Getting to Know William Graydon’s Family, and Me – Here’s the Punchline!

By Vicki Ruthe Hahn

8-11-2017″

Duhhhh! I forgot to tell you the punchline this morning.

Great questions on my Stateline Genealogy Club @ Beloit Public Library program today.

“Getting to Know William Graydon’s Family, and Me – a Study Showing Genealogy Research Methods and Regional Connections”.

The biggest Stateline/regional connections are these:

Major Jesse Meacham’s extended family (I think) is connected to the 1833 founding of the community West of Chicago – Meacham Grove, Illinois

(I believe that this is the “Chicago” that Major Jesse Meacham, and later, Elizabeth Lulu Booth visited before going to Troy WI.)

While Jesse Meacham went on to found Troy, Wisconsin (where William R Graydon’s family later moved),

Caleb Blodgett bought a farm/acreage in Meacham Grove, Illinois.

After a short while, Caleb Blodgett sold his Illinois land, and moved to Wisconsin.

The French trapper Joseph Thiebault (Tebo) was the first white man who came to the Beloit Wisconsin area in 1820.  He was married to two American Indian wives at the same time.

Stephen Mack was the first white settler (mid 1830s) in the Rockton Illinois area, and was married to Hononegah, a Native American woman from one of the surrounding tribes.  He founded Macktown, Illinois.

Tebo and Stephen Mack knew, and traded with each other.

Caleb Blodgett bought “three looks” of land in 1836 from Tebo, and founded what became Beloit, Wisconsin.

Caleb Blodgett knew, and traded with, Stephen Mack of Macktown Illinois (near Rockton).

 

And now you know (some of ) the rest of the story!

 

Solving Photo Mysteries

Vicki’s Note – Maureen has given us some efficient steps on how to effectively search for solutions to our unknown ancestors in mystery photographs.  We can find the answer to the “I know they are my ancestors, but I don’t know who they are” quandary.

I have found her books and her BLOG invaluable to find photograph identification answers.  Maureen is one of my genealogy heroes.

 Solving Photo Mysteries

 Maureen A Taylor – photodetective.  FamilyTreeMagazine.com

Sunday, August 06, 2017

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There’s a Good Chance This Photo Mystery Is Solved!
Posted by Maureen

Last week’s Photo Detective post about this family introduced four steps to tackle a mystery photo:

1.    Establish a time frame.

2.    Focus on place.

3.    Search for records.

4.    Watch for matches.

Barbara Rivers’ photo depicts a set of parents and their five children.  Based on the clothing clues, I dated the image to circa 1897.

As I suggested, Barbara went back through her genealogical material and add a bit more detail to her original query:

  • Barbara thinks the family lived in Blackhawk, Grundy County, Iowa.  A more specific location will hopefully make finding a match easier.
  • The last name of Findlay, which may belong to this family, has variant spellings including Findley or Finley. Spelling differences aren’t uncommon. Our ancestors used different versions of their own names, and census enumerators didn’t ask for the correct spelling.

Since the surname is variable, Barbara should do a broad search of censuses. Most genealogy websites automatically look for variant spellings as long as you don’t filter results to exact spellings.

I estimate the ages of the children in this photo between 20 and early 30s.  In the 1880 census, they’d all be living in their parents’ household. By 1900, several of the children may have moved away.

Barbara found a Joseph F. Findlay in the 1880 census and a Joseph T. Findlay in the 1900 census, whom she believes to be the same man. Both were born in Pennsylvania, and married in Illinois to a woman with the same name.

Finding a Match

I found Joseph F. and Joseph T. Findley in FamilySearch censuses. In 1880, Joseph F. had children Alpheus (20), Thomas (17), Fatima (12), Abbie (10) and Emery (6).

Adding 17 years to their ages for an estimated 1897 photo date gives us Alpheus (37), Thomas (34), Fatima (27), Abbie (27) and Emery (23). This identification seems to fit the mysterious photo.

Next, I’d encourage Barbara to do “reverse genealogy,” and research forward in time to find descendants of all these children. She then could reach out to find out photographs of them and verify that the faces match.

Identify your old mystery family photos with these guides by Maureen A. Taylor:

·  Family Photo Detective: Learn How to Find Genealogy Clues in Old Photos and Solve Family Photo Mysteries

·  Fashionable Folks: Bonnets and Hats 1840-1900

·  Finding the Civil War in Your Family Album

·  Hairstyles 1840-1900

·  Photo-Organizing Practices

·  Preserving Your Family Photographs

·  Searching for Family History Photos: How to Get Them Now

 

 

LegacyFamilyTree.com software 1/2 price sale EXTENDED to August 20; AND 15% off Coupon too!

1/2 price sale EXTENDED to August 20!

Vicki’s Note – A coupon from Thomas MacEntee to apply toward the sale 1/2 price for buying the Deluxe 9 version of Legacy Family Tree Software. 

MyHeritage.com and LegacyFamilyTree.com are joining.  There is a big sale on the software through August 13.

This is the software that I use to help tame my ever-growing collection of genealogy research information.  It was finally enough savings to prompt me to purchase the upgrade from version 8.  One can also download a free version. 

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Save an Additional 15% Off Legacy Family Tree’s Super Sale!

Did you know that Genealogy Bargains has EXCLUSIVE COUPONS to save you an additional 15% during the Legacy Family Tree 50% Super Sale?

PLEASE NOTE: The post content below contains affiliate links. See disclosure statement below.

Legacy 9.0 Released with Amazing New Features. Check out the new features you’ll find in the highly-anticipated new version of Legacy Family Tree Software: Hinting, Reports and Charts, FindAGrave.com Searching, Online Backup, Stories, Hashtags, Compare 2 People, Color Coding, and dozens of other enhancements!

Additional 15% Savings During Legacy Family Tree Super Sale!

You may have heard that Legacy Family Tree is set to be acquired by MyHeritage in the near future (read the news here). To celebrate this amazing event, you can get some amazing discounts on Legacy software as well as Legacy Family Tree Webinar memberships (see below).

BUT WAIT! BEFORE YOU BUY, make sure you use the following promo codes to save an additional 15%!

  • Legacy 9 Deluxe Software: regularly $34.95, now just $17.48 – click HERE and use promo code thomas15leg at checkout to bring the price down to just $14.86!
  • Legacy Family Tree Webinars: 1 Year Membership (new or extension), regularly $49.95, now just $24.98 – click HERE and use promo code thomas15 at checkout to bring the price down to just $21.23!

NOTE: If you want to order BOTH the software and the webinar membership, order them as as separate transactions in order to use the promo codes and save.

Click HERE to save – via Legacy Family Tree

***

PLEASE NOTE: The post content above contains affiliate links. This means I make a percentage of sales via these links. This does not INCREASE the price you pay as a consumer. It simply supplements my income so I can continue providing as much free genealogy content as possible through my “abundance model.”

DisclaimerAll prices and offers are subject to change. Some items may be sold out and have limited inventory. Also check to see if you have automated purchase settings enabled, such as Amazon Buy with 1-Click: it is your responsibility to make sure you are getting the correct price for an item before you check out and finalize the transaction.

Disclosure statement: I have material connections with various vendors and organizations. To review the material connections I have in the genealogy industry, please see Disclosure Statement.

©2017, copyright Thomas MacEntee.  All rights reserved.

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Legacy 9.0 Deluxe (software for PC on CD & download, printed & PDF manual)

Price: $39.95 $19.98
Status: Digital products have immediate download availability. Shipped products begin shipping 2nd week of May.
Weight: 1 lb, 0 oz
Quantity: 1

Includes:

  1. Legacy 9.0 Deluxe software on CD and via download.
  2. Legacy Charting Deluxe software (installed when Legacy 9.0 is installed)
  3. The official 301-page Legacy 9.0 User’s Guide, printed and PDF editions.
  4. Legacy for Beginners training video (on installation CD).

Sophisticated research tools, powerful search capabilities, and professional-quality trees, reports, and books make the award-winning Legacy Family Tree the program of choice for users of all levels and abilities. Search the Internet for billions of genealogy records.

After your order is processed, your unique Legacy 9 Customer Number will be immediately available to you on screen and in your receipt.To upgrade from Legacy 8.0 Deluxe (or earlier Deluxe editions), click here.

NEWS! MyHeritage Acquires Legacy Family Tree

6:26 p.m. August 3, 2017

 

Legacy News

Heraldry and Titles of Rank

Vicki’s note – “Heraldry Websites for Genealogy” is an article from FamilyTreeMagazine.com  on a topic that we don’t often see.  Interesting to read that Coat of Arms does not = Surname.  I still claim the few  Coats of Arms that I know associated with some of my ancestor’s surnames, and “my” Muir family castle in Ireland.

I think in America (U.S.A), that we don’t concern ourselves much with the conventions of heraldry and distinctions of  titles of rank.  I even saw places on-line where anyone can buy title of rank, so I think that the whole world’s attitude toward the (mostly former) formal distinctions is relaxing.

This is not to insult my BLOG’s British, Scottish, and Irish, etc. viewers.  I do realize that titles of rank are still very important and current in your cultures.

I am adding all of these links to my BLOG “Genealogy Links and Electronic Helps” page.

And wow – look at the rare gem of a website that I found today.  You get two related articles/sources in one Posting –

Read more about the Titles of Rank in this really extensive website.  After reading through these lists, I may have to reconsider my statement about “mostly former distinctions” above.  My anthropological and history background reminds me that humans have set up hierarchies and named distinctions as an on-going aspect of being part of human cultures.

There are a lot of wide-ranging lists here at – http://www.sunderedspheres.com/titles-of-rank.html

That website includes:

“Ranks of All Nations Possible” historic & modern – i.e.

Royal and Noble Ranks, Modern and Historic Military Ranks, Modern and Historic Political Ranks,  Modern and Historic Religious Hierarchy, Monastic ranks, Knights/Militant Ranks,  Historical Titles and Classes, Scots, Welsh, Irish, British, Byzantine, Estonian, French, Germanic, German, Saxon, Gothic, Greek, Hungarian, Italian, Languedoc (Southern French), Norse, Roman Empire, Russian, Slovenian, Spanish, Egyptian (Ancient), Hausa & Mali, Hindustani,  Islamic/Religious, Japanese, Mongol, Moorish, Persian, Semitic & Hebrew, Swahili, Turkic, Turkish, Chileno, United States, and Miscellaneous Ranks

The first part of that website states:

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Titles of Rank

Ranks and their Definitions:

The following social ranks are given from highest to lowest instead of alphabetically.  The titles given are first male then female, and the etymology is terrestrial.  

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Heraldry Websites for Genealogy

7/21/2017
This list of resources will get you started in researching heraldry.

Myth: Many surnames have a coat of arms.

Fact: Coats of arms are not attached to a surname, but rather to an individual. People with the same surname may be entitled to different coats of arms, or not have one at all, unless they can prove that they are directly descended from a legitimate male member of that line – or one is granted to them.

Are you researching heraldry?

Here are some resources to start:

The American Heraldry Society

Heraldica

College of Arms

Heraldry for Genealogists 

Institute of Heraldic and Genealogical Studies—UK

American College of Heraldry

Coats of Arms from Ireland

And just for fun, this website explores the real history, heraldry and family trees that inspire Game of Thrones. Warning: contains spoilers.

Access Newspaper ARCHIVE PDF View Discontinued

Vicki’s note – Update from WI Libraries for Everyone – this is one of the major databases that we use for searching for (non-Beloit) historic newspapers at the Beloit Public Library.  I use it a lot for my own research for my family, and for others.

It is still available for free on our Homepage, through Badgerlink in Wisconsin.  Other States have different ways to access it, as each state chooses whether to pay for access (to this and other databases) for their citizens.

The only thing I found for Illinois so far is this:

The Illinois History –Digital Imaging grants expand access to electronic collections through the Illinois Digital Archives database maintained by the Illinois State Library (thru Jesse White, the Secretary of State. To view the collections and other historical artifacts, visit the Illinois Digital Archives website at http://idaillinois.org/.

We will just have to get used to using it a different way.  If you have not used historic newspapers in your family sleuthing, I recommend that you try this out.  I will be using it again soon to see how the new method works.

WI Libraries For Everyone:

Access Newspaper ARCHIVE

PDF View Discontinued

Access NewspaperARCHVE PDF View Discontinued

Posted: 21 Jul 2017 09:11 AM PDT

Friday, July 21, 2017

After September 30, 2017, in Access NewspaperARCHIVE, you will no longer be able to view an article as a PDF. But don’t worry, you will still be able to download newspaper pages as PDFs.

The PDF viewer is being discontinued because PDF images are much larger than the JPEGs, taking a considerable amount of time to download and also putting a massive load on Access NewspaperARCHIVE’s servers. Additionally, Adobe Viewer is a third party platform which means Access NewspaperARCHIVE has no control over how the end product is displayed to the user.

After the transition away from the PDF Viewer, you will still be able to download in 2 easy steps.

1. Click on the envelope in the toolbar.

2. Select Save as PDF.

Written by:
Kara Ripley, Resources for Libraries and Lifelong Learning

Please Site Your Genealogy Sources; OR How to Keep Your Ancestors & Their Stories Straight

Please Site Your Genealogy Sources; OR How to Keep Your Ancestors & Their Stories Straight

Vicki’s note – article from AncestralFindings.com  .  A reminder that taking the time to cite all of our genealogy sources for each fact is important. The main goal is to document your path so that you, (and others) can find that information in the future.

It is the difference between having a fun hobby, and maybe a sloppy family tree; OR being  (a more) professional genealogist “that ensures you have an accurate family tree where everyone is where they are supposed to be.”

I find that (when I am being good and cite my sources), I can see all of the places to search again.  We may see a person listed as a witness, etc. and then we find later that he/she is our relative.  Where did we see his name?

Ask me how I track sources/facts for a person with a time-line linked to the sources, as I find them.  We don’t discover the facts of a person’s life in a tidy lifespan order.  Time-lines are a great way to organize the events by occurrence.

The Legacy Family Tree.com genealogy software has a good free edition , (which you can download with that link), and a deluxe paid edition.  I suggest trying out the free edition using their sample George Washington family tree.  Both editions have Source Writer templates that are based on Elizabeth Shown Mills’ “Evidence Explained” so help to ensure that all the necessary source information is included.

Would your family history sources pass peer review?  If you ever want to write an article or have a book published on genealogy, they must pass peer review.  Yikes, I better stop having fun searching, and do the mundane task of validating my sources as I go!

The Dangers of Being Careless on Citing Resources in Your Genealogy Research

One of the most important parts of genealogy is citing your sources. Doing good genealogy research means making it something others can trust and follow. Sources allow other researchers to do this and use your research with confidence. Good sources also allow you the confidence of knowing your research is as correct as it can be with your current information. Using source citing shows good genealogical scholarship, and shows you to be a serious researcher and not just a casual hobbyist. Citing sources is also required if you are submitting any of your work to genealogical journals.

As you can see, you must cite your sources to be looked upon as a good genealogist. However, you also have to be careful in citing your sources. Make sure they are accurate and attached to the correct facts. Here are some of the dangers of being careless in your source citing in your genealogical research.

1. You May Get the Wrong Source Attached to the Wrong Fact

Be careful when citing your sources, especially on genealogy family tree software programs. It can be easy to accidentally put a source on the wrong fact. This not only makes your work look sloppy and unprofessional to other researchers, it can be confusing for you when you look at your research later. If you look up a source to confirm a fact as you go further back on that family line, you won’t be able to connect the two, resulting in you being unaware of where you actually got the fact you cited. Anyone using your work as a source for their own research will come across the same problem, and that particular fact, or even all the work you did on that line, will become useless to them. It can also lead to embarrassment if your research gets published in a genealogical journal and someone notices the citation and the fact don’t match each other.

2. You May Not Be Able to Understand Your Citation Later

There is a proper way to cite genealogical sources. You usually cite the entire source, including the name of the publication, the author, the repository, and the date you accessed it, the first time you use it. Subsequent times the source is used, it can be abbreviated. But, if you don’t cite it in full and accurately the first time, you may not understand it, or your abbreviations, later. Don’t think you won’t ever need to check a source again. The more work you do on a family line, the more likely you are to need to use your sources to re-confirm information. If you have recorded your sources in a way you can’t understand them later, they will be useless to you. It is well worth it to invest in a book on how to properly cite genealogical sources for this very purpose. “Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace,” by Elizabeth Shown Mills, is considered the definitive publication on the subject.

3. You Can Get People and Family Lines Confused With Each Other

Many families reuse names again and again over the generations. There are also surnames that are quite common, and if you have different family lines in the same area with the same surname, it can get confusing keeping people straight. Making sure your source citations are accurate can keep people straight for you. If you don’t cite sources, or cite them incorrectly or illegibly, you can easily get people confused. You might put someone in the wrong generation, or mix up one line of your family with another that uses similar names and is in a similar location. Good, careful source citation minimizes these risks and ensures you have an accurate family tree where everyone is where they are supposed to be.

It may seem like a hassle to write or type your sources for every genealogical fact you include on your family tree, but it is worth it. It is also worth it to take the time to do it correctly. Don’t be careless with your genealogical source citation, and you can be relatively sure you’ve got an accurate family tree that will stand up to the scrutiny of even the most diligent genealogy scholars.

 

AncestralFindings.com

Will founded Ancestral Findings back in 1995. He has been involved in genealogy research for over 20 years. The thrill of the hunt, the adventure, and the excitement begin when he started investigating the meaning of his Moneymaker surname. Why I Love Genealogy (And You Should, Too!)

Tracing your German immigrant ancestors?

Vicki’s note – here is a bit of information on German immigration to the United States, and a chance to take an on-line class from FamilyTreeUniversity.com

I include it in my BLOG,  as there is a big interest in German Genealogy.  Being “German” is the biggest percentage of ancestry in the United States.

Course Runs: Oct 9th 2017 – Nov 3rd 2017
$99.99

 

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German Genealogy: Ride the Waves
James M. BeidlerGerman Genealogy 101Family Tree University

 

Tracing your German immigrant ancestors? Here are two things to think about: German immigration to the Americas came in two waves. The first as a cluster in the 1700s. The second wave spans from about 1800 to 1920. But not all German emigrants came west: a sizable portion went to Russia, where German enclaves lasted up to the twentieth century. Learn more…

Genealogists with German roots have a wealth of resources and a wide support network to help them discover their past. Germans have been meticulous record-keepers throughout their long history — beginning with the mostly tiny, independent German states that sprung up during the Middle Ages and continuing beyond their 1871 unification. This is great news for genealogists searching for their German family history — as long as you know where to look. To successfully trace your ancestors in the old country, you’ll need an understanding of Germany’s history, its records, and your family’s path to America. In this course, you’ll get a thorough foundation in learning how to perform German genealogy research.

Genetic Genealogy Testing Strategy

Vicki’s note – article from FamilyTreeMagazine.com

 
Two Ways to Create Your Genetic Genealogy Testing Strategy
7/14/2017
You’ve got a limited DNA testing budget but lots of relatives. How do you decide who should be next to test? We’ll show you two ways to create your genetic genealogy testing strategy.

Q. I’ve had autosomal DNA testing done for my father, mother, wife and myself. We’re awaiting the results for my brother’s test. I transferred the Ancestry DNA results to GEDmatch and Family Tree DNA. Whom should I test next? A. The autosomal DNA test traces both sides of your family tree and is helpful in researching the most recent five or six generations. The more distant the ancestor, the less of that person’s DNA you have until he or she “drops off” your genetic family tree altogether. The most basic rule in autosomal DNA testing is to test any relative who doesn’t have both parents living, starting with the oldest generations. But since most of us don’t have the financial resources this approach might require, a testing plan also should take into consideration the reasons for pursuing genetic genealogy. More often than not, test-takers are in one (or both) of two situations:

  • they’re trying to solve a family history mystery
  • they just want to see what they can find out

Your DNA Testing Strategy for Solving a Family Mystery

If you have a family tree mystery, create a testing plan that will maximize your chances of finding out more about the ancestor in question. Set your sights on descendants of the mystery ancestors who are from lines other than yours. Say you’re trying to find the parents of your mom’s dad’s mom—your great-grandmother—Jane Lewis. You carry about 12 percent of Jane’s DNA (you have 50 percent of your mom’s DNA and 25 percent of your grandpa’s), and only about 6 percent of the DNA of each of her parents, the people you’re trying to find. To find out more about Jane’s parents, you need more DNA. Testing any of Jane’s descendants is helpful. But most helpful will be testing your second cousins, people who are descended from Jane’s other children—your grandfather’s siblings. These siblings got different parts of Jane’s DNA than your grandfather did, and passed some of those parts down to their children and grandchildren. Testing a second cousin also lets you differentiate the DNA you received from Jane (and her husband; we can’t separate the two at this point) from the DNA you received from your seven other great-grandparent couples. You can do this by studying the matches you share with your cousins using the Shared Matches, In Common With or similar tool offered by your testing company. In that list of shared matches, look for third cousins who might be descended from Jane’s parents or fourth cousins who might be descended from Jane’s grandparents.

Your DNA Testing Strategy for Seeing What You Can Find Out

If you’re testing not to address a particular question, but just to see what you can find out, try this:

  • Test second cousins from each of your known great-grandparent lines, starting with older relatives.
  • Consider finding a direct paternal line descendant of each of your four great-grandfathers to take a Y-DNA test, which would represent the surnames of each of those lines. The Y-DNA record for these paternal lines can help you sort out how other lineages with the same (or similar) surnames are related.

Get in-depth expertise on DNA testing strategies and results analysis in the genetic genealogy online courses and workshops at FamilyTreeUniversity.com.

 

Apps for Cemetery Visits

Apps for Cemetery Visits

Vicki’s note – article from FamilyTreeMagazine.com

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6/29/2017
Take your genealogy research into the field with these great cemetery apps.

Smartphones and cemeteries go together like ice cream and Grandma’s apple pie. Without your phone, you’d have to pack a map, GPS device, laptop and camera to get around the cemetery, type inscriptions and take pictures. Your phone lets you do it all with one pocket-sized device.

Apps especially designed for cemetery visitors make it easier to accomplish all this (although if the cemetery is remote, see what the app lets you do when you’re offline). Some of these apps focus on exploring particular cemeteries; others cover multiple burial places. Use the URLs provided here to learn more about each app, and download the app from your device’s app store.

And if you’re visiting a large historic cemetery, it’s a good idea to plug its name into your smartphone’s app store. Some of these cemeteries have their own apps to help you navigate the grounds and locate gravesites.

ANC Explorer

iOS, Android • free

This app, introduced in 2012, helps you explore the rich history of Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va. Use it to search for gravesites and other points of interest, get step-by-step directions, view photos of markers and monuments, and follow self-guided tours. You can save photos and favorite places in the new My Content area. The app also delivers notifications of special events and makes it easy to share your photos on social media.

On-site visitors can download the app using the cemetery’s free WiFi in the Welcome Center and Administration Building, or use it at kiosks throughout the cemetery.

BillionGraves

iOS, Android, Windows • free

The BillionGraves website, launched in 2011, introduced its app to allow members to upload gravestone images along with GPS location data to its online cemetery database. There, others can transcribe the inscriptions (unlike on Find A Grave, no one “owns,” a memorial, so any BillionGraves member can contribute to it). You also can search for relatives’ burial sites among the 20.5 million-plus on the site, and be led right there, courtesy of the GPS coordinates.

Find A Grave

iOS, Android • free

Ancestry.com developed this companion app to genealogy’s best-known cemetery website after acquiring the site in 2013. Use it to search for burial information and gravestone images among the 160 million online memorials volunteers have logged at Find A Grave. When you’re visiting a cemetery, the app lets you upload inscription data and photos of graves you visit, and fulfill others’ requests for pictures of their ancestors’ gravesites.

Historic Oakland Cemetery

iOS, Android • free ($1.99 upgrade)

This app takes cemetery visitors on a tour of more than 60 points of interest throughout Atlanta’s Oakland Cemetery, including the “Original Six Acres,” historic African American and Jewish burial grounds, the Confederate section, and others. Photos and narration accompany each landmark. The app includes 10 free landmarks; upgrade to unlock all of them.

iCemetery

iOS • free

Canadians will find this app handy for searching for loved ones in cemeteries from six locations in Canada, including Woodlawn Cemetery in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan; and Mountain View Cemetery in Vancouver, British Columbia. View details such as the deceased’s name, date of death and burial date and location on a high-resolution map, along with your current GPS location. For many records, the app also provides GPS coordinates and displays the grave on a map to help you find it.

Locate Cemetery

Android • free

Got a hankering to see a cemetery? This simple app lets you find and navigate to cemeteries near your location or another place you specify.

Normandy American Cemetery

iOS, Android • free

Ten thousand Americans who perished during the Allied invasion of Normandy in World War II now rest eternally at Normandy American Cemetery in France. Whether you’re visiting in person or from home, this free smartphone app from the American Battle Monuments Commission lets you tour the cemetery, search burials, view military unit histories and learn the stories of those buried. Apps featuring Pointe du Hoc in Normandy and Cambridge American Cemetery in England are also available for download.

War Graves

iOS, Android • free

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s free War Graves app lets you search for graves of 1.7 million British casualties of the World Wars in more than 23,000 cemeteries, memorials and other locations in 153 countries. A directions function helps you find your way, or tap Cemeteries Nearby to find war graves within five miles of your current location. To find a specific gravesite, start with the Find a Cemetery function.

A version of this article originally appeared in the July/August 2017 issue of Family Tree Magazine.

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