Free Access to MyHeritage.com Military Records

Free Access to MyHeritage.com Military Records

20May2020

Vicki’s note – limited free access May 20 – 25 MyHeritage.com

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Free Access to Military Records

In honor of Memorial Day in the U.S., we’re offering free access to all military collections on MyHeritage, which include over 57 million records, between May 20 and May 26, 2020. Discover fascinating information about your ancestors and relatives who served in the military.

Search now »

 

Atlas of Historical County Boundaries

15May2020

Atlas of Historical County Boundaries

Vicki’s note – I found a new site for us to “play” in.  It shows all of the following, and  more.

Helpful for finding the name/boundary changes for Counties.  For example Wikipedia shows Monroe County, Virginia is now Monroe County, WEST Virginia. The northwestern part of Virginia decided not to  secede with the rest of the state at the start of the Civil War, so Monroe County and several other counties became a new Union state.  Monroe County was in Virginia from its beginning 14 Jan 1799 until 20 Jun 1853.  From that point on it was Monroe County in West Virginia.

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State Data

Select a state from the map to view all of the Atlas’ content related to that state, including shapefiles, chronologies, and metadata.

If you are having trouble viewing the map or clicking on it, try the list of states page.

 

National Data

Click the map above for national data files, historical commentary, and metadata are also available.

Boundary Animations

  • US Historical State & Territorial Boundaries, 1783-2000 (0:30) [graphic]

    US Historical State & Territorial Boundaries, 1783-2000 (3:00)

  • US Historical County Boundaries, 1629-2000 [graphic]

    US Historical County Boundaries, 1629-2000 (0:30)

  • US Historical County Boundaries, 1629-2000 (3:00) [graphic]

    US Historical County Boundaries, 1629-2000 (3:00)

  • US Historical County Boundaries (1629-2000), with State/Territorial boundaries (1783-2000) (0:30) [graphic]

    US Historical County Boundaries (1629-2000), with State/Territorial boundaries (1783-2000) (0:30)

  • US Historical County Boundaries (1629-2000), with State/Territorial boundaries (1783-2000) (3:00) [graphic]

    US Historical County Boundaries (1629-2000), with State/Territorial boundaries (1783-2000) (3:00)

  • US Historical State & Territorial Boundaries, 1783-2000 (0:30) [graphic]

    US Historical State & Territorial Boundaries, 1783-2000 (0:30)

New, Temporary Resources Now Available in BadgerLink

11May2020

Vicki’s note – Resources available to Wisconsin residents, especially through your Library home page.  just posted on Beloit Public Library Facebook page:

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New, Temporary Resources Now Available in BadgerLink

Wednesday, March 25, 2020

Thanks to past and present vendors, we now have 4 new, temporary resources in BadgerLink, provided to Wisconsin residents during the COVID-19 pandemic when access to more licensed, quality information is of the greatest importance.

Access NewspaperARCHIVE

Newspaper Archive is pleased to offer access to their 300 million page newspaper collection to all Wisconsin residents through May 15, 2020.

EBSCO Ebooks Academic Collection

EBSCO is pleased to offer access to eBooks Academic Collection to all Wisconsin residents through June 28, 2020.

Academic Search Ultimate

EBSCO is pleased to offer access to Academic Search Ultimate to all Wisconsin residents through June 28, 2020.

Business Source Ultimate

EBSCO is pleased to offer access to Business Source Ultimate to all Wisconsin residents through June 28, 2020.

Vendor

 

Stateline Genealogy Club LLC – On Hold

Stateline Genealogy Club LLC – On Hold

Vicki Ruthe Hahn

April 29, 2020

You know I hate to do it.
No time right now to figure out webinars, etc. to get “live” Vicki presentations to you.
My Mom passed away last week, and I am her executor.
I was allowed to be with her the last week.
I am also sewing and administering a volunteer home made  Facebook Face Mask group WFMW Wisconsin Face Mask Warriors for Walworth County.
I don’t even get time to do my own genealogy!
To be rescheduled: The Stateline Genealogy Club LLC Program at Beloit Public Library, Beloit WI for Friday May 8, 2020 It was for 10 a.m. – noon “Organizing, Scanning & Preserving Print & Digital Photographs”, several Webinars.
The Beloit Public Library will be open sometime the end of May, but programs will be limited to 10 people until further notice.
AND also to be rescheduled:
June? – Road Trip to Newberry Library, Chicago. Sign up, carpooling with shared gas costs, Meet at BPL. 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. plus travel time.
We will reschedule Club programs when it is safe from Covid 19 to meet. This may affect September, October, and November programs ?? I hope not.
I will keep you posted on BPL Library schedule and any other presentations scheduled at other locations.
If we look to history, 1918 Influenza lasted quite awhile (into 1919/1920).  It should be better in modern times, but Covid 19 rules.
I will definitely hold Genealogy programs as soon as we can know that it is safe. Hopefully not that long!
I hope you are all well, and safe, and happy relaxing while doing your genealogy research.

To be rescheduled: The Stateline Genealogy Club LLC Programs

To be rescheduled: The Stateline Genealogy Club LLC Programs

10Apr2020

By Vicki Ruthe Hahn

To be rescheduled:

The Stateline Genealogy Club LLC Program at Beloit Public Library, Beloit WI for Friday April 10; 10 a.m. – noon “Which DNA Test? How to Use the Results in Your Genealogy Research”, Two Webinars.

The Beloit Public Library is closed indefinitely, and we will reschedule Club programs when it is safe from Covid 19.

This will probably affect May, and ??

I will keep you posted on BPL Library schedule and any other presentations scheduled at other locations.

Covid 19 Face Mask Warriors

Covid 19 Face Mask Warriors

9Apr2020

By Vicki Ruthe Hahn

Image may contain: 1 person, possible text that says 'We Can Do It! COVID-19 MASK MAS MAKERS'

This is what has been keeping me busy.  No time for doing genealogy  or BLOG right now.  This is history in the making, and what our descendants will be researching in the future.  What are you doing in this Covid 19 Pandemic?  Document it for posterity.

I wrote a procedure for sewing face masks to specifications of (many) of the medical facilities preferences as a member of the WFMW Wisconsin Face Mask Warriors.  The 4 page procedure for sewing face masks (as in photo above) is on their “Files” link, if you are interested.  Feel free to share, while I retain the copyright.  I created the procdure to help others.

I am sewing face masks for distribution as fast as possible . The requests from medical facilities and first responders was 100,000 on the April 2 youtube newscast below.

I sewed and gave these face masks to my USPS mail carrier to be delivered (no postage) to my local USPS office Postmaster for their staff.

There are Face Mask Warriors (FaceBook) groups of volunteer sewers/distributors in each state coordinating the free supplying of hand-sewn face masks to our medical and front-line facility Warriors.  Below is more about the Wisconsin WFMW group.

Check out the Wisconsin Face Mask Warriors Group in the news! This video is a fantastic explanation of what we are doing and why it matters! To date we have given out more than 15,000 masks in NE WI alone and every day we get more requests. Check out our group for more information and to see how you can get involved ❤️
If you know a facility in need of masks, the link for the donation request form is here.
Face Mask Warriors try to meet northeast Wisconsin’s demand

 

Face Mask Warriors try to meet northeast Wisconsin’s demand

Image may contain: 1 person

Ancestry.com Library Edition Temporarily Available from Home

25Mar2020

Ancestry.com Library Edition is temporarily available from home, if you have a BPL Beloit Public Library card.
Something that I alerted BPL about last week when informed by my sources.
This Applies To Other Libraries Who Have The subscription for their patrons, and libraries in other states than Wisconsin.

https://www.lakeshores.lib.wi.us/ancestry/login.pl

Covid 19 Corona Virus Affects Stateline Genealogy Club Presentations

Covid 19 Corona Virus Affects Stateline Genealogy Club Presentations

16Mar2020

Vicki Ruthe Hahn

Update – Now the Beloit Public Library has closed completely from today Monday until further notice.  I will keep you all posted on the status of future Club programs at the Library, and my Presentations outside of the Library.

Meanwhile, stay home.  Time to do genealogy on-line.  Look for more Postings here as I get time to learn something genealogical to share with you. 

Good health to you all. Be prepared, not scared.

CANCELED! CAGGNI Event – Colonial Special Interest Group – 21 Mar 2020

CAGGNI Event – Colonial Special Interest Group – 21 Mar 2020

UPDATE! 18Mar2020:

Upcoming event information:
CANCELED – Colonial Special Interest Group – Mar 2020 Schaumburg Library, Roselle & Schaumburg Rds
Date: 21 Mar 2020 12:45 PM CDT
CANCELED – Colonial Special Interest Group – Mar 2020

Due to the coronavirus outbreak, the Schaumburg Library has closed all events in their meeting rooms. Therefore CAGGNI is canceling all its meetings through March. We will be back in touch with any new information.

Interested in exploring your Colonial roots? Then this is the special interest group for you!

The March meeting will cover researching Massachusetts and Mayflower ancestors.

Facilitators: Bob Allen and Mary Hoyer

For more information: CANCELED – Colonial Special Interest Group – Mar 2020

Best regards,
CAGGNI

………

Vicki’s note – a good way to get ready for the 400th Mayflower anniversary this year.  (CAGGNI) Computer Assisted Genealogy Group of Northern Illinois event.

Event Announcement: Colonial Special Interest Group – 21 Mar 2020
Upcoming event information:
Colonial Special Interest Group – Mar 2020 Schaumburg Library, Roselle & Schaumburg Rds
Date: 21 Mar 2020 12:45 PM CDT

Colonial Special Interest Group – Mar 2020

Interested in exploring your Colonial roots? Then this is the special interest group for you!

The March meeting will cover researching Massachusetts and Mayflower ancestors.

Facilitators: Bob Allen and Mary Hoyer

For more information: Colonial Special Interest Group – Mar 2020

Other Travelers Part 10 – Tracing the 1918 Flu Epidemic

Other Travelers Part 10 – Tracing the 1918 Flu Epidemic

(Originally posted)  02Apr2018

(Part of an On-going Series – “Other Travelers”)

by Vicki Ruthe Hahn – SGS Stateline Genealogy Sorter

Image result for covid-19

(Re-issued 05Mar2020 : I have seen worldwide fatality rates of 3 – 5% for the 1918 Spanish Influenza (mostly young adults).  This may help us get perspective on the current Covid-19 Corona virus with what I hear so far are Worldwide death rates of 2 -3% (mostly elderly people).   The rate may actually be lower as many cases were not reported in China at the beginning.  “The death rate from seasonal flu is typically around 0.1% in the U.S.”  – Read an additional article from Lifescience.com about Covid-19 compared to flu here.)

Have you gotten the flu this season?

Not the 24 hour stomach flu (which is bad enough), but the upper respiratory Influenza A or B?  Flu has hit this year especially hard, killing several children. But it is nothing close to the amount of deaths in the Pandemic of 1918.

Perhaps your ancestors were affected by that epidemic – one hundred years ago this year?  Whole families were wiped out.

 

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Let’s get some insight:

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From Standford Children’s Health:

“What are the different types of influenza?

Influenza viruses are divided into three types designated as A, B, and C:

  • Influenza types A and B are responsible for epidemics of respiratory illness that occur almost every winter and often lead to increased rates of hospitalization and death. Public health efforts to control the impact of influenza focus on types A and B. One of the reasons the flu remains a problem is because the viruses actually change their structure regularly. This means that people are exposed to new types of the virus each year.
  • Influenza type C usually causes either a very mild respiratory illness or no symptoms at all. It does not cause epidemics and does not have the severe public health impact that influenza types A and B do….
  1. A person infected with an influenza virus develops antibodies against that virus.
  2. The virus changes.
  3. The “older” antibodies no longer recognizes the “newer” virus when the next flu season comes around.
  4. The person becomes infected again.

The older antibodies can, however, give some protection against getting the flu again. Currently, three different influenza viruses circulate worldwide: two type A viruses and one type B virus. Vaccines given each year to protect against the flu contain the influenza virus strain from each type that is expected to cause the flu that year.

What causes influenza?

An influenza virus is generally passed from person to person through the air. .. with infected person who sneezes or coughs. The virus can also live for a short time on objects …can get the flu virus by touching something that has been handled by someone infected with the virus and then touching his or her own mouth, nose, or eyes.

People are generally the most contagious with the flu 24 hours before they start having symptoms  (emphasis mine) and during the time they have the most symptoms. That’s why it is hard to prevent the spread of the flu, especially among children, because they do not always know they are sick while they are still spreading the disease. The risk of infecting others usually stops around the seventh day of the infection.”

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See the source image

Most entertainments, churches, social clubs, libraries, movie houses, etc. were eventually shut down.  But they tried wearing masks for awhile!

Officials Wearing Gauze Masks

Milkmen(?) braving the Flu to deliver milk to stores, and to people’s homes

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The Flu Epidemic rapidly made many children orphans, dependent on the care of others.

Many families died of neglect or starvation, remaining isolated in their homes, afraid to come out for supplies or medical attention.  Some neighbors were afraid to enter the homes of those who were sick.  So many medical doctors were in the War, ill, or overwhelmed.  anyone with medical training was asked to help, and some communities recruited  volunteers to care for the sick.

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From Standford University, by Molly Billings, June, 1997 modified RDS February, 2005:

“The influenza pandemic of 1918-1919 killed more people than the Great War, known today as World War I (WWI) … It has been cited as the most devastating epidemic in recorded world history. More people died of influenza in a single year than in four-years of the Black Death Bubonic Plague from 1347 to 1351. Known as “Spanish Flu” or “La Grippe” the influenza of 1918-1919 was a global disaster…

In the two years that this scourge ravaged the earth, a fifth of the world’s population was infected. The flu was most deadly for people ages 20 to 40. This pattern of morbidity was unusual for influenza which is usually a killer of the elderly and young children. It infected 28% of all Americans (Tice).

An estimated 675,000 Americans died of influenza during the pandemic, ten times as many as in the world war. Of the U.S. soldiers who died in Europe, half of them fell to the influenza virus and not to the enemy (Deseret News). An estimated 43,000 servicemen mobilized for WWI died of influenza (Crosby). 1918 would go down as unforgettable year of suffering and death and yet of peace…

The effect of the influenza epidemic was so severe that the average life span in the US was depressed by 10 years.   (Emphasis mine.)…

In 1918 children would skip rope to the rhyme (Crawford):

 

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History is reflected in children’s games, and in songs.

(“Ring-around-the Rosie” is NOT from the time of the Black Plaque!)

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The mandatory gauze masks were not always very effective.  There is the story of 4 women who wore masks while playing cards one evening.  By the next morning three of them were dead from Influenza.

 

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In an effort to boost the War effort, President Woodrow Wilson (and others) initially tried to ignore the pandemic, and suppress news about it.  How depressing that so many of those who survived the war, ended up dying of influenza.  Whole shiploads of military men were affected, some never making it to serve in the War.

The cause of most of the deaths in this pandemic was the secondary pneumonia.  There were no antibiotics.  Influenza frequently has secondary infections – strep throat, ear infections, Pink Eye, etc.  But this time it was more than that. (see explanation below.)

Be alert if you see several people in your ancestor’s family die suddenly, and within a few days of each other, especially if between September 1918 and about June 1919.  A death certificate may not mention flu/influenza, but pneumonia, etc. as cause of death.  Or there might not have been a police officer/medical person/undertaker/county recorder available to make any registration. (see explanation below.)  Some members of the family may have been buried in a mass grave with no records.

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From History.com

The first wave of the 1918 pandemic occurred in the spring and was generally mild. The sick …experienced … typical flu symptoms….

However, a second, highly contagious wave of influenza appeared with a vengeance in the fall of that same year. Victims died within hours or days of developing symptoms, their skin turning blue and their lungs filling with fluid that caused them to suffocate….

Despite the fact that the 1918 flu wasn’t isolated to one place, it became known around the world as the Spanish flu, as Spain was hit hard by the disease and was not subject to the wartime news blackouts that affected other European countries. (Even Spain’s king, Alfonso XIII, reportedly contracted the flu.)

One unusual aspect of the 1918 flu was that it struck down many previously healthy, young people—a group normally resistant to this type of infectious illness—including a number of World War I servicemen…. Forty percent of the U.S. Navy was hit with the flu, while 36 percent of the Army became ill, and troops moving around the world in crowded ships and trains helped to spread the killer virus.

Although the death toll attributed to the Spanish flu is often estimated at 20 million to 50 million victims worldwide, other estimates run as high as 100 million victims. The exact numbers are impossible to know due to a lack of medical record-keeping in many places.

…Even President Woodrow Wilson reportedly contracted the flu in early 1919 while negotiating the Treaty of Versailles, which ended World War I.

When the 1918 flu hit, doctors and scientists were unsure what caused it or how to treat it. Unlike today, there were no effective vaccines or antivirals, drugs that treat the flu. (The first licensed flu vaccine appeared in America in the 1940s….)

Complicating matters was the fact that World War I had left parts of America with a shortage of physicians and other health workers. And of the available medical personnel in the U.S., many came down with the flu themselves.

Additionally, hospitals in some areas were so overloaded with flu patients that schools, private homes and other buildings had to be converted into makeshift hospitals, some of which were staffed by medical students.

Officials in some communities imposed quarantines, ordered citizens to wear masks and shut down public places, including schools, churches and theaters. People were advised to avoid shaking hands and to stay indoors, libraries put a halt on lending books and regulations were passed banning spitting… the Sanitary Code.”

The flu took a heavy human toll, wiping out entire families and leaving countless widows and orphans in its wake. Funeral parlors were overwhelmed and bodies piled up. Many people had to dig graves for their own family members.

The flu was also detrimental to the economy. In the United States, businesses were forced to shut down because so many employees were sick. Basic services such as mail delivery and garbage collection were hindered due to flu-stricken workers.

In some places there weren’t enough farm workers to harvest crops. Even state and local health departments closed for business, hampering efforts to chronicle the spread of the 1918 flu and provide the public with answers about it.

By the summer of 1919, the flu pandemic came to an end, as those that were infected either died or developed immunity.

Almost 90 years later, in 2008, researchers announced they’d discovered what made the 1918 flu so deadly: A group of three genes enabled the virus to weaken a victim’s bronchial tubes and lungs and clear the way for bacterial pneumonia.

Since 1918, there have been several other influenza pandemics, although none as deadly.”

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The 1918 Spanish Flu Pandemic was world wide:

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The ultimate “other Travelers” in this story are the viruses and bacteria that exploded throughout the world for those 15 months 1918 – 1919.

PBS has a very good “American Experience” documentary of the topic

Aired January 2, 2018

Influenza 1918

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/films/influenza/

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The American military in World War I and the influenza pandemic were closely connected. Influenza spread in The crowded conditions of military camps in the United States and in the trenches of the Western Front in Europe. The virus traveled with military personnel from camp to camp and across the Atlantic military transit ships.  September – November 1918, influenza and pneumonia sickened many in the military at the height of the American military involvement in the war.  This affected the war.

US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

Public Health Rep. 2010; 125(Suppl 3): 82–91.

INFLUENZA IN THE CAMPS

(read the entire article by clicking the links above.)

“…the virus traveled west and south, arriving at Camp Grant, Illinois, on Saturday, September 21, 1918, with 70 hospital admissions. “So sudden and appalling was the visitation that it required the greatest energy and cooperation of every officer, every man, and every nurse to meet the emergency,” wrote one observer.4 (p. 749) Hospital admissions rose to 194, then 370, then 492, to a high of 788 admissions on September 29. Hospital officials summoned all officers on leave, converted barracks to hospital wards, and by “extreme effort” expanded the hospital capacity from “10 occupied beds to a capacity of 4,102 beds in six days.”4 (p.751)

Influenza still overwhelmed every department. The hospital laboratory resorted to local civilian facilities to perform specimen tests. Camp ophthalmologists saw patients with conjunctivitis, an influenza complication, and ear, nose, and throat specialists saw those with other dangerous secondary infections. As individuals became seriously ill, camp officials sent out “danger” or “death” telegrams to families and loved ones, but soon they received so many return calls, telegrams, and visitors, they had to set up a separate hospital tent as an information bureau. Medical personnel were not immune. Eleven of the 81 medical officers fell ill, and three civilian and three Army nurses died. The epidemic even caused the Medical Department to drop its prohibition on black nurses so that Camp Grant called African American nurses to care for patients. The women had to wait, however, until separate, segregated accommodations could be constructed.”

 

National Archives: World War I Centennial

As the largest repository of American World War I records, the National Archives invites you to browse the wealth of records and information documenting the U.S. experience in this conflict, including photographs, documents, audiovisual recordings, educational resources, articles, blog posts, lectures, and events.

Veteran’s Service Records:

https://www.archives.gov/veterans

 

 

 

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