Category Archives: Historical Newspapers

MCIGS McHenry County Illinois Genealogical Society 2019 Summer Conference

MCIGS McHenry County Illinois Genealogical Society 2019 Summer Conference

10 March 2019

Vicki’s note – my favorite stateline conference to attend. Great world-class speakers, nearby, inexpensive.  Speakers – Lisa Louise Cooke, Jay Fonkert, CG,

Michael Lacopo, DVM, and Diahan Southard.

I have gone the last few years and will be there this year:

 

MCIGS 2019 Summer Conference

Saturday, July 13, 2019
​8:00 am-3:30 pm
McHenry County College
8900 U.S. 14, Crystal Lake, IL 60012
Download a brochure

Registration

Early registration: (February 15, 2019 – June 15, 2019)

  • Members $50.00
  • Non-members $50.00*

​       * Due to an error in our marketing materials, all early registrants will receive the price of $50.00.

Late Registration: (Postmarked after June 16, 2019)

  • Everyone: $75.00

(Lunch not guaranteed for registrations received after 6/30/19)

$20 Fee will be charged for cancellations prior to 6/16/2019.
No Refunds after 6/16/2019.

We encourage you to register online for the event.  Alternatively, you may download a registration form and send in your payment.

Newspapers.com Library Edition – World Collection now available

Vicki’s note – Wisconsin residents (and visitors to Wisconsin) now have access to this historic newspaper database which replaces Access Newspaper Archives.  It will be available through the Beloit Public Library homepage soon –  “beloitlibrary.org” > “resources“.  You can also access it here. Newspapers.com Library Edition – World Collection!

At the Library, we have relied so much on Access Newspaper Archives for local and Wisconsin genealogy reference answers.  Wisconsin Badgerlink had to seek new database contracts, and Proquest’s Newspapers.com Library Edition – World Collection won the bid.  Yet it took awhile (months) for the final contract, so we have been without historic newspaper content on-line.  We will see how this one compares, but I am glad to have any after so much time.

Thank you Wisconsin for coming through with this.

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Newspapers.com Library Edition – World Collection now available

Monday, October 29, 2018

The BadgerLink Team is pleased to announce the availability of Newspapers.com Library Edition – World Collection!

Wisconsin residents now have access to historical newspapers from the 1700s – 2000s. Newspapers.com contains thousands of well-known regional, state, and small local newspapers in the United States and other countries. There are 150 Wisconsin-specific titles including the Janesville Daily Gazette, the Racine Daily Herald, the Eau Claire Leader, and many more. New content is continually added as it becomes available.

Newspapers.com allows users to browse and read historic newspaper content directly from their web browser or mobile device as well as save or print clippings. Newspaper content is presented in its original form, so overall context is preserved. All the pages on Newspapers.com have been indexed using Optical Character Recognition (OCR) which allows users to search for specific names and keywords across all available papers.

Newspapers.com joins the Archive of Wisconsin Newspapers and U.S. Newsstream to provide Wisconsin residents with a robust collection of newspaper content, both current and historic. Take a look at our Wisconsin Newspapers in BadgerLink Title List for a complete listing of Wisconsin newspapers available in BadgerLink.

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Wisconsin Folks – New Britannica and EBSCO Resources (and Historic Newspapers) Now Available for Badgerlink!

Wisconsin Folks – New Britannica and EBSCO Resources (and Historic Newspapers) Now Available for Badgerlink!

9-24-2018

Vicki’s note – Historic newspaper searches on-line are not available yet, but coming soon through Beloit Public Library’s home-page “beloitlibrary.org“.  Access Newspapers Archives have not been available for a few months while the State of Wisconsin has been in contracts negotiations.

“Newspapers.com Library Edition World Collection and U.S. Newsstream should be ready in the coming weeks. We apologize for the delay.”

Here is an update on the other resources available:

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New Britannica and EBSCO Resources Now Available!

Friday, September 21, 2018

Drum roll, please: new resources are now available in BadgerLink! We appreciate your patience as we rolled out these new resources after completing the BadgerLink Request for Bid procurement process over the summer. Without further ado:

Britannica Digital Learning has added Britannica Library, a comprehensive reference and learning resource for children and adults. Similar to Britannica School but suitable for public library patrons, this edition offers 3 distinct interfaces and reading levels in one site. Britannica School will continue to be available through BadgerLink.

EBSCO will now provide 7 new, upgraded resources.

  • AutoMate: Authoritative and up-to-date service and repair information for thousands of domestic and international vehicles. This resource will be replacing Auto Repair Reference Center.
  • Children’s Core Collection: Reliable guides to help librarians with collection development and maintenance, curriculum support, readers’ advisory and general reference for preschool-6th grade. This resource will be replacing Book Collection Nonfiction: Elementary School Edition.
  • Middle & Junior High Core Collection: Reliable guides to help librarians with collection development and maintenance, curriculum support, readers’ advisory and general reference for grades 5-9. This resource will be replacing Book Collection Nonfiction: Middle School Edition.
  • Senior High Core Collection: Reliable guides to help librarians with collection development and maintenance, curriculum support, readers’ advisory and general reference for grades 9-12. This resource will be replacing Book Collection Nonfiction: High School Edition.
  • Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text: Database providing cover-to-cover indexing, abstracting and full-text for key library and information science periodicals. This resource will be replacing Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts.
  • MasterFILE Complete: Popular full-text magazines, reference books and other sources from the world’s leading publishers. This resource will be replacing MasterFILE Premier.
  • Teacher Reference Center: Research database for teachers providing indexing and abstracts for more than 220 peer-reviewed journals.

We will be removing access to Auto Repair Reference Center, Book Collection Nonfiction: Elementary, Middle & High School Editions; Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts; and MasterFILE Premier after October 5, 2018.

Newspapers.com Library Edition World Collection and U.S. Newsstream should be ready in the coming weeks. We apologize for the delay.

To be notified when the remaining new resources are available, sign up for email alerts. We welcome all feedback and questions, so please contact us!

 

 

In the Genealogy Zone of Serenity

In the Genealogy Zone of Serenity

by Vicki Ruthe Hahn

SGS – Stateline Genealogy Sorter

7-8-2018

See the source image

I spent a great day indoors on the beautifully sunny day this last Saturday July 7, 2018.  What could tempt me to do such a thing on a perfect 80 degree summer gardening day?

(By the way, as I have told you before – Genealogy is the most popular hobby, and gardening is the most popular in the summer.)

The annual (MCGS) McHenry County Genealogical Society Conference was held at the McHenry County Community College, Illinois.  Always professional regional and national genealogy speakers, and great accommodations at a fairly low price. The  MCGS group has it organized well, and improves every year.  This is my third ? year attending.

I learned a lot from all four sessions – one with each speaker.

2018 Jul 7 - MCGS Conference McHenry IL - Vicki Hahn, Judy Russell

Vicki Hahn with the “Legal Genealogist” Judy Russell – who spoke on “NARA Mythbusters: Your  family IS in the Archives”.  I learned how to navigate the complex and thorough government website.  So many records of your family’s interactions with many government agencies!

 

2018 Jul 7 - MCGS Conference McHenry IL - Vicki Hahn, Lisa Alzo

Vicki Hahn with Family Tree University instructor, author, and Slavic Genealogy expert Lisa Alzo “ImmersionGenealogy.com“, who spoke on “Crossing the Pond: successful Strategies for Researching Eastern European Ancestors”.

The closest that my family gets (as far as I know now) is a slight DNA for “Finland/Russia”, but what a lot of great techniques I learned.  And so many links to Slavic websites that Lisa shared.  Be looking for them soon on the BLOG tab ” Genealogy Links and  Electronic Resources”.

Lisa describes –

“What is Immersion Genealogy?

Immersion Genealogy is the process of discovering where and how our ancestors lived, worked, and worshiped, and experiencing first-hand those customs and traditions they passed down through the generations.”

Some hints from Lisa Alzo:

After searching the United State online records, then search the other country’s on-line databases.  Open them in  Google Chrome using that country’s Google, not the United States one – “.com”  If the website doesn’t not have an in “English” button, GC will ask, “Do you want to translate this page?”

When the records are in a foreign language – learn the key foreign words from that country’s FamilySearch.org WIKI.  Learn the words that are on the column headings, or circle the key words if in a paragraph form – birth, marriage, death, burial, father, mother, village, etc..  Look for your ancestor’s original name.

Look for your cousins/ancestor/village on Facebook (Groups), or location photographs on Flickr.com or Ebay.com. (Click on these two links to see some historic Beloit Wisconsin pictures.)

 

David Rencher, Chief Genealogist Officer for FamilySearch.org spoke on “Applied Methodology for Irish Genealogical Research”.  He gave some further insights on how to search for those elusive same-named Irish folks.  Narrow it down to their original name and village. Also look into connections to the rich families in the area – servants were only named in household inventories and did not have their own records early on.  David likened it to searching for African-American slaves before the Civil War.

 

Curt Witcher, Allen County Library’s Senior Manager for Special Collections, spoke on “German Migration into the American Midwest”  focusing on mostly Indiana.  He showed how to use any secondary source for additional information/clues on the history of your ancestors.  David gave several examples of this, including the use of Wikipedia (which I use all the time.)  He even found pertinent references to German immigrant settlement patterns in a Walworth County (Wisconsin) County History book!

I asked Curt to announce our upcoming visit from Astrid Adler to the Beloit Public Library on October 23, 2018.  It was too perfect of a segue-way on the same topic.  He said, “Come to the program and hear from a real German expert on migration to the United States.”  About 25 people took our Stateline Genealogy Club @ Beloit Public Library 2018 Programs handout with information about the 6:30 p.m. program, “Our Ancestors Were German”.  As Astrid is coming from Germany, it really is great to have a wider interest from the area.

David and Curt both said that migration follows language and not religion.  You may find your ancestor in church records not their own.

 

I will be adding the two books on McHenry Illinois, (that I obtained), to the Beloit Public Library Local History Genealogy Collection.:

“McHenry County Illinois Genealogical Society 10th Anniversary 1981 – 1991 Index – Quarterlies, Newsletters.”, 1993.

“1870 McHenry County Illinois Federal Census”, transcribed by Dee-Ann Stambazze, 1992

I also gathered several brochures to share – on several topics/ regional genealogy groups.  We may want to look into going to Newberry Library in Chicago   Lots of resources, like at WHS Wisconsin Historical Society Library in Madison.

 

One of the things that I learned from volunteers at the Chicago LDS Family Center was that FamilySearch.org  intends to have all of their microfilm collection digitized and on-line in 2022.  Some of the bigger Family Centers (like Chicago) have their regional microfilm on-site meanwhile, even though FamilySearch has stopped sending patron’s requested microfilms to any Family Center.  I guess Salt Lake wants to have the microfilm there to digitize 🙂

Lunch was spent speaking with others at the table about genealogy (and quilting!); and sharing information with venders at the booths.  I got three speakers from the venders who are going to present genealogy programs for us in Beloit in 2019.

Marty Acks – from (CAGGNI) Computer Assisted Genealogy Group of Northern Illinois will do a program to be determined – maybe on USGENWEB.org.

Kathy Meade from ArkivDigital.com, a subscription service will do a program on how to find your Swedish roots on-line.

And Rebecca Quinn from CreativeMemories.com – “Your photos and stories + our best quality albums = memories to be shared and enjoyed.”  She will present a workshop on either scrap-booking, or how to do the Lifewriting techniques  of “Snapshots of the Spirit; Capturing Your Current Family’s Stories with Bullet Journaling”.  Rebecca will bring her products for purchase, or supply your own.

I also touched bases with people from two genealogy groups that are having me give programs this year (more on that in another Posting,)

So overall, I’m a happy genealogy camper after submerging in the Genealogy Zone of Serenity.

Maybe I will see you there next year?

 

 

 

Happy Genealogy Search Help Today

Happy Genealogy Search Help Today

by Vicki Ruthe Hahn

Here’s the satisfaction and reward of helping our patrons:

A man and his wife came into the Library looking for genealogy information on his Beloit grandfather who had been injured and hospitalized for decades, estranged from his family.

I was able to find many WI newspaper articles about the circumstances of his death and an obituary.

He had never found that much information in his genealogy searches.

I love Badgerlink Newspaper Access Archives!

Hint – it does not have Beloit Daily News, but many news events get into the other WI newspapers that are covered.

The man gave a $10 donation to the Library in appreciation of my research work,

But even better, he said, “Oh I feel such relief now that I know what happened.”

His wife said, “Now you can sleep and eat again.”

I was near tears.

Genealogy discoveries can be very powerful.

Creating Local History Community Archives, & Protecting Archives from Climate Change

Creating Local History Community Archives,

& Protecting Archives from Climate Change

5-31-2018 (updated)

by Vicki Hahn

SGS – Stateline Genealogy Sorter.

(Also see article from Pacific Standard Magazine on Protecting Archives from Climate Change below.)

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We were very lucky at the Beloit Public Library that a recent major water leak did not affect our Genealogy/Local History Collection area.  As one Stateline Genealogy @ Beloit Public Library member said, “At least WE didn’t get any water damage.”  This water damage is not due to climate change, but a valid reminder of how vulnerable these archives are.

The recent prolific spring rains, and potential for flooding may be a good opportunity to pay attention to how you have your own personal valuable genealogy papers, artifacts, and books stored.  Years ago, the only things I cared about retrieving after a major house fire, were my purse and my photograph albums.  I have had items damaged by a furnace humidifier leaking, children recording over my Grandmother’s family history interview, dogs teething, etc.  Life happens – protect your history items.  Imagine anything happening.

The whole 1/4 of the Beloit Public Library, next to our Collection, was roped off for the month of April due to water damage from H-VACs leaking water overnight from the second floor.  The HVACs are not over the Genealogy/Local History Collection, but part of that was roped off also as the rehab crew worked.  The end of the Mystery Fiction Collection, and the Riverside Meeting Room were both inundated. The Library did lose 450 books from the Mystery Collection.  All of the furniture, carpet and ceiling in the Riverside Room had to be replaced, and some shelving ends. That being said, we were lucky.

And, I am continuing to add uniquely valuable items to our Local History Collection.

I have just gotten the go-ahead to start (retroactively to April 2015) get our Beloit Daily Newspapers microfilmed again, once we get funding from our Library FABL Friend at Beloit Library, or Foundation groups. The Beloit Daily News BDN cut paying for supplying the microfilms to Beloit Public Library and the Beloit College Archives Library at that time.  (This may take a few years.  It will include a request to purchase a second microfilm machine, as our old one has failed for good.)  I will also ask for the purchase of a third microfilm storage cabinet.  Sooner than that, we will move a third Local History lateral pamphlet file cabinet into our Genealogy/local History area.

Thanks to specialized Library Volunteers – we will soon have a complete Index to Book of Beloit (1 , 1836 – 1936) by  Linda Smith, which I will be getting into print.  (There has been an incomplete index available, but the new complete one will make searching so much more thorough.)  Linda also recently created a complete Index to Book of Beloit II, 1936 – 1986, which we have as a book in our Genealogy/Local History Collection.

The Beloit College Archives has a whole card catalog full of indexed cards to supplement the original Book of Beloit I.  I will have them compare our volunteer’s work to see if they have anything in addition (doubtful:) )  I will share the finished Index digitally with the other local history organizations – Beloit Historical Society, Rock County Historical Society, South Beloit Historical Society Wheeler House, Hedberg Public Library Janesville, and Beloit College Archives Library.

Phyllis DeGraff, another volunteer, has just finished creating an Index to, and digitally retyping a local history by Beloiter  “Woodrow Wilson Memoirs”.  This was from a typed manuscript that we received from Custom Book Binding (local publisher) . The manuscript is waiting my review, and later the publisher will give the Library some finished books once they are published.

Two other big local history collection additions are in the works (maybe done in a year?) Monette Bebow-Reinhard (a new volunteer) has started to transcribe the 1976 Beloit – Black Oral History CDs.  These are the interviews of several relatives/immigrants recruited from Pontotoc, Mississippi to work at Fairbanks Morse in Beloit Wisconsin.  These interviews have never been fully transcribed and will be a valuable printed resource on the important (local history) African American Up North Migration and Jim Crow experience.  The CDs can be checked out at the Library.  There are also on-line digital audio recordings that you can listen to on the WHS Wisconsin Historical Society website for free.

Fred Burwell, from Beloit College Archives Library, shared this:

“Here is a link to their main page on the oral histories:

http://digicoll.library.wisc.edu/cgi/f/findaid/findaid-idx?c=wiarchives;view=reslist;subview=standard;didno=uw-whs-audi00637a

If you click on any name at the side, it will lead you to a table of contents for that particular recording and you can click on a further link to the actual sound.  For some of the people there are multiple links to more than one recording.

There’s also a transcript for the Rubie Bond recording, although my guess is that it is not a complete transcript: https://www.wisconsinhistory.org/pdfs/lessons/EDU-LessonPlans-RubieBondOralHistory-Transcript.pdf

I am glad to hear that you have a volunteer interested in transcribing these incredibly valuable recordings.  I would love to have the transcripts!  They would be really useful for students and other researchers.”

Another project in the works, is a coincidence of timing.  We will have the work of a veteran on Vietnam Veteran Obituaries (donated to the Hedberg Public Library) in our Beloit People and Families Bookcase under “Veterans”.  And our Library Page, Susan Park, has gathered cemetery information as part of her long efforts to honor fellow military veterans while doing general volunteering work for FindaGrave.com .  An excellent photographer, and thorough researcher, Susan is working on creating books of all military burials in the Rock County cemeteries. In awhile, she will have her “Rock County Veterans in Oakwood Cemetery” book completed for our collection.   Later she will have her “Rock County Veterans in Eastlawn Cemetery” book completed.

Susan recently won the award from a  local Rock County veterans group – Montford Point Marine Post.:

“This past Saturday I was presented the Homer Hempstead Humanitarian Service Award by the National Montford Point Marine Association, Chapter 41.  An Award for Veterans, presented to Veterans, for serving Veterans.  The award was based on all the cemetery work I have done in Veterans Sections of our cemeteries.  I have photographed and created Memorial Pages for over 782 Veterans graves.  I strongly feel no Veteran should be lost or forgotten. 

Freedom is not Free.

Simply put, it’s Veterans taking care of Veterans.”

(On left – Major General Anderson, on the right Susan Park.)

And finally, a new book on Beloit by Robert Burdick,  “Growing Up in Beloit” was donated to the Library.  These are stories based on the articles that he wrote for years in the Beloit Daily News, Savoy Section.  http://squarepegbookshop.com/product/growing-up-in-beloit/  .  Bob has been coming to the Library for years to research aspects of his articles in our Genealogy/Local History Collection.

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How to Protect Rare Books & Manuscripts From the Ravages of Climate Change

(Vicki’s note – on-line article from Pacific Standard magazine, thanks to Ron Zarnick.)

(Read the full article here:)

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“Almost all American archives are at risk from disasters or changing temperatures. Community history will probably be the first to go…”
“Centuries of written history are at risk of being damaged by climate change. Yet archivists, the stewards of this history, have sometimes been slow to wake up to the danger.
This history, in the form of manuscripts, codices, printed books, and other material artifacts, is kept in expensive and well-ventilated university collections; it is tucked in crumpling cardboard boxes under the desks of local librarians; it sits crammed into the storage cupboards of city governments. Some documents attract scholars from around the world, while others hold scant interest beyond hobbyist historians. Many are irreplaceable.

Almost all are at risk of degradation caused by projected temperature changes, humidity, sea level rise, storm surges, and precipitation, according to new research on United States collections by a group of archivists and climate scientists.

…”The No. 1 thing you have to do to keep rare archival material from growing mildew or falling apart is to maintain a constant temperature and humidity,” Tansey says. “If the atmosphere outside is constantly hot one day, cold the next, that means you’re having to use that much more energy to keep your building at a consistent temperature for your collection, which is often contributing to climate change itself.” 

…There are measures that archivists can take to protect their collections, including identifying opportunities to relocate temporarily in the event of a disaster, or revamping storage facilities in light of local risks.”

 

Other Travelers Part 10 – Tracing the 1918 Flu Epidemic

(Part of an On-going Series – “Other Travelers”)

by Vicki Ruthe Hahn – SGS Stateline Genealogy Sorter

Have you gotten the flu this season?

Not the 24 hour stomach flu (which is bad enough), but the upper respiratory Influenza A or B?  Flu has hit this year especially hard, killing several children. But it is nothing close to the amount of deaths in the Pandemic of 1918.

Perhaps your ancestors were affected by that epidemic – one hundred years ago this year?  Whole families were wiped out.

 

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Let’s get some insight:

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From Standford Children’s Health:

“What are the different types of influenza?

Influenza viruses are divided into three types designated as A, B, and C:

  • Influenza types A and B are responsible for epidemics of respiratory illness that occur almost every winter and often lead to increased rates of hospitalization and death. Public health efforts to control the impact of influenza focus on types A and B. One of the reasons the flu remains a problem is because the viruses actually change their structure regularly. This means that people are exposed to new types of the virus each year.
  • Influenza type C usually causes either a very mild respiratory illness or no symptoms at all. It does not cause epidemics and does not have the severe public health impact that influenza types A and B do….
  1. A person infected with an influenza virus develops antibodies against that virus.
  2. The virus changes.
  3. The “older” antibodies no longer recognizes the “newer” virus when the next flu season comes around.
  4. The person becomes infected again.

The older antibodies can, however, give some protection against getting the flu again. Currently, three different influenza viruses circulate worldwide: two type A viruses and one type B virus. Vaccines given each year to protect against the flu contain the influenza virus strain from each type that is expected to cause the flu that year.

What causes influenza?

An influenza virus is generally passed from person to person through the air. .. with infected person who sneezes or coughs. The virus can also live for a short time on objects …can get the flu virus by touching something that has been handled by someone infected with the virus and then touching his or her own mouth, nose, or eyes.

People are generally the most contagious with the flu 24 hours before they start having symptoms  (emphasis mine) and during the time they have the most symptoms. That’s why it is hard to prevent the spread of the flu, especially among children, because they do not always know they are sick while they are still spreading the disease. The risk of infecting others usually stops around the seventh day of the infection.”

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See the source image

Most entertainments, churches, social clubs, libraries, movie houses, etc. were eventually shut down.  But they tried wearing masks for awhile!

Officials Wearing Gauze Masks

Milkmen(?) braving the Flu to deliver milk to stores, and to people’s homes

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The Flu Epidemic rapidly made many children orphans, dependent on the care of others.

Many families died of neglect or starvation, remaining isolated in their homes, afraid to come out for supplies or medical attention.  Some neighbors were afraid to enter the homes of those who were sick.  So many medical doctors were in the War, ill, or overwhelmed.  anyone with medical training was asked to help, and some communities recruited  volunteers to care for the sick.

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From Standford University, by Molly Billings, June, 1997 modified RDS February, 2005:

“The influenza pandemic of 1918-1919 killed more people than the Great War, known today as World War I (WWI) … It has been cited as the most devastating epidemic in recorded world history. More people died of influenza in a single year than in four-years of the Black Death Bubonic Plague from 1347 to 1351. Known as “Spanish Flu” or “La Grippe” the influenza of 1918-1919 was a global disaster…

In the two years that this scourge ravaged the earth, a fifth of the world’s population was infected. The flu was most deadly for people ages 20 to 40. This pattern of morbidity was unusual for influenza which is usually a killer of the elderly and young children. It infected 28% of all Americans (Tice).

An estimated 675,000 Americans died of influenza during the pandemic, ten times as many as in the world war. Of the U.S. soldiers who died in Europe, half of them fell to the influenza virus and not to the enemy (Deseret News). An estimated 43,000 servicemen mobilized for WWI died of influenza (Crosby). 1918 would go down as unforgettable year of suffering and death and yet of peace…

The effect of the influenza epidemic was so severe that the average life span in the US was depressed by 10 years.   (Emphasis mine.)…

In 1918 children would skip rope to the rhyme (Crawford):

 

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History is reflected in children’s games, and in songs.

(“Ring-around-the Rosie” is NOT from the time of the Black Plaque!)

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The mandatory gauze masks were not always very effective.  There is the story of 4 women who wore masks while playing cards one evening.  By the next morning three of them were dead from Influenza.

 

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In an effort to boost the War effort, President Woodrow Wilson (and others) initially tried to ignore the pandemic, and suppress news about it.  How depressing that so many of those who survived the war, ended up dying of influenza.  Whole shiploads of military men were affected, some never making it to serve in the War.

The cause of most of the deaths in this pandemic was the secondary pneumonia.  There were no antibiotics.  Influenza frequently has secondary infections – strep throat, ear infections, Pink Eye, etc.  But this time it was more than that. (see explanation below.)

Be alert if you see several people in your ancestor’s family die suddenly, and within a few days of each other, especially if between September 1918 and about June 1919.  A death certificate may not mention flu/influenza, but pneumonia, etc. as cause of death.  Or there might not have been a police officer/medical person/undertaker/county recorder available to make any registration. (see explanation below.)  Some members of the family may have been buried in a mass grave with no records.

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From History.com

The first wave of the 1918 pandemic occurred in the spring and was generally mild. The sick …experienced … typical flu symptoms….

However, a second, highly contagious wave of influenza appeared with a vengeance in the fall of that same year. Victims died within hours or days of developing symptoms, their skin turning blue and their lungs filling with fluid that caused them to suffocate….

Despite the fact that the 1918 flu wasn’t isolated to one place, it became known around the world as the Spanish flu, as Spain was hit hard by the disease and was not subject to the wartime news blackouts that affected other European countries. (Even Spain’s king, Alfonso XIII, reportedly contracted the flu.)

One unusual aspect of the 1918 flu was that it struck down many previously healthy, young people—a group normally resistant to this type of infectious illness—including a number of World War I servicemen…. Forty percent of the U.S. Navy was hit with the flu, while 36 percent of the Army became ill, and troops moving around the world in crowded ships and trains helped to spread the killer virus.

Although the death toll attributed to the Spanish flu is often estimated at 20 million to 50 million victims worldwide, other estimates run as high as 100 million victims. The exact numbers are impossible to know due to a lack of medical record-keeping in many places.

…Even President Woodrow Wilson reportedly contracted the flu in early 1919 while negotiating the Treaty of Versailles, which ended World War I.

When the 1918 flu hit, doctors and scientists were unsure what caused it or how to treat it. Unlike today, there were no effective vaccines or antivirals, drugs that treat the flu. (The first licensed flu vaccine appeared in America in the 1940s….)

Complicating matters was the fact that World War I had left parts of America with a shortage of physicians and other health workers. And of the available medical personnel in the U.S., many came down with the flu themselves.

Additionally, hospitals in some areas were so overloaded with flu patients that schools, private homes and other buildings had to be converted into makeshift hospitals, some of which were staffed by medical students.

Officials in some communities imposed quarantines, ordered citizens to wear masks and shut down public places, including schools, churches and theaters. People were advised to avoid shaking hands and to stay indoors, libraries put a halt on lending books and regulations were passed banning spitting… the Sanitary Code.”

The flu took a heavy human toll, wiping out entire families and leaving countless widows and orphans in its wake. Funeral parlors were overwhelmed and bodies piled up. Many people had to dig graves for their own family members.

The flu was also detrimental to the economy. In the United States, businesses were forced to shut down because so many employees were sick. Basic services such as mail delivery and garbage collection were hindered due to flu-stricken workers.

In some places there weren’t enough farm workers to harvest crops. Even state and local health departments closed for business, hampering efforts to chronicle the spread of the 1918 flu and provide the public with answers about it.

By the summer of 1919, the flu pandemic came to an end, as those that were infected either died or developed immunity.

Almost 90 years later, in 2008, researchers announced they’d discovered what made the 1918 flu so deadly: A group of three genes enabled the virus to weaken a victim’s bronchial tubes and lungs and clear the way for bacterial pneumonia.

Since 1918, there have been several other influenza pandemics, although none as deadly.”

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The 1918 Spanish Flu Pandemic was world wide:

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The ultimate “other Travelers” in this story are the viruses and bacteria that exploded throughout the world for those 15 months 1918 – 1919.

PBS has a very good “American Experience” documentary of the topic

Aired January 2, 2018

Influenza 1918

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/films/influenza/

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The American military in World War I and the influenza pandemic were closely connected. Influenza spread in The crowded conditions of military camps in the United States and in the trenches of the Western Front in Europe. The virus traveled with military personnel from camp to camp and across the Atlantic military transit ships.  September – November 1918, influenza and pneumonia sickened many in the military at the height of the American military involvement in the war.  This affected the war.

US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health

Public Health Rep. 2010; 125(Suppl 3): 82–91.

INFLUENZA IN THE CAMPS

(read the entire article by clicking the links above.)

“…the virus traveled west and south, arriving at Camp Grant, Illinois, on Saturday, September 21, 1918, with 70 hospital admissions. “So sudden and appalling was the visitation that it required the greatest energy and cooperation of every officer, every man, and every nurse to meet the emergency,” wrote one observer.4 (p. 749) Hospital admissions rose to 194, then 370, then 492, to a high of 788 admissions on September 29. Hospital officials summoned all officers on leave, converted barracks to hospital wards, and by “extreme effort” expanded the hospital capacity from “10 occupied beds to a capacity of 4,102 beds in six days.”4 (p.751)

Influenza still overwhelmed every department. The hospital laboratory resorted to local civilian facilities to perform specimen tests. Camp ophthalmologists saw patients with conjunctivitis, an influenza complication, and ear, nose, and throat specialists saw those with other dangerous secondary infections. As individuals became seriously ill, camp officials sent out “danger” or “death” telegrams to families and loved ones, but soon they received so many return calls, telegrams, and visitors, they had to set up a separate hospital tent as an information bureau. Medical personnel were not immune. Eleven of the 81 medical officers fell ill, and three civilian and three Army nurses died. The epidemic even caused the Medical Department to drop its prohibition on black nurses so that Camp Grant called African American nurses to care for patients. The women had to wait, however, until separate, segregated accommodations could be constructed.”

 

National Archives: World War I Centennial

As the largest repository of American World War I records, the National Archives invites you to browse the wealth of records and information documenting the U.S. experience in this conflict, including photographs, documents, audiovisual recordings, educational resources, articles, blog posts, lectures, and events.

Veteran’s Service Records:

https://www.archives.gov/veterans

 

 

 

More Historic Beloit Newspaper Microfilms at the Beloit Public Library

More Historic Beloit Newspaper Microfilms at the Beloit Public Library

February 22, 2018

by Vicki Ruthe Hahn

Image result for historic newspaper microfilm

Many more  of the Historic Beloit Newspaper Microfilms are cataloged and available now for patrons to use on the microfilm machines at the Beloit Public Library.
These were paid for by FNDN Beloit Public Library Foundation.
The patrons are going to love having these additional microfilms.
I put the reels into the bottom right hand side of the microfilm case.
Once the  rest of the microfilms get cataloged,
I will re-arrange the whole case with the earliest newspapers first, (by title).
See the source image
These have been added to the microfilms we have had:
Beloit Free Press (1848 – 1903) with a new one 1900 – 1903.
Beloit Daily Grit (1892 – 1897)
Beloit Daily News BDN (1897 –  March 2015)
(Then look on BPL homepage on-line)
See the source image
These are the titles we have added so far:
Weekly Argus (1885 – 1888)
Beloit Weekly Outlook ( 1880 – 1884)
Beloit Deutsche Zeitung 1895 – 1896
Weekly Citizen & Weekly News (1888 – 1906)
Beloit Labor Journal (1902 – 1903)
Soul City Courier (Oct 1976 – Jan 1977)

More information about the on-line Library newspaper holding is under the  BLOG tab “Genealogy Links and Electronic Helps”.

March 1, 2018 Update

More microfilms cataloged and added:

Beloit Outlook  (Jan 3, 1879; Jan 8, 1880 – May 8, 1880)

Beloit Outlook (Jan 3, 1880 – Jun 26, 1880)

Beloit Daily News! (Aug 14, 1945)

Crusader – Rockford IL  (Sep 1952, Nov 21, 1952; Jul 3, 1963 – Mar 29, 1957)

Crusader – Rockford IL  (Sep 6, 1968 – Jun 2, 1971)

 

 

Access Newspaper ARCHIVE PDF View Discontinued

Vicki’s note – Update from WI Libraries for Everyone – this is one of the major databases that we use for searching for (non-Beloit) historic newspapers at the Beloit Public Library.  I use it a lot for my own research for my family, and for others.

It is still available for free on our Homepage, through Badgerlink in Wisconsin.  Other States have different ways to access it, as each state chooses whether to pay for access (to this and other databases) for their citizens.

The only thing I found for Illinois so far is this:

The Illinois History –Digital Imaging grants expand access to electronic collections through the Illinois Digital Archives database maintained by the Illinois State Library (thru Jesse White, the Secretary of State. To view the collections and other historical artifacts, visit the Illinois Digital Archives website at http://idaillinois.org/.

We will just have to get used to using it a different way.  If you have not used historic newspapers in your family sleuthing, I recommend that you try this out.  I will be using it again soon to see how the new method works.

WI Libraries For Everyone:

Access Newspaper ARCHIVE

PDF View Discontinued

Access NewspaperARCHVE PDF View Discontinued

Posted: 21 Jul 2017 09:11 AM PDT

Friday, July 21, 2017

After September 30, 2017, in Access NewspaperARCHIVE, you will no longer be able to view an article as a PDF. But don’t worry, you will still be able to download newspaper pages as PDFs.

The PDF viewer is being discontinued because PDF images are much larger than the JPEGs, taking a considerable amount of time to download and also putting a massive load on Access NewspaperARCHIVE’s servers. Additionally, Adobe Viewer is a third party platform which means Access NewspaperARCHIVE has no control over how the end product is displayed to the user.

After the transition away from the PDF Viewer, you will still be able to download in 2 easy steps.

1. Click on the envelope in the toolbar.

2. Select Save as PDF.

Written by:
Kara Ripley, Resources for Libraries and Lifelong Learning

WPLC Announces – More Historical Content Added to Archive of Wisconsin Newspapers

Vicki’s note – more local historic newspapers on-line.

cropped-a1

 

WPLC Announces –

More Historical Content Added to

Archive of Wisconsin Newspapers

6-27-2017

More than 100,000 pages of early newspapers from six Wisconsin communities can now be discovered in the Archive of Wisconsin Newspapers. The Belleville Public Library, Black River Falls Public Library, Dwight Foster Public Library, Eager Free Library, Prairie du Chien Public Library and Stephenson Public Library worked together with BadgerLink, the Wisconsin Historical Society, Wisconsin Public Library Consortium (WPLC) and the Wisconsin Newspaper Association (WNA) to add this content to the Archive.

Wisconsin residents can now access the following titles through BadgerLink:

  • Belleville Recorder 1887-1923
  • Badger State Banner 1868-1926
  • Banner Journal 1931-1938
  • Evansville Badger 1898-1906
  • Evansville Enterprise 1895-1911
  • Evansville Review 1899-1932
  • Evansville Tribune 1899-1908
  • Jackson County Banner 1867-1868
  • Jefferson County Union 1870-1918
  • Prairie du Chien Courier Press 1852-1922
  • Marinette and Peshtigo Eagle 1871-1896

These titles join the list of historical newspapers added to the Archive in 2016 thanks to an LSTA-funded pilot project. To explore the full collection, visit the Archive of Wisconsin Newspapers.

The Archive of Wisconsin Newspapers is an ongoing collaboration of WHS, WPLC, WNA, and BadgerLink. For more information about how your library can participate, visit http://www.wplc.info/newspapers.