infections – strep throat, ear infections, Pink Eye, etc.  But this time it was more than that. (see explanation below.)

Be alert if you see several people in your ancestor’s family die suddenly, and within a few days of each other, especially if between September 1918 and about June 1919.  A death certificate may not mention flu/influenza, but pneumonia, etc. as cause of death.  Or there might not have been a police officer/medical person/undertaker/county recorder available to make any registration. (see explanation below.)  Some members of the family may have been buried in a mass grave with no records.

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From History.com

The first wave of the 1918 pandemic occurred in the spring and was generally mild. The sick …experienced … typical flu symptoms….

However, a second, highly contagious wave of influenza appeared with a vengeance in the fall of that same year. Victims died within hours or days of developing symptoms, their skin turning blue and their lungs filling with fluid that caused them to suffocate….

Despite the fact that the 1918 flu wasn’t isolated to one place, it became known around the world as the Spanish flu, as Spain was hit hard by the disease and was not subject to the wartime news blackouts that affected other European countries. (Even Spain’s king, Alfonso XIII, reportedly contracted the flu.)

One unusual aspect of the 1918 flu was that it struck down many previously healthy, young people—a group normally resistant to this type of infectious illness—including a number of World War I servicemen…. Forty percent of the U.S. Navy was hit with the flu, while 36 percent of the Army became ill, and troops moving around the world in crowded ships and trains helped to spread the killer virus.

Although the death toll attributed to the Spanish flu is often estimated at 20 million to 50 million victims worldwide, other estimates run as high as 100 million victims. The exact numbers are impossible to know due to a lack of medical record-keeping in many places.

…Even President Woodrow Wilson reportedly contracted the flu in early 1919 while negotiating the Treaty of Versailles, which ended World War I.

When the 1918 flu hit, doctors and scientists were unsure what caused it or how to treat it. Unlike today, there were no effective vaccines or antivirals, drugs that treat the flu. (The first licensed flu vaccine appeared in America in the 1940s….)

Complicating matters was the fact that World War I had left parts of America with a shortage of physicians and other health workers. And of the available medical personnel in the U.S., many came down with the flu themselves.

Additionally, hospitals in some areas were so overloaded with flu patients that schools, private homes and other buildings had to be converted into makeshift hospitals, some of which were staffed by medical students.

Officials in some communities imposed quarantines, ordered citizens to wear masks and shut down public places, including schools, churches and theaters. People were advised to avoid shaking hands and to stay indoors, libraries put a halt on lending books and regulations were passed banning spitting… the Sanitary Code.”

The flu took a heavy human toll, wiping out entire families and leaving countless widows and orphans in its wake. Funeral parlors were overwhelmed and bodies piled up. Many people had to dig graves for their own family members.

The flu was also detrimental to the economy. In the United States, businesses were forced to shut down because so many employees were sick. Basic services such as mail delivery and garbage collection were hindered due to flu-stricken workers.

In some places there weren’t enough farm workers to harvest crops. Even state and local health departments closed for business, hampering efforts to chronicle the spread of the 1918 flu and provide the public with answers about it.

By the summer of 1919, the flu pandemic came to an end, as those that were infected either died or developed immunity.

Almost 90 years later, in 2008, researchers announced they’d discovered what made the 1918 flu so deadly: A group of three genes enabled the virus to weaken a victim’s bronchial tubes and lungs and clear the way for bacterial pneumonia.

Since 1918, there have been several other influenza pandemics, although none as deadly.”

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The 1918 Spanish Flu Pandemic was world wide:

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The ultimate “other Travelers” in this story are the viruses and bacteria that exploded throughout the world for those 15 months 1918 – 1919.

PBS has a very good “American Experience” documentary of the topic

Aired January 2, 2018

Influenza 1918

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/films/influenza/

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The American military in World War I and the influenza pandemic were closely connected. Influenza spread in The crowded conditions of military camps in the United States and in the trenches of the Western Front in Europe. The virus traveled with military personnel from camp to camp and across the Atlantic military transit ships.  September – November 1918, influenza and pneumonia sickened many in the military at the height of the American military involvement in the war.  This affected the war.

US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

Public Health Rep. 2010; 125(Suppl 3): 82–91.

INFLUENZA IN THE CAMPS

(read the entire article by clicking the links above.)

“…the virus traveled west and south, arriving at Camp Grant, Illinois, on Saturday, September 21, 1918, with 70 hospital admissions. “So sudden and appalling was the visitation that it required the greatest energy and cooperation of every officer, every man, and every nurse to meet the emergency,” wrote one observer.4 (p. 749) Hospital admissions rose to 194, then 370, then 492, to a high of 788 admissions on September 29. Hospital officials summoned all officers on leave, converted barracks to hospital wards, and by “extreme effort” expanded the hospital capacity from “10 occupied beds to a capacity of 4,102 beds in six days.”4 (p.751)

Influenza still overwhelmed every department. The hospital laboratory resorted to local civilian facilities to perform specimen tests. Camp ophthalmologists saw patients with conjunctivitis, an influenza complication, and ear, nose, and throat specialists saw those with other dangerous secondary infections. As individuals became seriously ill, camp officials sent out “danger” or “death” telegrams to families and loved ones, but soon they received so many return calls, telegrams, and visitors, they had to set up a separate hospital tent as an information bureau. Medical personnel were not immune. Eleven of the 81 medical officers fell ill, and three civilian and three Army nurses died. The epidemic even caused the Medical Department to drop its prohibition on black nurses so that Camp Grant called African American nurses to care for patients. The women had to wait, however, until separate, segregated accommodations could be constructed.”

 

National Archives: World War I Centennial

As the largest repository of American World War I records, the National Archives invites you to browse the wealth of records and information documenting the U.S. experience in this conflict, including photographs, documents, audiovisual recordings, educational resources, articles, blog posts, lectures, and events.

Veteran’s Service Records:

https://www.archives.gov/veterans

 

 

 

More Historic Beloit Newspaper Microfilms at the Beloit Public Library

More Historic Beloit Newspaper Microfilms at the Beloit Public Library

February 22, 2018

by Vicki Ruthe Hahn

Image result for historic newspaper microfilm

Many more  of the Historic Beloit Newspaper Microfilms are cataloged and available now for patrons to use on the microfilm machines at the Beloit Public Library.
These were paid for by FNDN Beloit Public Library Foundation.
The patrons are going to love having these additional microfilms.
I put the reels into the bottom right hand side of the microfilm case.
Once the  rest of the microfilms get cataloged,
I will re-arrange the whole case with the earliest newspapers first, (by title).
See the source image
These have been added to the microfilms we have had:
Beloit Free Press (1848 – 1903) with a new one 1900 – 1903.
Beloit Daily Grit (1892 – 1897)
Beloit Daily News BDN (1897 –  March 2015)
(Then look on BPL homepage on-line)
See the source image
These are the titles we have added so far:
Weekly Argus (1885 – 1888)
Beloit Weekly Outlook ( 1880 – 1884)
Beloit Deutsche Zeitung 1895 – 1896
Weekly Citizen & Weekly News (1888 – 1906)
Beloit Labor Journal (1902 – 1903)
Soul City Courier (Oct 1976 – Jan 1977)

More information about the on-line Library newspaper holding is under the  BLOG tab “Genealogy Links and Electronic Helps”.

March 1, 2018 Update

More microfilms cataloged and added:

Beloit Outlook  (Jan 3, 1879; Jan 8, 1880 – May 8, 1880)

Beloit Outlook (Jan 3, 1880 – Jun 26, 1880)

Beloit Daily News! (Aug 14, 1945)

Crusader – Rockford IL  (Sep 1952, Nov 21, 1952; Jul 3, 1963 – Mar 29, 1957)

Crusader – Rockford IL  (Sep 6, 1968 – Jun 2, 1971)

 

 

The Value of Stateline Genealogy Club @ Beloit Public Library & Interlibrary Loan & Library Staff

The Value of Stateline Genealogy Club

@ Beloit Public Library & Interlibrary Loan

February 16, 2017

Vicki’s note – a recognition from Cheryl’s, and my supervisor, Michael DeVries and from author Jim Lateer.  We will have the book in the Beloit Public Library.  Thank you Jim.  It is nice for librarians to be appreciated by an author for our work, which we love doing anyway.  The same type of help is available at public libraries for anyone looking to gain genealogical resources.

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Beloit author Jim Lateer recognized and praised Cheryl Blake, Vicki Hahn, and the staff, in the introduction of his newly published 2018 book on the history of the John F. Kennedy Assassination – “The Three Barons”. Jim is a regular member of Vicki’s Stateline Genealogy Club @ Beloit Public Library and a major Interlibrary Loan Services user.
From the acknowledgments:

“The Three Baron’s Introduction:

“Next, I would like to thank the staff of the Beloit (Wisconsin) Public Library. Cheryl Blake is an expert in inter-library loans and a veteran of 30 plus years in that specialty. Vicki Hahn, also of the Beloit Public Library has arranged training for me and others on the best use of the incredible resources of the Wisconsin Historical Society and its unparalleled collection of history books, one of the best such collections anywhere.”

Michael DeVries

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And from Barnes and Nobel:

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-three-barons-james-w-lateer/1126060550

And from  Google Books:

https://books.google.com/books/about/The_Three_Barons.html?id=UR_LAQAACAAJ

The Three Barons: The Organizational Chart of the JFK Assassination

Front Cover
Trine Day, Dec 29, 2017History384 pages

The Three Barons proves that it is possible (with enough research), to reconstruct the organizational chart of the JFK plot. This book provides the first useful, in-depth analysis of the 120 phone calls by LBJ in the week following the assassination regarding such items as the Civil Rights Act, demands made by the military and similar political power plays. The Three Barons presents the first use of statistical factor analysis to identify the plotters, using a database of 30 books and 1500 names and examines the military officers allegedly close to the plot, such as NATO Commander Gen. Lyman Lemnitzer, General Lauris Norstad, and JFK’s advisor, Gen. Maxwell Taylor. For the first time, the National Security Council, its structure and its members, are scrutinized for their obvious role in the JFK plot. More specifically, The Three Barons explains the role of Treasury Secretary C. Douglas Dillon and his father, investment banker Clarence Dillon, who likely had fascist sympathies. This book identifies, for the first time, why there were three actual barons involved in the plot and why at least three members of the Warren Commission had powerful Nazi connections, beginning in WWII and continuing through November 22, 1963.

2nd Lt. Redene Wayne Simenson U.S.A.A.F. of Beloit, Wisconsin

12-15-2017

Re: 2nd Lt Redene Wayne Simenson U.S.A.A.F.

Hi Derek,

Your stories/facts just keep getting more and more interesting.

My knee is on the mend.

My Scots and Irish are unclear yet – Campbell, Arnold, Adams, and Muir (Moore).

I don’t know where my Scottish ancestors are from yet – too many other nationalities involved – United States  mix.

I am almost to the point in my genealogy research to be able to explore that.

Meanwhile, I am enjoying your history information below.

The Beloit WI Remember When Facebook group is also interested in hearing more about this hometown hero, so I am sharing this with them.

Hopefully we can get you some more information about the family, etc.

Beloit WI is about 37,000 and in some ways a small town with many knowing each other.

I possibly met Redene’s sister at the Library since her obituary says that she liked to read so much, but I don’t recognize her name.

His other siblings would be called teachers, or if they taught at the Beloit College, would be called professors lecturing to college students.

I looked up Sandy, Greg and Donna Thorpe on the public library’s AtoZ phone address directory in Wisconsin and Illinois.

I only saw some Thorpes (about 50 miles north).  If you think they are the right ones- here is the contact information –

I also found 19 pages of Simesons in  several states.

Beloit is right on the Illinois state line, and Redene was born in Durand Illinois.

I found the following information on a public family tree – “Olsen-Simenson-Woods Tree” on Ancestry.com, and contacted the creator for more information or to connect you if he answers.  You can look at his family tree directly (many public libraries here have this database for free at tbe library building.)

https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/person/tree/19814785/person/1012751322/facts

Redene’s sister was Eleanor Thorpe –  a funeral collection said that she resided in Rockford Illinois at tbe time of her 2012 death and that her children are – Sandra Thorpe, Nancy (Mark) Bromhead and Julie (Jim) Barker. So Sandy is probably Sandra in this case.  (AtoZ is being balky right now – but can look later for contact.)

Redene was an identical twin to Eugene Raymond  Simenson ( who died in 1971.)  His children are:

Lawrence born 1938, Ronald born 1940, Randy born 1951 Michigan – now in Charlotte North Carolina ? , and Kim Gail Simenson born 1959 in Michigan now in Charlotte North Carolina?

Redene was married from 1937 – 1939 to a Doris.They lived on Vine ST in Beloit and he worked for the Freeman Shoe Corp. (1937 Beloit WI City Directory)

About 1943 Redene married Eileen (?) Simenson in England.  She was born abt 1921 in England, and their daughter Karen Simenson was born abt 1945 in England.

In application for military headstone – his date of birth is June 10 1917,

his date of death is listed as Dec. 21, 1944 (one day after his ferry asignment.)

He enlisted Nov. 28, 1940 (almost a year before the United States entered World War 2), and was in the 310 Ferrying Squadron.

A U.S. Army Enlistment Record shows his enlistment as Dec. 9, 1942, single withut dependents,and his height as 70 inches (5 foot 10 inches) and weight as 152 pounds.

A (Beloit Daily) Newspaper clipping dated Feb. 19, 1945 (?) shows the following information:    ( Derek – We will get you  a better copy and full citation than the source put on Ancestry.com)

Redene had been overseas 40 months without a visit back to the U.S. before dying in the  plane crash.

He joined Nov. 28, 1940 in the Royal Canadian Air Force after first being rejected by the U.S. Army Air Forces because he did not have college credits, Ten months later, he was assigned to overseas service, and was an instructor in England.  He asked to be transferred  to a fighting command where he piloted a torpedo bomber.

He tranferred to the Royal Air Force, and piloted a Spitfire for one year.

He asked to be transferred to the U.S. Army air Forces once the United States entered World War 2, and joined the Ferry Command taking airplanes for several months to Africa, Italy, Iceland, and then to France after the invasion of the continent.

His services to the Ferry Command were regarded highly because he was able to fly any type of plane. According to his letters home, there was not any type of plane made in the United States or England that he had not flown at one time or another.

Redene wrote to his brother Eugene that he had become a member of a test pilot squadron –

“If something happens to me, don’t be surprised. I am volunteering to go on missions that other fellows refuse to go on.”

He had two narrow escapes – in one he landed his Spitfire in flames and was hospitalized for a time, but did not say much about how serious his injuries were.

Redene meet (Beloiters) overseas:

Shortly before the Dieppe raid in August 1942, he and Captain Mason C Dobson, now a prisoner of war of the Germans, spent several days together in London.

He also met Major Jesse Davis by chance in a United States Army air base.

 

Vicki Hahn
Public Services Librarian
Beloit Public Library
Dear Derek Wands,
It’s nice to hear from your from “across the pond”.
I may get there myself some year as some of my ancestors are Scottish.
Yes I would be glad to help you find more information for the book on aviation history and about
2nd Lt. Redene Wayne Simenson U.S.A.A.F. of Beloit, Wisconsin if I can.
I am off work for three more weeks because of knee surgery.
I can look st our Beloit City Directories, etc. once I return.
Meanwhile I will put this in a posting for my
“Statelinegenealogyclub,wordpress.com”
BLOG (which is probably where you heard about me?)
I will also post it on the closed Facebook group I belong to – Beloit Wisconsin Remember When.
Maybe someone else will know more about the family or person.
What date do you all need the information by?
Vicki Hahn
Public Services Librarian
Beloit Public Library 605 Eclipse BLVD. Beloit, WI 53511

Mayflower Society & DAR/SAR – Patriot to Passenger Project

November 28, 2017

Vicki’s note – helpful site found by Katherine Kemnitz, Genealogist.  I’m looking forward to exploring this site, as I have just found an ancestral connection to President John Adams and to some Mayflower passenger.

December 16, 2017 Update:

I am related to 2nd U.S. President John Adams (my first cousin seven times removed) ? John Adams father (also) John Adams (my 7th Great Uncle) was brother to Samuel Adams, also a Revolutionary War hero in his own right, Samuel is my 6th Great-grandfather on the Ruthe side of our family (Lucy Adams Leighty). The second John Adams son, 6th U.S. President, John Quincy Adams is my 2nd cousin 6 times removed.

I was able to find important information on the Mayflower Society & DAR/SAR – Patriot to Passenger Project to confirm this.  (Thanks Katherine Kemnitz.)

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Mayflower Society & DAR/SAR –

Patriot to Passenger Project

 

There is a partnership between the Mayflower Society and DAR/SAR – they have created a database connecting proven DAR/SAR Patriots to passengers on the Mayflower. It was a great find – thought it might be helpful to folks.
Katherine Kemnitz

The Patriot to Passenger Project

The Patriot to Passenger Project is a growing published list of Patriots who descend from Mayflower passengers in an effort to build a bridge between other heritage societies.

200px Minute Man Statue Lexington Massachusetts cropped

As more and more information becomes available on the internet, descendants are reaching out to connect their Revolutionary War Patriot with the Mayflower Society.  Many Daughters and Sons of the American Revolution Societies (DAR and SAR) are asking if they also have an ancestral tie to a Mayflower passenger and are interested in finding how they may become a member.

The Patriot to Passenger Project is a growing published list of Patriots who descend from Mayflower passengers, in an effort to build a bridge between other heritage societies. So many of our Mayflower members are also members of other lineage societies such as DAR, SAR, Colonial Dames, etc.  We often see many of our friends at these other meetings.

The Patriot to Passenger Project is a way to help others find their link to a Mayflower Pilgrim and also benefits our Mayflower members to discover other Mayflower lines of descent so that they can submit supplemental applications to honor and recognize all of their ancestors.

This project is a work in progress. If you have any ideas, thoughts or suggestions, please contact Muriel Cushing at Flash1620@comcast.net.

Click here for the Patriot to Passenger database. >>

2018 Stateline Genealogy Club @ Beloit Public Library Programs

by Vicki Hann 11-22-2017

2018 Stateline Genealogy Club @ Beloit Public Library Programs are now set.  They are below, and always available on the tab at the top of the BLOG.

(Sorry, I have been off for a few weeks after knee surgery.  More posts will follow as I recover more.  I will be back to work after the December 8, 2017 program.  That webinar/program will still happen.  Enjoy your Thanksgiving and  Christmas holidays.)

2018 Programs for Stateline Genealogy Club @ Beloit Public Library                                  

 2nd Fridays of the month from 10 a.m. – noon.

Beloit Public Library, 605 Eclipse BLVD, Beloit WI

January 12, 2018 “Family History for Beginners, and Detective Techniques for Experienced Genealogists”, by Vicki Ruthe Hahn  – Effectively find the most that you can about your family history with hands-on exercises, & examples.  Be successful using basic genealogy research methods. Learn how to: search archives & on-line, record evidence, organize your genealogy, use timelines & “FAN” clubs, analyze records, & find missing clues based on what you know, etc.

February 9, 2018 “How to Use FamilySearch.org”, by Nancy Ritter, Beloit Family History Center

March 9, 2018 “The PaperLess Genealogist, Organize Your Genealogy with Digital Files”, webinar by Denise May Levenick – Archiving Photographs and paperwork.

Tuesday March 27, 2018 Bonus Program “Emily’s Story – The Brave Journey of an Orphan Train Rider” A Presentation by Clark Kidder. 7 – 9 p.m. BPL Meeting Room.

April 13, 2018 – Polish Ancestors – Place Names and Websites; Two FamilySearch.org webinars.

May 11, 2018 “My Genealogy Do-Over – A Year of Learning from Research Mistakes”, webinar by Thomas MacEntee –  Follow experienced genealogist Thomas MacEntee as he re-starts his genealogy research from scratch and includes sound research practices and methodologies which he has learned over the years, as well as new templates and the latest technology, to create a better body of family history.

May 25, 2018 Oakwood Cemetery, Beloit 9 a.m. – Bonus 4th Friday Tour – Robert Pokorney III

June 8, 2018 “What is the difference between Amish, Quakers, Mennonites, and Hutterites – for my Family Genealogy Search?”  Several webinars explaining the differences.

June 22, 2018 – WHS Wisconsin Historical Society Tour and Research – Bonus 4th Friday Leave Van Galder bus station at 7:30? a.m. Arrive at 9:00?  Lori Bessler’s tour.  Library stacks close at 4:30, Library closes at 5:00.

July 13 2018 “Remembering Frances Willard; an Internationally-renowned Leader in the Temperance & Suffrage Movements, From Janesville WI” by Elizabeth Martiniak and Julie Orvis

August 10, 2018 – Familysearch Wiki for Nordic Countries, FamilySearch.org webinar by Liv Anderson – Teaches how to best use the wiki when doing Scandinavian Research

September 14, 2018 “Research Your Overseas Ancestors Without Going ‘Across the Pond”, by Vicki Ruthe Hahn  – Learn how to find your immigrant ancestors’ information in U.S. records, in over-seas on-line genealogy databases, and in other, mostly-free, resources. How histories and maps help track their immigrations. What to do about language barriers.  Emphasis on England, Ireland, Germany, and Norway.

October 12, 2018 – “Downtown Rockton Illinois Devastated by Fire on October 31, 1907”, by Steve Balsley

November 9, 2018 – “Genealogy Clues found in Obituaries and Funeral Home Records”, by Betsy Swisher

December 14, 2018 – “Laurence Ousley of the Beloit Public Library – Researching and Writing an African-American Family Life Story”, by Vicki Ruthe Hahn 

 

A Fun Photo Discovery

A Fun Photo Discovery

by Vicki Ruthe Hahn

SGS Stateline Genealogy Sorter

I was able to date (my 2 x Great Grandmother’s) Lucy Adams Leighty’s dress from researching and presenting my program several times on “Contemporary Fashion through the Decades – How to Identify Our Ancestors’ Timelines  by What They Wore, When”.   I am learning the time periods of some of the historic styles by sight.

Here is Lucy Adams Leighty’s 1897 dress:

Lucy Adams dress 1Lucy Adams dress 2Lucy Adams dress 3Lucy Adams dress 4

My sisters and brother have been working on a 600+ pages family photograph book; Chris is creating the book, all of us donated photographs, two of us (Melodie and I)  are editing and doing genealogy research (as fast as we can) to fill in gaps, and I have been writing family stories about our ancestors based on research.  So much for waiting until I semi-retire someday and have more time to do all that!  🙂
Greg, our third cousin from Pennsylvania, has been invaluable in donating old family photographs and filling in family history.  We connected due to an Ancestry.com DNA test match.
If the “book” is ever published on paper, we would have to split it into 2 books.  The cost would be about $1 per page through the program that my sister is using.  We may just print one copy and give everyone else a DVD or electronic version.  What a great way to preserve family history.  The very last revision needed from me was to write a story to go with these photos.
My niece Andrea had done research on this dress for her college costuming history class.  She had surmised that Lucy made the special dress for her own wedding (in 1867).  This is not the correct style for that time period.  And Andrea had put in examples of 1890s dresses. 
Hint – don’t let preconceived notions of family stories detract you from the evidence, “i.e. “This must have been Gt Gt Grandma’s (1867) wedding dress.”  Keep your mind open to see the possibilities.  Look for clues and pieces of the puzzle that fit together.
While writing this history story last night, I discovered the fun photo discovery:
I was right – the dress is from 1897!  Lucy sewed the dress for her to wear as mother-of-the-bride at her daughter’s wedding!
Lucy Adams (probably) beautifully sewed this dress herself.  It’s style of fitted sleeves with a small puffed upper “leg of mutton” is from about 1897, when Lucy would have been age 60.  She married William Smith Leighty on March 29, 1867. They had five children in 20 years. Lucy and her husband were farmers in Morgan, Ohio.
Lucy may have worn a small bustle with the dress, as the back is longer by about an 1 1/2 inches.  It has a one-piece fitted bodice with hook and eye closure, and full skirt which was a little less full than the style (as a cost savings?)  The special fabric – a print of white flower sprigs on dark blue/black,  and the black lace collar, indicate that she made it for a special occasion, probably her daughter Annetta’s wedding.
One of Lucy’s children was our paternal Great Grandmother Annetta Leighty Jewison.  Annetta married Charles Oscar Jewison on February 17, 1897, in McDonough, Illinois. They had three children during their marriage, including our paternal grandmother Muriel Helen Jewison Ruthe.
Great Great Grandma Lucy would have used this as a Sunday dress afterward.

How to Search an Address in Ancestry.com

How to Search an Address in Ancestry.com

by Vicki Ruthe Hahn

SGS Stateline Genealogy Sorter

9-14-2017

The question was – how do I find more information about a house (in Beloit WI)?

I just now discovered how to do that searching in Ancestry.com (Library edition at the Library.)

Note that I did not put any names of people in, nor did I use ” quote” marks on the address.  I got thousands of results when putting the address in “Place your ancestor might have lived”.  It seems to bring up all of Beloit, even when putting in the house number  and street name.  So that does not work.

The same happens if you put the address in “Lived in” or “Any Event” and “Location”.

What does work is to click “Match all terms exactly” AND put the complete address in “Keyword” and click “Exact”.  I did not even capitalize the street correctly.  You can select the entire correct entry when the typing prompts auto fill choices.

Ancestry.com keyword

Here were the results I got, which were all from 1930 U S Federal Census, even though I chose “All categories”.  The fifth person’s name was a different house number on Highland Ave.  I’m not sure why it was included, or why I did not get more hits.  Probably not enough Beloit City Directories, etc. loaded onto Ancestry yet. But this gives you some more people’s names to trace back the history of a house in City Directories, etc.:

Results 1–5 of 5

Name:  Louisa Devine
Birth:  abt 1860 – Wisconsin
Residence:  1930 – Beloit, Beloit, Rock, Wisconsin, USA
Name:  Archie Devine
Birth:  abt 1896 – Wisconsin
Residence:  1930 – Beloit, Beloit, Rock, Wisconsin, USA
Name:  Archie Devine
Birth:  abt 1919 – Wisconsin
Residence:  1930 – Beloit, Beloit, Rock, Wisconsin, USA
Name:  Frank Devine
Birth:  abt 1921 – Wisconsin
Residence:  1930 – Beloit, Beloit, Rock, Wisconsin, USA
Name:  John L Briggs
Birth:  abt 1906 – Michigan
Residence:  1930 – Beloit, Beloit, Rock, Wisconsin, USA
Other places to look, and ask for the Librarians to help.  I keep getting to know our Beloit Local history better the more I help folks.:

Historic Wisconsin buildings : a survey in pioneer architecture, 1835-1870

Perrin, Richard W. E., 1909-
[Milwaukee, Wis.] : Milwaukee Public Museum, 1981. 1981

Location Call No. Status
 Beloit Adult Non-Fiction  720.9775 P428h  ON SHELF
 Beloit Adult Non-Fiction  720.9775 P428h  ON SHELF

BOOK1981.

Other relevant

Other relevant titles

entries 3-9

3

Architectural and historical intensive survey report : City of Beloit, Wisconsin

Sheboygan, Wis. : Legacy Architecure, Inc. ; 2016. 2016

Location Call No. Status
 Beloit Genealogy & Local History  GEN 720.9775 Architectural 2015-2016  REFERENCE
And
Beloit City Directories and old phone books at the Library
And
29 Early Beloit City Directories, Phone books, and history books that are digitized online at the Beloit Public Library Homepage: “Beloitlibrary.org”  > “Discover< investigate, Grow” > “Genealogy and Local History” >

Beloit Local History Digitization

And

In the indexes of the “Book of Beloit 1836 – 1936” and “Book of Beloit II 1936-1986”.

And

In the local history pamphlet file.

And

On the many Beloit area historic maps that are in our Library Local History/Genealogy collection.