Category Archives: Vicki RUTHE HAHN – Stateline Genealogist

Stateline Travelers – Part 6 – A Stateline Celebration for 100 Year-old South Beloit, Illinois and Me

Stateline Travelers – Part  6  – A Stateline Celebration for 100 Year-old South Beloit, Illinois and Me

Part of an on-going series by

Vicki Ruthe Hahn, Stateline Genealogy Sorter.

June 24, 2017

 

South Beloit, Illinois will be celebrating 100 years this year.

Their Centennial Celebration will be August 24 – 27, 2017.

Sout Beloit 100

Beloit Wisconsin and South Beloit, Illinois have been linked for our entire history.

Next week the Beloit Public Library is opening their new coffee and food shop, “The Blender”.

I am welcoming South Beloiters to Beloit Public Library to visit “their” GEN Club and Coffee shop here in Beloit.

Opening the week of June 26, 2017

https://www.facebook.com/blendercafebeloit/#

Color Logo Grey Text

Blender interiorBlender sign

What a great place to go for a refreshing drink, smoothie, bakery snack, soup, sandwich, breakfast, lunch, or supper –  after doing genealogy at Beloit Public Library, after a Stateline Genealogy Club @ Beloit Public Library program.

12StatelineGenealogyClubLogo-lg(1)

…0r anytime.  I believe that the open hours of The Blender will be something like 7 a.m. – 7 p.m. Monday – Thursday; and 7 a.m. – 3 p.m. Friday and Saturday.

Maybe we can raise a “toast” to great collaborations between Beloit and South Beloit for another 100 years.

I was the Director of the South Beloit Public Library from 1991 – 1993.  Then I got a job as the Head of the Circulation Department at the Beloit Public Library, and I am still here, 24 years later, as the Public Services Librarian.

Catherine Hayes (at that time the former, former South Beloit Public Library Director) was the historian of South Beloit.  All historical knowledge stated here is from the book, “Our Golden History-South Beloit Illinois”, which is a non-copyrighted work by Catherine Hayes.  She wrote the book to inform the people South Beloit of their pre-incorporation roots for the Sesquicentennial.

Catherine and I had many friendly conversations, as she helped me learn how to be a library director, and taught me about the history of South Beloit –

“Always a City, never a Village!”

The South Beloit Centennial Committee is writing a new Centennial history book.

 

 

In 1818, the United States Congress told the people of the Territory of Illinois to form a state government.

A heated debate arose over the correct placement of the northern state line of Illinois.

If the old line of 1787 (Northwest Territory) were kept, Illinois would be much smaller than Wisconsin,

and Chicago would be in Wisconsin because Illinois would have no Lake Michigan shoreline.

A bill passed cutting 8,500sq. miles off of Wisconsin and adding it to Illinois, creating the current state line.

 

By 1838, the village of Turtle became Beloit.

South Beloit became the south part of Beloit.

 

Winnebago County voted in 1842 for annexation to Wisconsin.

However, the south had more people and out-voted the north.

So Winnebago County remained in Illinois.

 

They (south of Beloit) petitioned to become their own city in 1914.

In September 17, 1917, South Beloit became a city.

Hint – these are the newspapers from Rockford Illinois that would also cover South Beloit Illinois:
Winnebago – Rockford   Crusader                  1952 – 1971
Winnebago – Rockford   Morning Star          1961 – 1963
Winnebago – Rockford   Register Star           1988 – 2007
Winnebago – Rockford   Register-Republic  1952 – 1972
The Rockford Public Library should have these on microfilm.
You can contact them for a search if you cannot get there yourself.
We have the Beloit Daily News (in microfilm at Beloit Public Library, Wisconsin)
which also covers news for South Beloit Illinois.
South Beloit does not have their own newspaper that I know of.
We would be glad to look up local history for you, but Beloit Daily News is not indexed for all the years.
We would need to know which date – at least the month and year.
For requests, please send us more information to our Interlibrary loan email.
Or you can contact me at the BLOG email StatelinegenealogyClub@yahoo.com

Happy Anniversaries to Us

Happy Anniversaries to Us

It has been a lot of fun, and I have learned so much from all of you, and from finding/writing  interesting articles to help you.

I always write as “Vicki Ruthe Hahn, SGS Stateline Genealogy Sorter” if the posting is all my own writing.

If it is someone else’s work, I always put a reference to other writer’s work and add:

A special “shout-out” to Judith Nichols, who brought the idea of a genealogy  club to the Library, and helped me lead it for awhile.

Stateline Genealogy Club @ Beloit Public Library is 5 years old.

AND

Blog  “StatelineGenealogyClub.Wordpress.com” is 3 years old.

Vicki Ruthe Hahn is the Blog creator of:

“StatelineGenealogyClub.Wordpress.com”                                                 June 15, 2014 ;

and the founder of:

Stateline Genealogy Club @ Beloit Public Library                                   April 13, 2012

 

As of June 20, 2017, there have been:

There are 12 WordPress followers, 40 email followers (total 52);

27 likes & 92 comments.

One day there were 62 views, the most ever.

These views seem to be in addition to Followers looking at emails.

My BLOG doubled with 2254 views in 2015, & 5164 views in 2016.

Half-way through 2017, there have been 2,396 views.

These were from 37 countries in 2015; & 77 counties in  2016, and

62 countries in 2017 so far.    Some just show 1 view per country, but

many have several views, so I feel that I am helping genealogists

throughout the world.

3 Year Anniversary Achievement

Happy Anniversary with WordPress.com!

You registered on WordPress.com

3 years ago.

Thanks for flying with us.

Keep up the good blogging.

Stateline Travelers – Part 5 – My 3 x Gt-Grandma , and Me. She got teeth & fashion!

Stateline Travelers – Part 5 –

My 3 x Gt-Grandma , and Me.  She got teeth & fashion!

by Vicki Ruthe Hahn, SGS Stateline Genealogy Sorter

Part of an On-going Series

June 11, 2017

Photo composite fun.

Imagine my shock when I realized that these two different looks were the same person – my great great great grandmother, Catherine McIntosh Greenup.

I love looking for the stories as I do family histories, and piecing them together verbally and visually.

In about five years, she completely changed fashions, and became confident (new teeth?) and very urban sophisticated.  She dressed less like the unsophisticated Virginia/Kentucky country look, and more like the “big” city of Macomb, Illinois look.

This is one of the slides that I composed for my genealogy program – “What They Wore When” or “Contemporary Fashion Through the Ages – How to Tell Which Timeline Your Ancestors Are, by What They Wore.”  I have given the program three times, and am booked for two more presentations in the next few months.

 

3 x Gt Grandma photos

 

 

Hint – I never expected to find that I had any ancestors from Kentucky.  Try to learn about all states that your ancestors lived in.

Kentucky was granted statehood in 1792.  it became the fifteenth state in the US and the first state west of the Appalachian mountains.

So it looks like my Gt-Gt-Gt Grandma Greenup was born in Kentucky 17 years before it became a state, and there are zero chances that there will be a state vital record of that.

 

 

Numbering Systems for Genealogy Family Trees

Numbering Systems for Genealogy Family Trees

by Vicki Ruthe Hahn

(SGS) Stateline Genealogy Sorter

May 31, 2017

Numbering systems were used more in the past for keeping track of generations in family trees.  This was the only way to keep generations of families straight on hand-written forms, family pedigree charts, and for recording in books.   Once software tracking became possible, most of the numbering, sorting, and tracking of people became more automated.

People new to genealogy have not had to know how to do any of the various numbering methods.  There are times that using a numbering system might help.

I do not know much about these methods, and had to look a long time to find any information about how to use them.

I do know that on Legacy software, the RIN numbers, automatically assigned to each person, can change.  They are not important for organizing except for the computer to keep track of individuals.

Some of the most popular numbering systems are: Ahnentafel (Sosa-Stradonitz Method), and the Register, NGSQ, Henry, d’Aboville, Meurgey de Tupigny, and de Villiers/Pama Systems.

I have used the Ahnentafel numbering system while filling out pedigree family charts.  It is very handy, and makes an easy tracking system, once you understand it.  I have even gotten to a second page of the 5 or 6 generation family pedigree charts.

Ahnentafel, also known as the Eytzinger Method, Sosa Method, and Sosa-Stradonitz Method is the numbering of ancestors beginning with a descendant. This system allows one to know an ancestor’s number without looking at the list and allows one to know an ancestor’s relationship based on their number.

The number of a person’s father is the double of their own number, and the number of a person’s mother is the double of their own, plus one. For instance, if the number of Sam White is 10, his father is 20, and his mother is 21.

See more about how to do that and other numbering systems:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genealogical_numbering_systems

Genealogy Numbering Systems (National Institute) – https://familysearch.org/wiki/en/Genealogy_Numbering_Systems_(National_Institute)

http://www.saintclair.org/numbers/

 

 

My tribute to all the military horses, mules, and donkeys that “served” or lost their lives in Wars

My tribute to all the military horses, mules, and donkeys that “served” or lost their lives in Wars

by Vicki Ruthe Hahn

(SGS) Stateline Genealogy Sorter

May 31, 2017

Vicki’s note- Photo posted by Horse.com on Facebook.com. I wrote this Posting based on information found at http://www.mulemuseum.org/history-of-the-mule.html, Wikipedia.com, Amazon.com, and Horse.com, and excerpts of commentators’ information.  This is an addition to Memorial Day tributes to all the human war veterans:

army horse tribute

American soldiers paying tribute to all the horses that lost their life in World War I.

The photograph was taken in 1917 at Camp Cody, New Mexico. The men kept fainting from the heat that day, so it took 8 hours to take the picture.  This shows a Cavalry unit – 650 officers and enlisted men of Auxiliary Remount Depot No 326.

The photo taken in 1918 was officers and recruits standing in the shape of the Liberty bell.

Horse, mules, and donkeys were “drafted; they did not volunteer. They acted against their nature by running toward guns shelling fire.  They suffered horribly in the U.S. Civil War, and World Wars.  The Allied forces had millions of horses, and countless mules and donkeys, which died from gunfire, wounds, starvation, thirst, exhaustion, disease, bad weather, miserable conditions, and exposure.

Army Horses

WWII German pack horses – similar conditions for pack mules and all wars.

Hugh Lofting fought in the trenches during World War I.  He created the idea for “The Story of Doctor Dolittle” (published in 1920) when he observed the lack of compassion shown to the horses on the battlefields. While he served, Lofting wrote stories about Dr Dolittle in his letters home to entertain his children.

Pack mules made the U.S. Army (and other countries’ armies) mobile. Mules had tremendous stamina, and carried food, supplies and ammunition to battles, returning with wounded soldiers.

Landscape

WWII U.S. pack mule

Mules were critical in the Civil War. The Union Army had (purchased) about one million mules. The South only had about half as many mules, most of which the soldiers brought from their farms. The Southern farms then did not have mules to do plowing. Some historians suggest that the shortage of mules might have contributed to the South ultimately losing.

Mules were used in World War I and (less in) World War II.  They could go where rough terrains were not usable by motorized vehicles. About 8,000 mules died in those wars. Enemy submarines targeted supply ships carrying mules to destroy supplies and the means of transportation.

Six Mules hauled 2,000-pound wagons that were loaded with 3,000 pounds of cargo (including mule’s feed). In mountainous areas a train of 50 (plus) mules (in single file), carried 250 pounds each, and traveled 60 miles a day.

“War Horse” is a novel by Michael Morpurgo, made into a Broadway play, and a movie. The story, based on true events, is a tribute to all the horses that died in WW I. The horses in the play were puppets operated by three puppeteers.

“Animals in War”, by Jilly Cooper, has many true stories about the devotion and loyalty of horses, mules and donkeys to their military masters during war.

At the ends of the Wars, cavalry soldiers could not bring their horses home and officers ordered them to shoot them.

The army kept its horses and mules into the late 50s.

Did any of your military (cavalry) ancestors have the care of horses, mules, or donkeys?

 

 

New Old Beloit Newspaper Microfilm and a Magnifying Machine at the Library

New Old Beloit Newspaper Microfilm and

a Magnifying Machine at the Library

by Vicki Ruthe Hahn

SGS Stateline Genealogy Sorter

May 26, 2017

Thanks to our Library cataloger, we now have some long-awaited microfilms available (and a few more to come.)

There were many newspapers published in Beloit, Wisconsin before ( and contemporary to) the Beloit Daily News.

The Beloit Public Library will be closed on Monday, May 29 for Memorial Day, but take the time to research your military ancestors at home.

And come another time to see if any of these newspaper microfilms have your Beloit ancestors:

“Daily Graphic”, Beloit, Wisconsin – January 13, 1877 thru July 28, 1877.

“Daily Outlook” Beloit, Wisconsin – Two reels

December 20, 1881 thru May 31, 1882

June 1, 1882 thru November 22, 1882

You can also use the new magnifying machine in the Genealogy and Local History Collection area (similar to this image).  It was donated by a library patron.  It is very easy to use to enlarge one of our maps, small print in a book, etc.  It even has a reverse positive/negative that you can use to help interpret tricky handwriting, etc.

 

How do I find out what the dwelling number was on a street by using the (ED) Enumeration District numbers on a Census?

How do I find out what the dwelling number was on a street by using the (ED) Enumeration District numbers on a Census?

by Vicki Ruthe Hahn (including information found on the U.S. Census Bureau
National Archives and Records Administration)

(SGS) Stateline Genealogy Sorter

May 26, 2017

The short answer – I don’t know yet.  This is what I have found out so far, and I will update this post as I learn more.

(Just a note – The 1950 census records will be released in April 2022.)

What is an enumeration district?
An enumeration district is the geographical area that was assigned to a single census taker.

For information on locating and understanding U.S. census records, see Finding Answers in U.S. Census Records, by Loretto Dennis Szucs and Matthew Wright. This book covers the federal population schedules, state and local census schedules, and special census schedules.  This book is in our collection 929.1 Sz71f, and checked out.  I have it on hold, and will try to find more answers after reading it.

“The genealogist’s census pocket reference : tips, tricks & fast facts to track your ancestors”,  from Allison Dolan and the editors of Family tree magazine, Cincinnati, Ohio : Family Tree Books, c2012. c2012  Look for this book in GEN 929.1 Dolan.

To learn more about enumeration districts, the following reference materials might be useful. (These are available at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. and at NARA’s regional records services facilities.)

  • Enumeration District Maps for the Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930. (National Archives Microfilm Publication M1930), 35 rolls
  • Index to Selected City Streets and Enumeration Districts, 1930. (National Archives Microfilm Publication M1931), 11 rolls.
  • Descriptions of Census Enumeration Districts, 1830-1950. (National Archives Microfilm Publication T1224), rolls 61-90.

Note: To complement its collection of 1930 resources, The National Archives has also purchased copies of city directories for 1928-1932. For a complete list of which directories it has, see NARA’s website. These are not National Archives publications, but can be purchased from Primary Source Microfilm (an imprint of the Gale Group). For ordering information call 1-800-444-0799.

There are also a few reference books at Hedberg Public Library in Janesville, WI about enumeration.

What are the definitions of terms used in the census?

  • Census__1) a counting of the population; 2) the actual pages of the census schedules
  • Enumeration__another word for taking the census
  • Enumerator__a census taker
  • Enumeration district__abbreviated as ED, it is the area assigned to one enumerator in one census period; 2 to 4 weeks in 1930.
  • Institutions__Hospitals, schools, jails, etc. that were given separate EDs for the 1930 census.
  • NP or nonpopulation__an ED where no one lived. Noted as “NP” in the catalog.
  • Precinct__the limits of an officer’s jurisdiction or an election district
  • Place__specific geographic places or features such as streets, towns, villages, rivers, or mountains.
  • Schedule__the pages that the enumerators filled out when taking the census
  • Soundex__an indexing system based on the way a name is pronounced rather than how it is spelled.
  • Void__an ED that was combined with another ED. Noted as “void” in the catalog
  • Useful Web Sites:

For general information on the 1930 census, see these websites:
U.S. Census Bureau
National Archives and Records Administration

What questions were on the 1930 Census?

  • Place of abode

    Street, avenue, road, etc.
    House number
    Number of dwelling house in order of visitation
    Number of family in order of visitation

These definitions were used consistently through the years.  I have tried some of the Stephen P. Morse aids below for a family’s location in 1920, 1930, and 1940. Tell me is you have found success with using them, or finding the street numbers for a family.  I did not find any more information than I did by searching Ancestry.com.  I was looking for the house street number for where I knew that they lived.  It is a small town.  Unless the enumerator wrote down the street number, you will only see the Street name and numbers indicating the order of what order he/she visited for dwelling and family.

I have seen that some enumerators on some years did write down the dwelling number.  Take note of the neighbors on either side (order of visiting) and look for them in later year’s censuses.  Even if “your” family has moved, you might run across a later marking of dwelling numbers for the neighbors, and be able to tell what “the” house number was.

The street names change too.  Ask at the local library and historical center for that area.  They may have a folder on “your” family, or know more about the location names.

Indexes and Other Finding Aids

Individual census records from 1790 to 1940 are maintained by the National Archives and Records Administration, not the U.S. Census Bureau.

Publications related to the census data collected from 1790 to 2010 are available at https://www.census.gov/prod/www/decennial.html.

Visit the National Archives Web site to access 1940 Census records—http://1940census.archives.gov.

Decennial census records are confidential for 72 years to protect respondents’ privacy.

Records from the 1950 to 2010 censuses can only be obtained by the person named in the record or their heir after submitting form BC-600 or BC-600sp (Spanish).

Online subscription services are available to access the 1790–1940 census records. Many public libraries provide access to these services free of charge to their patrons.

Contact your local library to inquire if it has subscribed to one of these services.  We have Ancestry.com and HeritageQuest.

The Flood of 1973 in Beloit Wisconsin and South Beloit Illinois

The Flood of 1973 in Beloit Wisconsin

and South Beloit Illinois

by Vicki Ruthe Hahn

SGS Stateline Genealogy Sorter

April 3, 2017

A  loose- leaf book, about The Flood of 1973 in Beloit, Wisconsin and South Beloit, Illinois, was “presented”  to the Beloit Public Library by Robert Solem in 1973?  It was updated in 2011 by a (prefers not to be named) volunteer who had additional (personal) information that doubled it into a 123 page book.  He labeled the photographs, added location indicators and most of the pertinent 1973 Beloit Daily Newspaper articles (copied from the Library microfilm.)  Our volunteer then scanned the final product and gave both to the Beloit Public Library for local history.  Both versions are implied fair-use copyright for the Beloit Public Library.

I am endlessly grateful for the good that these volunteers, and others, do to help further the work of easier access to information about local history and genealogy.  From transcribing historic books into readable form, scanning, labeling, arranging, creating indexes and bibliographies, etc. – all are blessings.  Although, I am not able to link the digital copy to my BLOG, I wanted you to know the added good that will come of these volunteers’ efforts.

We got an ILL Interlibrary Loan request from a researcher at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.  He wanted the original Reference book, which we do not send out of the Library.  That is so all you fine folks that visit libraries can access our local history.

That researcher will be using the flood information to build a model to help evaluate why the flood(s) happened.  The information will helpfully prevent future floods here, and elsewhere. I have requested that the researcher update me on his results, which I will include in a future Posting.

Looks like I will have to be sending the books pages in several emails.  That is entirely made possible and easy by the scanning that my volunteer did of this book.

The physical book is available to look at in the Beloit Public Library Genealogy and Local History Collection:

Title       The Turtle Creek flood, April 21, 1973 : Beloit, Wisconsin & So. Beloit, Illinois. With updated annotations Fall of 2011

Imprint [S.l. : s.n. ; 1973?]

Beloit Genealogy & Local History              GEN 363.34936 Turtle 1973         REFERENCE

Description         1 v. (loose-leaf) : chiefly ill. ; 30 cm.

Note      “Presented by Robert Solem”–Cover.

Subject Turtle Creek (Rock County, Wis. and Winnebago County, Ill.) — Flood, 1973.

Beloit (Wis.) — History.

South Beloit (Ill.)

 

Here is more information on historic flooding in the area, from the Beloit Historic Society.

Individual Membership
1 Year – $25 Membership at the The Beloit Historic Society   is well worth the value of receiving the 6 times a year newsletters filled with unique stories about Beloit history.  It also gives you a chance to support local history efforts in Beloit.

Another chance soon to support the Beloit Historical Society is to come hear my (short version) program – What They Wore When.  April 12, 2017.  This is one of several great programs that BHS Kelly Washburn is offering to the public.

BHS

Beloit Floods:

http://www.beloithistoricalsociety.com/newsletter/08_03.pdf

Beloit Flooding 1

Beloit Flooding 2

 

 

Donating Local History Documents and Photographs

Donating Local History Documents and Photographs

by Vicki Ruthe Hahn

SGS Stateline Genealogy Sorter

April 3, 2017

This is part of a  reply to a generous person who wanted to share an important hand-written local history document so that others could access it.  This is an important reminder to all of us to share information about our family’s histories that may help others from the local communities where they lived.

The Beloit Public Library has a special bookcase for books, booklets, or papers,  on people and families connected with Beloit, and two lateral pamphlet file cabinets for local (stateline) history.

>>>>

Thanks so much for taking the initiative to let me know about the unique hand-written resource that you have on Roscoe history.

The very best place to donate that document would be the Roscoe North Suburban Public Library branch, as the Library is open more hours than even the local history societies.

(Donate copies of your family photographs too.  Each Library and historic society will have their own requirements and restrictions on what donations they will accept.  Please ask them first.)

There does not seem to be a historical society for Roscoe, IL (although there is one for Rockton Township.

The 2 North Suburban Libraries act as Roscoe’s historical society.

They have a local history collection (as does the Loves Park main library). I lived in the second oldest house (1839) in Roscoe for 12 years. When I sold that house, I donated a (mostly) hand-written mortgage deed to the Roscoe branch library (Reference desk).

You can read about that house, and more about Roscoe and Macktown IL, and Beloit WI history on this post from my BLOG:

Stateline Travelers – Part 3 – This Old House and Me

If you ask them to send you a written acknowledgement, you can use it if you itemize tax deductions. I have no clue what the value would be.  Ebay/Craigslist would give you ideas.

That Library also has a full copy of this book which I just found online (the index). There are Benders listed, but no Moshers.

The Story of Roscoe, Illinois

All history is not on computer or electronic media, especially local history. (Which is a common mis-conception.)  About 80% of genealogy/history resources are online at this time.  More are being added everyday, but many are in paid sites.

Even that 20%, facebook, and email,  has made genealogy searching so much easier than it used to be.  Not too long ago, people had to go from courthouse to library to historical society in person, or write letters, to find their family history.

I am sure that the growing numbers of (baby-boomer) retirees plus ease of searching has led to the recent growth in popularity of genealogy as a hobby.

I am continuously building up our Beloit local history collection, and some state-line history, but we have limited room.

Thanks again, for the generous offer, and information.

Now I will know that your document will be in a place that I (and others) can access easily.

Photographs in a Family Tree

Photographs in a Family Tree

by Vicki Ruthe Hahn

SGS – Stateline Genealogy Sorter

3-26-2017

My family collaborated on creating a 6-generation family tree including photographs. Our main motivation was to get something for our Mom (Daisy Bennett Ruthe) to enjoy.  She has been having dementia for several years, and wanted a picture of each person, so that she could remember who each one was, and who belonged to who.

My sister Chris used a great on-line photograph book-making program, http://mikescamera.com/books-full.html , to make family memory books. She photographed my (second) wedding and made a book for my husband and I.  (Look for promo discount codes online for Mikescamera).  Mom doesn’t know that she will be getting a book soon also.

The program that Chris used for the photograph family tree is Aperture, but she is not sure Apple still supports it.

Another (genealogy fan) sister, Melodie, and I helped Chris with the dates and names of the 6-generation ancestors.  A third cousin (Ancestry.com DNA test respondant!) sent me several family photographs so that we could add more faces for our ancestors which we did not have in our photography collection.

Chris put in different silhouettes for any ancestors that we did not have photos for.  This is the top part of the large sheet, which Chris had laminated.  I did not include any living relatives in this photo (3 more generations.)

Capture

                                                          Our Mom, Daisy, is here   

                                                                  and here. 

20170309_122857

Daisy was happily surprised, “Just What I needed!”  She had a great time re-discovering all of her family/ancestors, and her grand/great-grand children.  It literally took me a couple of minutes before I could take this photograph.  My camera phone was balking, and I had to reboot the camera before it would work.  Mom was still pointing out folks.

Chris insisted that we had to get this project finished and get it to Mom asap.  She was  right.

I have been away from work and too busy to post on my BLOG lately.  My Mom has been in the hospital for observation due to her having visual hallucinations.  The diagnosis is not final yet, but it looks like a more severe form of dementia.  As POA, I will be even more busy with helping her.

The good thing is that I have been able to spend lots of time with her, and am writing down all of her Daisy Stories as she tells us her memories.

Don’t wait.  Always let your people know that you love them, and record their stories.